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The Encyclopaedia Logic: Part 1 of the Encyclopaedia of Philosophical…

by G. W. F. Hegel

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Hegel's Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences (Logic)

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The appearance of this translation is a major event in English-language Hegel studies, for it is more than simply a replacement for Wallace's translation cum paraphrase. Hegel's Prefaces to each of the three editions of the Enzyklopädie are translated for the first time into English. There is a very detailed Introduction translating Hegel's German, which serves not only as a guide to the translator's usage but also to Hegel's. Also included are a detailed bilingual annotated glossary, very extensive bibliographic and interpretive notes to Hegel's text (28 pp.), an Index of References for works cited in the notes, a select Bibliography of recent works on Hegel's logic, and a detailed Index (16 pp.). The translation is guided by the (correct) principle that rendering Hegel's logical thought clearly and consistently requires rendering his technical terms logically. . . . This ought immediately to become the standard translation of this important work. --Kenneth R. Westphal, in Review of Metaphysics… (more)
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This is comparatively clear, and I mean 'compared to the Science of Logic,' which is the most opaque, worst written book of all time. And the actual 'logic' parts of it are really still pretty opaque. But the prefaces and introduction and 'position of thought' stuff are fantastic background for understanding what Hegel was trying to do in general, and it should be mandatory to read it before starting on the Phenomenology or philosophy of history and so on. Unfortunately, vita brevis, and most people have probably got better things to do. If you are interested in Hegel, though, get this edition of this book, and plunge in. ( )
1 vote stillatim | Dec 29, 2013 |
This is Logic from the Encycolpedia. It's far more ethereal than you would expect from the title. I see the elemental building blocks of a logical system, but they are very abstract. The root of the philosophy is based on "being" and "nought" meeting at "becoming," which is analagous to the "flow" of all things. In contemplation of infinity, it is important not to stop at the wrong infinity of endless progression. Based on these and other concepts, being becomes being for self and then is somehow related to repulsion and attraction, analogous to atoms. ( )
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
G. W. F. Hegelprimary authorall editionscalculated
Andersone, IndraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zariņš, VilnisForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This is the Encyclopaedia Logic (or the "Lesser" or "Shorter" Logic). It is not to be confused with the longer Science of Logic (Wissenschaft der Logik).
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The appearance of this translation is a major event in English-language Hegel studies, for it is more than simply a replacement for Wallace's translation cum paraphrase. Hegel's Prefaces to each of the three editions of the Enzyklopädie are translated for the first time into English. There is a very detailed Introduction translating Hegel's German, which serves not only as a guide to the translator's usage but also to Hegel's. Also included are a detailed bilingual annotated glossary, very extensive bibliographic and interpretive notes to Hegel's text (28 pp.), an Index of References for works cited in the notes, a select Bibliography of recent works on Hegel's logic, and a detailed Index (16 pp.). The translation is guided by the (correct) principle that rendering Hegel's logical thought clearly and consistently requires rendering his technical terms logically. . . . This ought immediately to become the standard translation of this important work. --Kenneth R. Westphal, in Review of Metaphysics

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