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The Immortals of Meluha (Shiva Trilogy, #1)…
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The Immortals of Meluha (Shiva Trilogy, #1) (original 2010; edition 2010)

by Amish Tripathi

Series: Shiva (1)

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7852023,281 (3.79)7
Amish Tripathi devoted years to the research of Hindu mythological stories and history, and discussions with his family about the destiny of the human body, mind and soul to create this sweeping and fascinating adaptation of ancient Hindu mythology for modern fantasy readers. 1900 BC in what modern Indians call the Indus Valley Civilization and the inhabitants called the land of Meluha: a near-perfect empire created many centuries earlier by Lord Ram--one of the greatest monarchs that ever lived--faces peril as its primary river, the Saraswati, is slowly drying to exctinction. The Suryavanshi rulers are challenged with devastating terrorist attacks from the east, the land of the Chandravanshis. To make matters worse, the Chandravanshis appear to have allied with the Nagas, an ostracized and sinister race of deformed humans with astonishing martial skills. The only hope for the Suryavanshis is an ancient legend: When evil reaches epic proportions, when all seems lost, a hero will emerge. Is the unexpected, rough-hewn Tibetan immigrant Shiva that hero? Drawn suddenly to his destiny, duty, and by love, Shiva will attempt to move mountains and lead the Suryavanshi to destroy evil.… (more)
Member:apmurali
Title:The Immortals of Meluha (Shiva Trilogy, #1)
Authors:Amish Tripathi
Info:Westland , Paperback, 436 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Immortals of Meluha by Amish Tripathi (2010)

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» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Great book. Action Packed!!! ( )
  Prithiraj | Jun 2, 2021 |
4.5 Stars
A brilliant storyline based on indian mythology. I wasn't keen on starting this series because I don't like it when facts that I have read from mythologies change. But the author has done an amazing work in building all the characters!
People who aren't familiar with mythologies won't be confused when they read this. ( )
  Vibha_V | Feb 18, 2021 |
A mighty good book by an Indian author!
Simply unputdownable, Amish has done an incredible job bringing Lord Shiva's story to the wider audience in a manner which is simply breathtaking.
Its a trifecta of a love story, an action thriller and mythological drama, all combined into one exciting package.
Gonna finish the rest of the trilogy soon! ( )
  Govindap11 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Though it is a gripping tale it makes you yawn occasionally. ( )
  Kausik_Lakkaraju | Jan 20, 2020 |
I picked up the Immortals of Meluha at Delhi airport last year. I think it cost just shy of 3€. At the time, this was a huge bestseller in India, with the third volume being at the top of the bestseller list and the two earlier ones still in top ten.

The blurbs on the cover compare the author, Amish Tripathi, to everyone from Tolkien to Paulo Coehlo and even promise that it "uncovers the deepest recesses of the soul", a pompous and hollow statement made naturally by none other than that peddler of anything "spiritual", quasi-scientific and Indian, Deepak Chopra.

In reality, Immortals of Meluha is a sub-par fantasy novel by a banker turned novelist (which shows). It suffers from several specific problems, but even on overall is just plain too dull.

The story is a mythological and fictional account of how Shiva, one of the most important Hindu deities, walked the path from a mortal to a god. The setting is the so called (although apparently incorrectly) Indus Valley Civilization in Northern India, around 1900 BC. This has all the potential of being a interesting mix of history, mythology and religion. Unfortunately, Amish botches it up.

Shiva, a mere mortal for now, is apparently the most badass person ever imagined. He is the best at everything. The best fighter, the smartest person in the history of the world, the best military strategist and even the best dancer. Annoying in its own, but even more annoying is that every other character in the book loudly proclaims this at every chance they get, over and over and over again. Everyone is completely and utterly in love with Shiva, if not immediately upon meeting him, then five minutes later. Subtlety - not one of Amish's strengths.

A similar problem exists with the Meluhan civilization. In order for the author to establish how great that civilization is (and therefore possibly justify the rather fascist trumping of the neighboring civilization), everybody constantly proclaims the civilization's achievements to anyone who would listen. It gets even more ridiculous here, as the Suryavanshis apparently already have extensive knowledge of electromagnetic radiation, oxygen and free radicals. In 1900 BC, literally thousands of years before they had actually been discovered. Despite this incredible technological advancement, they still believe in a blue-throated Messiah that will deliver them from all their worldly problems, in the form of Shiva, a Tibetan tribal chief.

Comparable mental gymnastics are also in place when justification for Meluhan social systems is needed, such as the rigid caste system and the shunning of injured and afflicted people, although, to author's credit, Shiva is conflicted about this.

The writing style is also pretty awkward, with weird jokes that seem out of context for that time and place and incredibly corny moments, such as deathbed I wuv you proclamations better suited to a Mexican telenovella. In fact, I don't think Amish captured the spirit of time and place at all, since people talk and act like they would nowadays.

To top it all, the book ends on a complete cliff-hanger. I'm not talking about the main plots not being resolved, it literally ends in the middle of an action scene. The dude's got balls, is all I have to say.

A few brighter moments include Shiva's internal agonizing over his own merit to take on the role of the Messiah, and the injustices of Meluhan societal structure, and his eventual realization that the other civilization is not evil, but perhaps just different. In the end, though, this is not worth it at all, there's loads of better fantasy and historical fiction around. ( )
1 vote matija2019 | Jan 8, 2019 |
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Amish Tripathi devoted years to the research of Hindu mythological stories and history, and discussions with his family about the destiny of the human body, mind and soul to create this sweeping and fascinating adaptation of ancient Hindu mythology for modern fantasy readers. 1900 BC in what modern Indians call the Indus Valley Civilization and the inhabitants called the land of Meluha: a near-perfect empire created many centuries earlier by Lord Ram--one of the greatest monarchs that ever lived--faces peril as its primary river, the Saraswati, is slowly drying to exctinction. The Suryavanshi rulers are challenged with devastating terrorist attacks from the east, the land of the Chandravanshis. To make matters worse, the Chandravanshis appear to have allied with the Nagas, an ostracized and sinister race of deformed humans with astonishing martial skills. The only hope for the Suryavanshis is an ancient legend: When evil reaches epic proportions, when all seems lost, a hero will emerge. Is the unexpected, rough-hewn Tibetan immigrant Shiva that hero? Drawn suddenly to his destiny, duty, and by love, Shiva will attempt to move mountains and lead the Suryavanshi to destroy evil.

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