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American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of…
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American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters, and Fields (original 2010; edition 2010)

by Rowan Jacobsen (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
16720127,217 (4.29)34
"Why does honey from the tupelo-lined banks of the Apalachicola River have a kick of cinnamon unlike any other? Why is salmon from Alaska's Yukon River the richest in the world? Why does one underground cave in Greensboro, Vermont, produce many of the country's most intense cheeses? The answer is terroir (tare-WAHR), the "taste of place." Originally used by the French to describe the way local conditions such as soil and climate affect the flavor of a wine, terroir has been little understood (and often mispronounced) by Americans, until now. For those who have embraced the local food movement, American Terroir will share the best of America's bounty and explain why place matters. It will be the first guide to the "flavor landscapes" of some of our most iconic foods, including apples, honey, maple syrup, coffee, oysters, salmon, wild mushrooms, wine, cheese, and chocolate. With equally iconic recipes by the author and important local chefs, and a complete resource section for finding place-specific foods, American Terroir is the perfect companion for any self-respecting locavore."--pub. desc.… (more)
Member:JenniferHattersley
Title:American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters, and Fields
Authors:Rowan Jacobsen (Author)
Info:Bloomsbury USA (2010), Edition: 1, 288 pages
Collections:Food Writing
Rating:
Tags:None

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American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters, and Fields by Rowan Jacobsen (2010)

  1. 00
    Food Heroes: 16 Culinary Artisans Preserving Tradition by Georgia Pellegrini (sgump)
    sgump: A lovely collection of food-related essays. What’s particularly nice is how the author didn’t show off but rather let those she profiled speak for themselves: she seemed to be empathetic, understanding. Jacobsen treats others in a similar way in his writings.
  2. 00
    Twain's Feast: Searching for America's Lost Foods in the Footsteps of Samuel Clemens by Andrew Beahrs (gtown)
  3. 00
    Bottomfeeder: How to Eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood by Taras Grescoe (DetailMuse)
  4. 00
    The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan (DetailMuse)
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» See also 34 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
This is an essential book for those who care about quality and variety in food. Both extremely informative and well written. ( )
  altonmann | Jan 24, 2018 |
On hold - I lost my copy, temporarily, I hope.
  laurenbufferd | Nov 14, 2016 |
A fascinating book about the effects that location has on foods grown or harvested in America (North and South). Rowan Jacobsen chooses 12 foods, from oysters to chocolate, and investigates why something from a particular place tastes so much better than the same thing from another place. Missouri's Norton grape/wine gets a small mention in the wine section, which focuses mainly on California. ( )
  tloeffler | May 31, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The book is a thoroughly entertaining combination of food and travel writing, taking the reader from a Yupik Eskimo community in the Yukon to a remote Venezuelan village renowned for producing the world's finest chocolate. Jacobsen is witty, observant, and enthusiastic about his subjects. He is also able to captivate his audience, even when explaining the science behind the story.

Longer review posted on Rose City Reader. ( )
1 vote RoseCityReader | Jul 28, 2011 |
I picked this up because it was one of Library Journal's top ten books of 2010, and while I am not sure if I would make the same pick, it is pretty darn good. Jacobsen takes the wine concept of "terroir" and applies it to other food. Terroir is the idea of place imparting a distinctive flavor (and other food attributes, crunch maybe for apples) to wine or food, due to the mineral content of the soil, the growing conditions, climate, etc. So Jacobsen, somewhat like Michael Pollan in The Botany of Desire, explores specific foods in different chapters - he visits farms, wineries, the coffee trade ( ah ha, i feel backed up on my dislike of dark roasts!), maple sugar makers from Vermont, apple orchards in Washington, salmon from Alaska natives, honey - who knew there were so many distinctive flavors of honey in the US based on what the bees foraged on? - and more. He is young and engaging, nice writing, with enthusiasm that comes across well on the page. I would recommend the book to foodies, people who like to read about food, and anyone who wants a good nonfiction narrative kind of book. ( )
1 vote amanderson | Jun 13, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
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"Why does honey from the tupelo-lined banks of the Apalachicola River have a kick of cinnamon unlike any other? Why is salmon from Alaska's Yukon River the richest in the world? Why does one underground cave in Greensboro, Vermont, produce many of the country's most intense cheeses? The answer is terroir (tare-WAHR), the "taste of place." Originally used by the French to describe the way local conditions such as soil and climate affect the flavor of a wine, terroir has been little understood (and often mispronounced) by Americans, until now. For those who have embraced the local food movement, American Terroir will share the best of America's bounty and explain why place matters. It will be the first guide to the "flavor landscapes" of some of our most iconic foods, including apples, honey, maple syrup, coffee, oysters, salmon, wild mushrooms, wine, cheese, and chocolate. With equally iconic recipes by the author and important local chefs, and a complete resource section for finding place-specific foods, American Terroir is the perfect companion for any self-respecting locavore."--pub. desc.

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