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Signs by Maurice Merleau-Ponty
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"O discurso é uma maneira de extrair um significado de um todo indiviso". Assim, Maurice Merleau-Ponty descreve o discurso nesta coleção póstuma de importantes escritos sobre a filosofia da expressão. Para ele, a expressão é uma categoria do comportamento humano e a existência muito mais ampla do que a linguagem. Ele afirma que o homem é essencialmente expressivo, mesmo antes de falar: mesmo em silêncio, é todo gestos e comportamento vivido. ( )
  jgcorrea | Jan 13, 2019 |
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"Speech is a way of tearing out a meaning from an undivided whole." Thus does Maurice Merleau-Ponty describe speech in this collection of his important writings on the philosophy of expression, composed during the last decade of his life. For him, expression is a category of human behavior and existence much broader than language alone. He maintains that man is essentially expressive, even prior to speaking: in his silence, gestures, and lived behavior.… (more)

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