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Locavore From Farmers Fields to Rooftop…
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Locavore From Farmers Fields to Rooftop Gardenshow Canadians Are Changing…

by Sarah Elton

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373464,763 (4)9
Strawberries in January, fresh tomatoes year-round and New Zealand lamb at all times -- these well-travelled foods have a carbon footprint the size of an SUV. But there is a burgeoning local food movement taking place in Canadian cities, farms and shops that is changing both the way we eat and the way we think about food. Locavore describes how foodies,100-milers, urbanites, farmers, gardeners and chefs across Canada are creating a new local food order that has the potential to fight climate change and feed us all. Combining front-line reporting, shrewd analysis and passionate food writing to delight the gastronome, Locavore shows how the pieces of a post-industrial food system are being assembled into something infinitely better. We meet city-dwellers who grow crops in their backyards and office workers who have traded their keyboards for pitchforks. We learn how a group of New Brunswick farmers saved the family farm, why artisanal cheese in Quebec is so popular and how a century-old farm survives in urban British Columbia, bordered by the ocean on one side and by a new housing development on the other. We follow food culture activists as they work to preserve the genetic material of heritage plants to return once-endangered flavours to our tables. In recounting the stories of its diverse cast of characters, Locavore lays out a blueprint for a local food revolution. From Locavore :At farmers’ markets across the city, heritage tomatoes, free-range eggs and organic purslane are sold out before noon.... And at the cheese shop, the rich but not-too-salty sheep’s milk feta made on the outskirts of Toronto is so popular I never know when I’ll find it again. Everywhere, it seems, demand outstrips supply for local produce.… (more)

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This looks at trying to eat locally in various parts of Canada. The first half of the book looks at agriculture and farming (the family farm, young farmers, organics, greenhouses), and the second half of the book moves into cities (urban farming, restaurants serving local, etc.)

Lots of people in lots of places across the country are doing things to try to make the world better by sourcing locally. It was interesting to learn about some of those different things. The author has a section at the end where she tries to help offer suggestions on what people can do/look for/ask if they want to move toward eating locally. She admits that she isn’t perfect about it, but really, every little bit helps. At the same time, once again, I wish I liked to cook or garden or both – would be really useful for my environmental sensibilities. ( )
  LibraryCin | Jun 30, 2019 |
An interesting book on sustainable agriculture and the local food movement in Canada. Some good things are happening right across the country. ( )
  kelli413 | Oct 24, 2010 |
Full review:

http://readingthroughlife.ca/locavore-review/

Short excerpt:

I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who lives in Canada – or elsewhere – who is interested in the local food movement or in sustainable food production. Elton’s writing is strong and interesting, making her argument clearly and really illustrating her opinions with good examples and proof of how Canadians are changing the way they eat. I really enjoyed Locavore, and am looking forward to putting some of the principles in practice that I hadn’t been doing already.
  readingthroughlife | Jun 13, 2010 |
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