HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Big-Box Swindle: The True Cost of Mega-Retailers and the Fight for…

by Stacy Mitchell

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1445157,223 (3.9)2
Large retail chains have become the most powerful corporations in America and are rapidly transforming our economy, communities, and landscape. Local-business researcher Mitchell illustrates how mega-retailers are fueling many of our most pressing problems, from the shrinking middle class to rising water pollution and diminished civic engagement. Mitchell's investigation takes us from the suburbs of Cleveland to a fruit farm in California, the stockroom of an Oregon Wal-Mart, and a Pennsylvania town's Main Street. She uncovers the role government policy has played in the expansion of mega-retailers and builds a compelling case that communities composed of many small businesses are healthier and more prosperous than those dominated by large chains. More than a critique, this book draws on real life to present innovative approaches--from cutting-edge land-use policies to small-business initiatives--that together provide a detailed road map to a more prosperous and sustainable future.--From publisher description.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
I borrowed this one from the UHD Library. I liked it, and I also recommended it to my students, crossposting from my blog to the student resource blog I maintain. Wal-Mart and Big-Boxes are a popular freshman composition topic here, thus the recommendation.

Here is a link to the note I wrote about it in my personal blog:

[http://itinerantlibrarian.blogspot.com/2007/06/booknote-big-box-swindle.html] ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
It can be hard to say one enjoys a book as disturbing as this one. But ultimately, it is filled with valuable information that can arm you for any friend of yours who attacks you with the constant refrain of "You have to shop at Wal-Mart because [fill in favorite argument of your friends here]". The tactics of the big-box stores are well researched and the impact of the new form of marketing on the life of a community is explored. Although I am not a big fan of the argument that you can't present a problem without also presenting the solution, I will say that the author does do that here. She discusses various things communities can do to fight back, and gives examples from a number of communities that have successfully restored the vibrancy of their downtown (or protected an already vibrant downtown) and staved of the invasion of the big boxes. For this most part, this is not a cheery story, but the author writes in such an easy to read style, you almost don't notice all the statistics she includes; however, those statistics are a valuable part of the story. This should be read by every city councilman in every city, town, or village large enough to be attractive to big-box stores. ( )
  Devil_llama | Jun 8, 2014 |
It's a shame that the people who need to read this book will not. ( )
  Manyra | Apr 3, 2013 |
Lots of statistics on how bad they are but not a lot on how to compete against them. Good book for community leaders, chamber of commerce, etc. ( )
  cwflatt | Dec 24, 2010 |
A great expose! Too bad you won't get it at most book stores; not all libraries have it either.

It describes how big-box stores destroy local businesses and probes areas where they behave like corporate spoiled brats. ( )
  rhodgens | Oct 9, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Large retail chains have become the most powerful corporations in America and are rapidly transforming our economy, communities, and landscape. Local-business researcher Mitchell illustrates how mega-retailers are fueling many of our most pressing problems, from the shrinking middle class to rising water pollution and diminished civic engagement. Mitchell's investigation takes us from the suburbs of Cleveland to a fruit farm in California, the stockroom of an Oregon Wal-Mart, and a Pennsylvania town's Main Street. She uncovers the role government policy has played in the expansion of mega-retailers and builds a compelling case that communities composed of many small businesses are healthier and more prosperous than those dominated by large chains. More than a critique, this book draws on real life to present innovative approaches--from cutting-edge land-use policies to small-business initiatives--that together provide a detailed road map to a more prosperous and sustainable future.--From publisher description.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.9)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 10
4.5
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Beacon Press

2 editions of this book were published by Beacon Press.

Editions: 0807035009, 0807035017

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 169,937,653 books! | Top bar: Always visible