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Odes and Epodes (Loeb Classical Library) by…
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Odes and Epodes (Loeb Classical Library) (edition 2004)

by Horace (Author), Niall Rudd (Translator)

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971821,682 (4.06)1 / 5
The writings of Horace have exerted strong and continuing influence on writers from his day to our own. Sophisticated and intellectual, witty and frank, he speaks to the cultivated and civilized world of today with the same astringent candor and sprightliness that appeared so fresh at the height of Rome's wealthy and glory. In 23 B.C., when he published the first three books of his lyrics, Horace was 42 years old, secure in the favor of the emperor Augustus, and living in ease and comfort as a country gentleman on his Sabine farm. Serenity is reflected in these lyrics, certainly, but so are other experiences, for Horace had lived through three major political crises in a society that was the center of the world, that was sophisticated, refined-and beginning to decay. A worldly, high-spirited, cultivated man, Horace responds in his poetry to the myriad elements of Roman life he knew so well. The Odes and Epodes of Horace collects the entirety of his lyric poetry, comprising all 103 odes, the Carmen Saeculare ("Festival Hymn"), and the earlier epodes. Joseph P. Clancy has achieved a mirroring of the originals that is worthy in its own right as English verse, and his introductions to each book of lyrics are both lively and informed.… (more)
Member:Biblio-Ortenburg
Title:Odes and Epodes (Loeb Classical Library)
Authors:Horace (Author)
Other authors:Niall Rudd (Translator)
Info:Harvard University Press (2004), Edition: Bilingual, 368 pages
Collections:Main Collection
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Epodes and Odes by Horace

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 Ancient History: Horace15 unread / 15anthonywillard, August 2010

» See also 5 mentions

English (6)  Dutch (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (8)
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Edition: // Descr: // Series: Call No. { 874 H78 9 } Edited by Heinrich Duntzer. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Edition: // Descr: xxi, 431 p. 17 cm. // Series: The Loeb Classical Library Call No. { 874 H78-L 1 } Series Edited by T.E. Page With an English Translation by C.E. Bennnett Contains Indexes of Proper Naames and First Lines. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Edition: Second Edition // Descr: lxxxvii, 443 p. 19 cm. // Series: College Series of Latin Authors Call No. { 874 H78 26 } Series Edited by Clement Lawrence Smith and Tracey Peck Edited with Introduction and Notes by Clement Lawrence Smith Contains Critical Appendix and Indexes. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Edition: // Descr: xxxvii, 514 p. 18 cm. // Series: The Student's Series of Latin Classics Call No. { 874 H78 24 } Edited with Introduction and Notes by Paul Shorey Revised by Paul Shorey and Gordon J. Laing Contains Index. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Edition: // Descr: xxxvii, 514 p. 18.5 cm. // Series: The Student's Series of Latin Classics Call No. { 874 H78 15 } Edited with Introduction and Notes by Paul Shorey Revised by Paul Shorey and Gordon J. Laing Contains Index. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (76 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Horaceprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bennett, C. E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Färber, HansEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garrison, Daniel H.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Laing, Gordon J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Page, T. E.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Peck, TracyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, ClementEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, Clement LawrenceEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Untermeyer, LouisEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
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Maecenas atavis edite regibus,
o et praesidium et dulce decus meum
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is currently both the original Latin text and modern translations. Ideally the original Latin should be separated out (Dead Language exception rule).
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Wikipedia in English (1)

The writings of Horace have exerted strong and continuing influence on writers from his day to our own. Sophisticated and intellectual, witty and frank, he speaks to the cultivated and civilized world of today with the same astringent candor and sprightliness that appeared so fresh at the height of Rome's wealthy and glory. In 23 B.C., when he published the first three books of his lyrics, Horace was 42 years old, secure in the favor of the emperor Augustus, and living in ease and comfort as a country gentleman on his Sabine farm. Serenity is reflected in these lyrics, certainly, but so are other experiences, for Horace had lived through three major political crises in a society that was the center of the world, that was sophisticated, refined-and beginning to decay. A worldly, high-spirited, cultivated man, Horace responds in his poetry to the myriad elements of Roman life he knew so well. The Odes and Epodes of Horace collects the entirety of his lyric poetry, comprising all 103 odes, the Carmen Saeculare ("Festival Hymn"), and the earlier epodes. Joseph P. Clancy has achieved a mirroring of the originals that is worthy in its own right as English verse, and his introductions to each book of lyrics are both lively and informed.

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