HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Most Dangerous Place: Pakistan's Lawless Frontier

by Imtiaz Gul

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
565365,489 (3)6
In this gripping and definitive exposé, Gul reveals the story of the dark side of the Afghan war--and tells how Pakistan has degenerated into a nuclear-armed powder keg.
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
These natural born killers nurtured by the west to drive the soviets from Afghanistan have now come home to roost and have become a menace to not only this region but the entire world.
  danoomistmatiste | Jan 24, 2016 |
These natural born killers nurtured by the west to drive the soviets from Afghanistan have now come home to roost and have become a menace to not only this region but the entire world.
  kkhambadkone | Jan 17, 2016 |
A good read, well written. It comes from a Pakistani author, and therefore his sensibilities are not my western sensibilities, nor do we share points of common reference. This is worth keeping in mind. He gives a vivid and frightening sense of the terrible human cost of the islamist drive backwards to the dark ages. The Army operations, the casual violence and kidnappings, the use of terror and some kind of death-based "sharia" law by the islamists, all make life in the FATA terrible to behold. He makes a convincing case for the complete withdrawal of support by the Pakistani state agencies, ISI above all, for the islamists. But he leaves open the question of the impact of islamists inside the state agencies. There is no rosy picture here, and no solutions. Further, the book ended on a guardedly optimistic note about Pakistani-western relations which within weeks of going to press was made redundant by the American killing bin Laden and the visceral and negative Pakistani reaction. I guess we will be hearing about the north-west frontier for a long time to come, from Mr. Gul and from others. ( )
  RobertP | Aug 26, 2011 |
Disclaimer - The book I read is an advanced uncorrected proof which I received for free.

The book gets its title from a speech President Obama made on March, 2009: "For the American people, this border region has become the most dangerous place in the world,"

This scrupulous coverage of Pakistan was written by the knowledgeable Imtiaz Gul. The author does not only quote reference material but also an array of impressive personas he personally spoke to. For me, the element of personal knowledge gave this book immense credibility and I ultimately viewed the author's insights as expert opinions.

See the rest of the review at: http://manoflabook.blogspot.com/2010/07/most-dangerous-place-pakistans-lawless.h... ( )
  ZoharLaor | Jul 12, 2010 |
I won this galley in a Goodreads giveaway, so I thought I'd copy over my review. While the uncorrected galley I read did need some editing, and I felt the chapter organization of the book was a bit random (I finally got some answers to some of my basic questions in the last, significant chapter), The Most Dangerous Place: Pakistan's Lawless Frontierdoesn't has a lot to recommend it, including helpful and information-packed appendices:

The book is remarkly timely, detailed, and closer to an insider perspective than most of what's out there. Like a good book should, it asks us to think and cautions against any simplistic notions of the "war on terror."

Here, for example, is some food for thought from the preface:

"In 2009, militants staged almost ninety suicide attaqcks and carried out another five hundred bombings and ambushes [in Pakistan:], killing over three thousand people."

"Between January 14, 2006, and April 8, 2009, CIA-operated Predators and drones conducted some sixty-one cross-border strikes. Only ten of these hit their actual targets, killing fourteen Al Qaeda leaders. In all, the drones took the lives of over seven hundred Pakistani civilians."

The preface goes on to describe how even "successful" interventions by Pakistani military have caused humanitarian crises due to the volume of refugees and to quote White House spokesman Robert Gibbs' cautionary pronouncement that "Solutions involving security in Pakistan don't include less democrarcy and less human rights" -- while offering no solutions.

How did we get here (and will knowing this help us get out)? Those are the questions asked in the rest of the book.
  hmajor | Jul 7, 2010 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

In this gripping and definitive exposé, Gul reveals the story of the dark side of the Afghan war--and tells how Pakistan has degenerated into a nuclear-armed powder keg.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 3
4.5
5

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 159,164,692 books! | Top bar: Always visible