HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Walton Ford

by Walton Ford

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None2,874,007NoneNone
Walton Ford's work hangs on the notion of legacy. As the descendant of slave owners, his own legacy began on a Nashville, Tennessee, plantation. From his reat grandmother's diary, The Autobiography of Emily Donelson Walton: ] 83^-1 ^36, came a stoiy, frightening in its naivete and abhorrent social attitudes. It is a story that is familiar to families across the South. Ford is belligerent about his legacy, which he ex- tends to encompass the history of America, from slavery in the South to the westward expansion. Recently, his focus has moved east to India, where the legacy of British imperialism still festers. Ford is masterful at loosening the underpinnings of the Western myth. In 1996 Ford was one of eight artists whose work comprised Heroic Painting, which I organized for SECCA. Currently on tour, the exhibition pits "new history," which elevates the disenfranchised to heroic status, against traditional history in examining our mj^hic heroes. For Ford, the connection between mjfth and legacy is pivotal. In this, his first one-person museum exhibition. Ford fully examines the issues that motivate his work. It is with great pleasure that SECCA again presents this important artist. Susan Lubowsky Talbott, Executive Director… (more)
Recently added byBrunhilda5, tylermuseumofart
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Walton Ford's work hangs on the notion of legacy. As the descendant of slave owners, his own legacy began on a Nashville, Tennessee, plantation. From his reat grandmother's diary, The Autobiography of Emily Donelson Walton: ] 83^-1 ^36, came a stoiy, frightening in its naivete and abhorrent social attitudes. It is a story that is familiar to families across the South. Ford is belligerent about his legacy, which he ex- tends to encompass the history of America, from slavery in the South to the westward expansion. Recently, his focus has moved east to India, where the legacy of British imperialism still festers. Ford is masterful at loosening the underpinnings of the Western myth. In 1996 Ford was one of eight artists whose work comprised Heroic Painting, which I organized for SECCA. Currently on tour, the exhibition pits "new history," which elevates the disenfranchised to heroic status, against traditional history in examining our mj^hic heroes. For Ford, the connection between mjfth and legacy is pivotal. In this, his first one-person museum exhibition. Ford fully examines the issues that motivate his work. It is with great pleasure that SECCA again presents this important artist. Susan Lubowsky Talbott, Executive Director

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

None

Quick Links

Genres

LC Classification

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,254,114 books! | Top bar: Always visible