HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Reign of Law: Marbury v. Madison and the…
Loading...

The Reign of Law: Marbury v. Madison and the Construction of America

by Professor Paul W. Kahn

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
15None647,891NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0300066791, Hardcover)

This is the first major work to apply to the rule of law the insights of modern cultural theory, ranging from Clifford Geertz to Michel Foucault. Starting from Thomas Paine's observation that "in America, law is king", Paul Kahn asks: What are the elements of our belief in the rule of law? And what are the rhetorical techniques by which the courts maintain this belief?

Kahn centers his exploration on the 1803 Supreme Court case of Marbury v. Madison -- still the greatest of our constitutional cases. Kahn shows that Marbury is the judicial response to President Thomas Jefferson's belief that his election represented a Second American Revolution. Kahn uses the confrontation between president and Court to analyze the contrasting ways in which the revolutionary and the legal imaginations understand and give shape to political events. This contest continues today in the conflicting demands we make for a politics that preserves the past yet celebrates popular innovation.

Kahn shows that the rule of law is our deepest political myth. It carries forward a Western religious tradition in which law appeared as divine revelation. We have secularized this conception, substituting the popular sovereign for the divine and revolution for revelation. Yet law's rule continues to appear to us as a representation of the sovereign's will made apparent in an extraordinary moment of revolution.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:01:51 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Yale University Press

2 editions of this book were published by Yale University Press.

Editions: 0300066791, 0300083920

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,541,714 books! | Top bar: Always visible