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Imperial Marriage: An Edwardian War and…
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Imperial Marriage: An Edwardian War and Peace

by Hugh Cecil

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0719560438, Hardcover)

Certain lives epitomize an age, its glamour, its successes, and its broken dreams. Such were the lives of Lord Edward Cecil, his wife Violet, and Alfred Milner with whom she fell in love. The adventurous Guards officer Edward Cecil married Violet Maxse in 1894, as Britain reached its imperial zenith. During the Boer War, as Chief Staff Officer to Baden-Powell, he was besieged at Mafeking, while in Cape Town Violet, young, attractive and enterprising, fell in love with Alfred Milner, the High Commissioner responsible for British policy. Her love for him dominated the rest of her life. This book is also a picture of the British aristocratic world during its last period of real influence. As Foreign Secretary and Prime Minister, Lord Edward's father, the Marquess of Salisbury, was Britain's leading statesman. His Jacobean palace, Hatfield, was a political powerhouse. Violet's father, Frederick Maxse was an unorthodox war hero and landed gentleman. His artistic and political friends, such as the statesman Georges Clemenceau, influenced her profoundly. Alfred Milner, a brilliant scholarship boy, rose to control the destinies of the nation alongside Lloyd George during World War I - a war bringing terrible personal tragedy to Violet and Edward. Edward spent his later life administering the finances of Egypt. After his death in 1918, Alfred and Violet were married for four brief, happy years.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:16 -0400)

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"Certain lives epitomize the spirit of an age, its glamour, its triumphs and its broken dreams. Such were the lives of the central figures of this book. Lord Edward Cecil, an adventurous Guards officer, married Violet Maxse in 1894 as Britain reached its imperial zenith. He fought alongside Kitchener in the Sudan, and during the Boer War in South Africa he served as Chief Staff Officer to Baden-Powell and was besieged in Mafeking. In Cape Town, the attractive and enterprising Violet became close to the man responsible for British policy, the High Commissioner Alfred Milner. Her love for him dominated the rest of her life." "Imperial Marriage is a picture of the British aristocratic world during its last period of real influence. As Foreign Secretary and Prime Minister, Lord Edward's father, the Marquess of Salisbury, was the leading statesman of the day. Edward was brought up in his family's magnificent Jacobean palace, Hatfield, a political powerhouse and a stronghold of the Anglican religion. Violet's family were very different and anti-religious. Her unorthodox father, Frederick Maxse, was a war hero and landed gentleman; his artistic and political friends, such as the French statesman Georges Clemenceau, vividly portrayed here, influenced her profoundly." "Alfred Milner, a brilliant scholarship boy, rose to become one of the most powerful men in the British Empire and to control the destinies of the nation alongside Lloyd George during the First World War - a war that brought terrible personal tragedy to the Cecils. Edward spent his later life administering the finances of Egypt. After his death in 1918, Alfred and Violet were married for four brief, happy years."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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