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Maya's Notebook by Isabel Allende
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Maya's Notebook (2011)

by Isabel Allende

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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4463623,454 (3.68)16
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English (24)  Spanish (9)  Dutch (3)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
This book was a bit of a departure from Allende’s earlier historical fiction. It takes place in the present and follows the life of a girl who falls deeply into the abyss of addiction and her journey to safety and healing on a small island off the coast of Chili. There are a few twists and turns making it an interesting combination of coming of age and drug underworld drama. SRH ( )
  StaffReads | May 27, 2014 |
This book was a bit of a departure from Allende’s earlier historical fiction. It takes place in the present and follows the life of a girl who falls deeply into the abyss of addiction and her journey to safety and healing on a small island off the coast of Chili. There are a few twists and turns making it an interesting combination of coming of age and drug underworld drama. ( )
  St.CroixSue | May 27, 2014 |
Is a very nice book. Pretty well right with a good story. Really enjoy reading it. ( )
  CaroPi | May 6, 2014 |
Gritty realistic, almost crime-style drama (but it was more character driven than plot driven- there are important and very INTERESTING plot points, it just isn't fast paced). There are some really hard violent scenes and sexual violence in this book. There are also beautiful parts like the descriptions of Southern Chile. Hopefully this book would be a warning to those teenagers playing with fire, but then again, they may not be spending time reading books by Isabel Allende. ( )
  GR8inD8N | Apr 24, 2014 |
This is the story of Maya Vidal who grows up in Berkeley, California but eventually ends up in Chilote, Chile. Abandoned by her parents as a baby, she is raised by her Chilean born grandmother and her husband (Popo) an astronomer at the university. Her childhood is idyllic until her beloved Popo dies of cancer. She feels abandoned by his death and she enters a rebellious period by skipping school, doing drugs and hanging out with unsavoury friends. Her behaviour alarms her grandmother and she is sent to a private facility inOregon. She manages to escape and ends up in Las Vegas where her life hits rock bottom.
The book is told in the present and the past. The present is her life spent in Chilote in Chile with her mother's friend Manuel. She has been sent here to escape the dangers and demons of her life in LV. Reluctant at first to enjoy the island, over time she grows to love the inhabitants and their customs. It gives her the opportunity to face her demons and to appreciate her circumstances.
This is a well told story with really interesting characters, in particular her grandmother Nini and her Popo. The ending is a little hard to believe but it is a story of the love of family and their ability to love you no matter what. ( )
  MaggieFlo | Apr 22, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
The prioritising of story over voice suggests that it's not the aim of Maya's Notebook to plunge the reader into the grim existence of a real-life Maya; this is a tale of revelations and resolutions, and the plot is more answerable to its own turns than to the brutal possibilities of reality. Despite the observations about the number of young people lost to street violence, crime and slavery, or because of them, the driving force of this novel is ultimately resilience – the power of love and acceptance to face down terrible things.
added by ozzer | editThe Guardian, Emily Perkins (May 30, 2013)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isabel Allendeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Degenaar, RikkieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn't everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?
-Mary Oliver, "The Summer Day"
Dedication
A los adolescentes de mi tribu: Alejandro, Andrea, Nicole, Sabrina, Aristotelis y Achilleas
For the teenagers of my tribe:
Alejandro, Andrea, Nicole, Sabrina, Aristotelis, and Achilleas
First words
A week ago my grandmother gave me a dry-eyed hug at the San Francisco airport and told me again that if I valued my life at all, I should not get in touch with anyone I knew until we could be sure my enemies were no longer looking for me.
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After the death of her beloved grandfather, nineteen-year-old Maya Vidal, turning to drugs, alcohol, and petty crimes, becomes trapped in a war between assassins, the police, the FBI, and Interpol, until her grandmother helps her escape to a remote island off the coast of Chile where she tries to make sense of her life.… (more)

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