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Enterprise: America's Fightingest Ship…
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Enterprise: America's Fightingest Ship and the Men Who Helped Win…

by Barrett Tillman

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Using extensive research and veteran interviews, Tillman shares the ins and outs of life aboard an aircraft carrier that fought in the Pacific Ocean Theater.
  mcmlsbookbutler | Sep 22, 2016 |
Actually didn't finish it. Listened to part of the book on CD. Is probably more appealing to a true war history buff, but for me, it was too many dates, facts and lists of names, lists of equipment, etc and not enough "human interest factor". I was going to push through and finish it, but opted not to. ( )
  KylaS | Feb 18, 2016 |
Finished February 2015 ( )
  anderton | Feb 26, 2015 |
Barrett Tillman has a fine reputation as a Navy historian and his books come highly recommended. I even tried reading his Clash of the Carriers, but that was back when I was still kind of new to reading histories and soon found myself over my head. But since that time I've come to appreciate and enjoy military histories much more (particularly WWII in the Pacific) and was excited to see this book. It's a history of the USS Enterprise, an aircraft carrier during World War II known as the "fightingest ship" due not only for the number of engagements it participated in, but more importantly for the specific battles "from Pearl Harbor almost to VJ Day." In less than ten years of service it served our country in the most important times and places.

But Tillman is a military man who writes for other military men. He speaks their language and connects with them in ways the rest of us can't possibly relate to. This is a history of the ship and those who crewed it, and while the many engagements (especially by flyers) are presented here, it felt like they were summarily told without much excitement or detail. I felt like I was awash in a sea of names at a someone else's family reunion. To be fair, those who may have served or had fathers who served on the Enterprise (or even on other Navy ships) will probably find this book an engrossing read, but I just couldn't get into it. I'm probably better off sticking with James Hornfischer and Ian Toll - that's a little more my speed. ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
Barrett Tillman has a fine reputation as a Navy historian and his books come highly recommended. I even tried reading his Clash of the Carriers, but that was back when I was still kind of new to reading histories and soon found myself over my head. But since that time I've come to appreciate and enjoy military histories much more (particularly WWII in the Pacific) and was excited to see this book. It's a history of the USS Enterprise, an aircraft carrier during World War II known as the "fightingest ship" due not only for the number of engagements it participated in, but more importantly for the specific battles "from Pearl Harbor almost to VJ Day." In less than ten years of service it served our country in the most important times and places.

But Tillman is a military man who writes for other military men. He speaks their language and connects with them in ways the rest of us can't possibly relate to. This is a history of the ship and those who crewed it, and while the many engagements (especially by flyers) are presented here, it felt like they were summarily told without much excitement or detail. I felt like I was awash in a sea of names at a someone else's family reunion. To be fair, those who may have served or had fathers who served on the Enterprise (or even on other Navy ships) will probably find this book an engrossing read, but I just couldn't get into it. I'm probably better off sticking with James Hornfischer and Ian Toll - that's a little more my speed. ( )
  J.Green | Aug 26, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
added by sjolly75 | editNaval History (Oct 1, 2012)
 
added by sjolly75 | editUS Naval Institute Proceedings, Paul J. Springer (Oct 1, 2012)
 
added by sjolly75 | editKirkus Reviews (Nov 15, 2011)
 
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The USS Enterprise took part in twenty battles during World War II--no other American ship came close. Enterprise is credited with sinking or wrecking 71 Japanese ships and destroying 911 enemy aircraft. This is the epic, heroic story of this legendary aircraft carrier--nicknamed "the fightingest ship" in the U.S. Navy--and of the men who fought and died on her. She was commissioned in 1938, and her bombers sank a submarine just three days after the Pearl Harbor attack, claiming the first seagoing Japanese vessel lost in the war. Barrett Tillman has been called "the man who owns naval aviation history." He's mined official records and oral histories as well as his own interviews to give us not only a portrait of the ship's unique contribution to winning the Pacific war, but also unforgettable portraits of the men who flew from her deck and worked behind the scenes to make success possible.--From publisher description.… (more)

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