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Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?…
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Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? (2014)

by Roz Chast

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9868812,487 (4.33)233

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English (86)  French (1)  All languages (87)
Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
This is an amazing book. Made me laugh, ..made me cry. I can totally relate my parents to Elizabeth and George. Caring for aging parents is difficult! Roz describes these emotions and thoughts with such honesty-fear, guilt, worries, anger, frustration and denial.
This book has definitely gotten me to think differently about old age and has brought me closer to my parents. Things that used to annoy me earlier, make me smile now. Thanks for publishing this book.
:) Just love this book! ( )
  deepa_nanjundaswamy | Aug 3, 2018 |
This is an amazing book. Made me laugh, ..made me cry. I can totally relate my parents to Elizabeth and George. Caring for aging parents is difficult! Roz describes these emotions and thoughts with such honesty-fear, guilt, worries, anger, frustration and denial.
This book has definitely gotten me to think differently about old age and has brought me closer to my parents. Things that used to annoy me earlier, make me smile now. Thanks for publishing this book.
:) Just love this book! ( )
  deepahn | Aug 3, 2018 |
True and touching. ( )
  ReadMeAnother | Jul 6, 2018 |
The story was full of memorable quotes. The quote that I liked best was: "I don't want to be a PULSATING PIECE OF PROTOPLASM!" The phrase speaks volumes when it comes to older relatives. ( )
  godmotherx5 | Apr 5, 2018 |
Roz Chast is an only child who had a rather unhappy childhood, moved from Brooklyn to Connecticut to have her own family, and never looked back. But now her parents are reaching 90 and are physically (her mother) and mentally (her father) declining. She now has to deal with their end-of-life care and all the drama that comes with it. In this memoir, by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, she chronicles that experience.

I really enjoyed this graphic novel memoir. Roz is no perfect daughter, and she's brutally honest about her mixed feelings, her rough relationship with her mother, and the challenges that she faces with her parents. Even though I'm the oldest of five and my parents have not yet had to deal with my parents' aging to the extent she does, I could relate to her ambivalence and the way families seem to refuse to communicate about important but daunting subjects such as aging. Who wants to talk about such things, after all? But it is an important topic, and her memoir is a sort of wake up call to that effect. ( )
  bell7 | Oct 3, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
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To my parents, George and Elizabeth
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So...do you guys ever think about...things?
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"In her first memoir, Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents, and a narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast's memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents. When it came to her elderly mother and father, Roz held to the practices of denial, avoidance, and distraction. But when Elizabeth Chast climbed a ladder to locate an old souvenir from the "crazy closet"--with predictable results--the tools that had served Roz well through her parents' seventies, eighties, and into their early nineties could no longer be deployed. While the particulars are Chast-ian in their idiosyncrasies--an anxious father who had relied heavily on his wife for stability as he slipped into dementia and a former assistant principal mother whose overbearing personality had sidelined Roz for decades--the themes are universal: adult children accepting a parental role; aging and unstable parents leaving a family home for an institution; dealing with uncomfortable physical intimacies; managing logistics; and hiring strangers to provide the most personal care" --… (more)

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