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The Trial by Jen Bryant
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The Trial (2004)

by Jen Bryant

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Another good book that can be used for reviewing or introducing poetry. I'm not sure if reading the book would catch younger readers attention. I did find the book to be a quick read and quite enjoyable. ( )
  rrobinson2 | Nov 20, 2013 |
Citation: Bryant, J. The trial. 2004. New York: Random House.
Grade Level: 6th- 12th
Category: Historical Fiction

Read Alouds:
Inside cover, it gives details to the Lindbergh trial.
19-20 A newspaper clipping about the search for the baby.
32-35 Getting a chance to work on the trial and Christmas.
50-53 At Uncle Jeff’s
79-80 The stars arrive.

Summary: This story is Katie Leigh Flynn’s detailing of the Lindbergh trial for her uncle because of his unforeseen accident. Katie has to see the pictures, the defendant, and the prosecutor, and still have an unbiased opinion about everything. Katie had to struggle with her mom to come to the trial, but after all was said and done, she had the best summer of her life dealing with the only thing that has ever happened in Flemington, New Jersey.

Theme: Always expect the unexpected, especially when it comes to the law. Katie saw so much, and yet, she still thought that the world was a perfect place.

Discussion Questions:
1. Richard Bruno was the man on trial. What did the prosecutor have against him?
2. How and why did Flemington change after this trial?

Reader Response: This book was hard to read and would be hard to teach based on Bryant’s style of writing. Each page has a new heading with a new subject matter, and it is very hard to deal with not knowing what has already happened and what is to come. The book also is split into three parts and an epilogue—none of which have anything to do with each other. Although this book has a lot of history in it, I would not choose to teach it under any circumstances. ( )
  AMarieRousseau | Jul 16, 2008 |
An interesting narrative choice -- a novel on poem form. I am not sure how the format and the subject mesh. That would be interested to find out. But I enjoyed her poetic style -- she uses line breaks very well. ( )
  snobles | Jun 28, 2008 |
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Epigraph
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

--T. S. Eliot
Dedication
For Eileen and Jerry S., and for David K.
First words
I've lived in this town my whole life,
and I can tell you...
nothing ever happens.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0440419867, Paperback)

Imagine you are Bruno Richard Hauptmann, accused of murdering the son of the most famous man in America.

In a compelling, immediate voice, 12-year-old Katie Leigh Flynn takes us inside the courtroom of the most widely publicized criminal case of the 20th century: the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh’s baby son. And in doing so, she reveals the real-life figures of the trial—the accused, the lawyers, the grieving parents—and the many faces of justice.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:00:58 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Living in Flemington, New Jersey, in 1935, twelve-year-old Katie Leigh Flynn describes, in a series of poems, the effect on her small town of the ongoing trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh's baby son.

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