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When I Grow Up, I Will Win the Nobel Peace…
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When I Grow Up, I Will Win the Nobel Peace Prize

by Isabel Pin

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In my opinion the character in this book is a driven, caring and hopeful young boy aspiring to do great things in this world. The language in the story is clear but the writing and illustrations in my opinion was somewhat unclear. It was not until I read the summary of the story, that everything the boy wanted to do was the opposite of what he was going through. The boy states, "He will give aid to people who need it," and "He will be brave in difficult situations." He wants to do these things because he has trouble standing up to greedy classmates and that he has trouble being brave in difficult situations. As I read the story, I perceived the story to be an aspiring young boy who just wants to help the world become a better place. Though the illustrations did't fit the style of the written text. The illustrations show the opposite of what the text is saying.
The concept of the story is great for children because it discusses many small or large ways they can help create a better community or world. The boy is trying to show that even though he says he wants to do all these great things, it's hard to know how to begin working towards one's aspirations. ( )
  cwierz2 | Feb 9, 2015 |
Just ok, doesn't seem quite complete somehow. ( )
  elpowers | Dec 16, 2011 |
Pin, Isabel. When I grow up, I will win the Nobel Peace Prize (Nancy Straus,
Trans.). Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2006.

When the boy in this story grows up, he plans to do good deeds and be given the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of his efforts. Right now, however, he is having a hard time getting started on making the right choices.

The pictures in the story are very unique in that they show the boy doing the exact opposite of his “when I grow up” plan. Most of the illustrations are full page illustrations on the right hand page; however, a few of them begin on the left hand page.

Children who are 7-10 year old would especially enjoy this book. Seven year olds are developing a sense of justice and older students show concern for others, are developing a sense of values, and are interested in problems of the world. They will be able to relate to the boy in the story who is struggling to make the right choice. Younger students may need the teacher to point out that the illustrations are the opposite of what the text says. Older students will appreciate this humorous aspect of the story. As an extension activity, younger students can discuss better choices that the boy could have made an older students can research the Nobel Peace Prize and why past and current winners have received the award.
  cdl | Sep 10, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374383138, Hardcover)

The boy in this book is having trouble admitting - much less closing - the large gap between his aspirations and his everyday actions. This boy knows that when he's older he will love his neighbor, but for now he's all too happy to pick on his sister. This boy even knows that one day he will be given the Nobel Peace Prize: for standing up to bullies, helping the poor, protecting animals and the environment - for all his good deeds. But with his bold claims continually contrasted by pictures that tell a very different story, even this boy eventually has to admit it's time to stop boasting and take the first step.
 
With cheeky artwork that offers a great big reality check to the high-minded protagonist, this book uses humor to underscore the importance - and the difficulty - of trying to live up to our own ideals.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:16 -0400)

A young boy thinks of what he can do to fight injustice in the world.

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