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The City of Florence: Historical Vistas and Personal Sightings (1995)

by R. W. B. Lewis

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1933101,793 (3.85)4
"In this deeply personal and learned labor of love, R.W.B. Lewis, acclaimed chronicler of such great American cosmopolitans as Edith Wharton and Henry James, provides a new look at the glories of Florence, the smallish Tuscan city which has been a prime source for modern Western culture and which has also been his second home for the past fifty years. In chapters dense with historical detail and personal reflection, Lewis reconsiders the principal focal points of this much-beloved city - the Arno, the Duomo, the Ponte Vecchio, Santa Croce - and casts new light on Florence's cultural patrimony and civic legacy from the Middle Ages to the present. With a scholar's eye and a lover's passion, he invites us to share his vision of a city and the way of life it has engendered and inspired."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved… (more)

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A fine if nostalgic look at Florence from an acclaimed American biographer and member of the 20th century transcontinental elite who lived in Florence and Connecticut. I need to return to smell the stones. ( )
  JayLivernois | May 28, 2018 |
This is a really nicely written history/memoir on Florence. I read this just before my (absolutely wonderful) visit there in 2000, and it made the city so much richer for me. Lewis does a terrific job of mixing the history, the architecture, and the art with the city geography and current feel of the city. ( )
  dchaikin | May 10, 2008 |
This is a must-read for anyone planning to visit, or anyone who has been there and fell in love with Firenze. I loved, loved, loved, loved this book. ( )
1 vote VenusofUrbino | Nov 25, 2007 |
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"In this deeply personal and learned labor of love, R.W.B. Lewis, acclaimed chronicler of such great American cosmopolitans as Edith Wharton and Henry James, provides a new look at the glories of Florence, the smallish Tuscan city which has been a prime source for modern Western culture and which has also been his second home for the past fifty years. In chapters dense with historical detail and personal reflection, Lewis reconsiders the principal focal points of this much-beloved city - the Arno, the Duomo, the Ponte Vecchio, Santa Croce - and casts new light on Florence's cultural patrimony and civic legacy from the Middle Ages to the present. With a scholar's eye and a lover's passion, he invites us to share his vision of a city and the way of life it has engendered and inspired."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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