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1421: The Year China Discovered America by…
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1421: The Year China Discovered America

by Gavin Menzies

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2,524773,464 (3.27)61
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Showing 1-5 of 72 (next | show all)
I listened to this as an audiobook from the library. Because he kept saying that further research would be published on a website for the book, I opened Google. Heads up: There is a significant effort out there by professional historians to debunk this book. There was a BBC program called “Junk History” that was all about the problems with this book. ( )
  3wheeledlibrarian | Dec 18, 2017 |
Although the thesis has been disputed, this is a fascinating read about how China could have discovered the New World and circumnavigated the world before the Europeans. It had the resources and navigational skills, and the author puts together tantalizing clues, including wrecks of Chinese junks (the huge sailboats that travelled long distances), genetic & cultural clues in the Americas, and archeological finds. ( )
  sylliu | Mar 27, 2017 |
Originally it sounded like an interesting book (and for only 1$ at a book fair, why not) and the beginning was a good and interesting and quick read..... ....but then things quickly soured. As you get further in and further in you realize its much more speculation than fact, the pages skip into 10s/20s/30s before you see citations, and it comes down to things like "Well you see I was in a submarine once, so when you look out a periscope... which is what the water level would have been in 1421" and it just goes downhill from there. Around page 250 or so I became more piqued about how he might have ascertained his speculations and others thoughts on this; more so than the constant hammer-over-the-head approach of how he viewed Chinese civilization and their voyages and how pathetic Europe was; so looking up GoodReads and Wikipedia as a start and Google and going from there - you find his main prediction which he used to launch his book was based on a fake map.... and that he wrecked the submarine and was forced to resign thereafter. Needless to say; all credibility is immediately shot right there. I finished the book, but I definitely recommend anyone who reads this to do their own studying and see how much of a crack-pot theorist this man is. ( )
3 vote BenKline | Oct 1, 2015 |
Interesting book but very speculative. The author provides very little evidence for hypotheses presented after the first third or so of the book. I would like to find a current book that provides followup evidence on the hypotheses from other researchers. ( )
1 vote Freeoperant | Jun 24, 2015 |
Menzies makes the fascinating argument that the Chinese discovered the Americas a full 70 years before Columbus. Not only did the Chinese discover America first, but they also, according to the author, established a number of subsequently lost colonies in the Caribbean. Furthermore, he asserts that the Chinese circumnavigated the globe, desalinated water, and perfected the art of cartography. In fact, he believes that most of the renowned European ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Tutter | Feb 20, 2015 |
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This book is dedicated to my beloved wife Marcella, who has travelled with me on the journeys related in this book and through life.
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On 2 February 1421, China dwarfed every nation on earth.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 006054094X, Paperback)

On March 8, 1421, the largest fleet the world had ever seen set sail from China. Its mission was "to proceed all the way to the ends of the earth to collect tribute from the barbarians beyond the seas" and unite the whole world in Confucian harmony.

When it returned in October 1423, the emperor had fallen, leaving China in political and economic chaos. The great ships were left to rot at their moorings and the records of their journeys were destroyed. Lost in China's long, self-imposed isolation that followed was the knowledge that Chinese ships had reached America seventy years before Columbus and had circumnavigated the globe a century before Magellan. Also concealed was how the Chinese colonized America before the Europeans and transplanted in America and other countries the principal economic crops that have fed and clothed the world.

Unveiling incontrovertible evidence of these astonishing voyages, 1421 rewrites our understanding of history. Our knowledge of world exploration as it has been commonly accepted for centuries must now be reconceived due to this landmark work of historical investigation.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:43 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

On March 8, 1421, the largest fleet the world had ever seen set sail from China "to the ends of the earth". When it returned in October 1423, the emperor had fallen, leaving China in political and economic chaos. The great ships were left to rot at their moorings and the records of their journeys were destroyed. Lost in China's long, self-imposed isolation that followed was the knowledge that the Chinese had reached America seventy years before Columbus and had circumnavigated the globe a century before Magellan. They had colonized America before the Europeans and had transplanted in America and other countries the principal economic crops that have fed and clothed the world.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

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