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The Malcontent by John Marston
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The Malcontent

by John Marston

Other authors: John Webster

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 3 of 3
A weirdly post-modern play that was pretty funny. ( )
  Sareene | Oct 22, 2016 |
This is one of the plays we were supposed to read in a revenge tragedy course that I took, but after I had purchased it, the professor dropped it from the syllabus in favor of Titus Andronicus. My interest in Tudor revenge tragedy was sparked by the (brilliant) cinematic adaptation of The Revenger's Tragedy, and none of the other examples of the genre have ever quite lived up to that one-- full of wit, melancholy, and cheerful violence. (Well, Hamlet is better, of course, but it's not exactly a typical revenge tragedy.) Still, I was looking forward to this one, but as I was reading it, I was struck by the fact it sure was taking a while for the revenging to happen. Well, it never did. Marston wrote a subversive take on the genre, where everyone reconciles in the end. I don't know if it was good or not; I just wanted my bloodbath! (originally written January 2008)
  Stevil2001 | Feb 4, 2008 |
Extremely funny in the way the complex plot comes together at the end. To me, the best of this series of revivals. ( )
  antiquary | Aug 28, 2007 |
Showing 3 of 3
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» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Marstonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Webster, Johnsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kay, W. DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0713642882, Paperback)

"This Malevole is one of the most prodigious affections that ever conversed with nature: a man, or rather a monster, more discontent than Lucifer."





The Malcontent is a striking example of the new satiric tone and moral seriousness in English comedy of the early 1600s. The play's vision of a fallen humanity driven by lust and ambition is created partly by its depiction of Machiavellian intrigue in the court of Genoa, and partly by the disaffected Malevole, the malcontent of the title, who is actually the deposed Duke Altofronto in disguise. Marston's tragi-comedy is full of reversals, surprises and moral transformations and offers a thin disguise for the Jacobean court and its vices.




This new student edition contains a lengthy new Introduction with background on the author, date and sources, theme, critical interpretation and stage history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:22 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"This Malevole is one of the most prodigious affections that ever conversed with nature: a man, or rather a monster, more discontent than Lucifer." The Malcontent is a striking example of the new satiric tone and moral seriousness in English comedy of the early 1600s. The play's vision of a fallen humanity driven by lust and ambition is created partly by its depiction of Machiavellian intrigue in the court of Genoa, and partly by the disaffected Malevole, the malcontent of the title, who is actually the deposed Duke Altofronto in disguise. Marston's tragi-comedy is full of reversals, surprises and moral transformations and offers a thin disguise for the Jacobean court and its vices. This new student edition contains a lengthy new Introduction with background on the author, date and sources, theme, critical interpretation and stage history.… (more)

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