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Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's…
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Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement

by Sally McMillen

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Part of the Oxford Pivotal Moments in American History series - covers the nascent women’s rights movement up to the Seneca Falls convention in 1848, and then the subsequent efforts to attain rights through the 1890s. Centers around four leading women in the movement: Lucy Stone, Elizabeth Caddy Stanton, Lucretia Coffin Mott, and Susan B. Anthony. A chapter on the social, legal, political, and religious realities for women is followed by one on the Convention, and then the split of the movement and eventual reunification. Special attention is paid to the movement’s relation to the abolition and temperance movements. Some talk of birth control and prostitution, and a sex scandal. Annoying habit of only referring to the major four women by their first names.
  chosler | Jan 14, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0195182650, Hardcover)

In a quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the woman's rights movement and change the course of history. The implications of that remarkable convention would be felt around the world and indeed are still being felt today.

In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Woman's Rights Movement, the latest contribution to Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments in American History series, Sally McMillen unpacks, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840-1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the lasting and transformative effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time--and destined to be thus regarded by the future historian." In this lively and warmly written study, Sally McMillen may well be the future historian Anthony was hoping to find.

A vibrant portrait of a major turning point in American women's history, and in human history, this book is essential reading for anyone wishing to fully understand the origins of the woman's rights movement.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:44 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"In the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the women's rights movement and change the course of history. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Sally McMillen reveals the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book focuses on four extraordinary figures--Mott, Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony--telling the stories of their lives, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the far-reaching effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time"--Cover, p. 4.… (more)

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