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Outbreak! Plagues That Changed History by…
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Outbreak! Plagues That Changed History

by Bryn Barnard

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This connects history and science by giving brief overviews of how major disease have shifted the course of history. The illustrations help to illuminate some of the more difficult concepts and paint a vibrant picture of the historical setting of each disease. The following epidemics are discussed, the Black Death, smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, tuberculosis, and influenza. In addition to a very frank outline of the societal causes of each epidemic, the scientific discoveries that followed are discussed. The book ends with a few predictions of how human history will be affected by pathogens in the future. ( )
  mwestholz | Jan 19, 2016 |
A wonderfully fascinating, if too short, look at several of the major plagues that shaped the world we live in. From the Black Death that created a middle class from the ashes of the old feudal order to how Europeans conquered the New World, only with the aid of their valuable "ally" Smallpox to the Spanish Flu that influenced the peace at the end of World War I, thereby setting the stage for World War II. Any of those morons who don't vaccinate their kids, should be forced to read this book and others like it. Do they really want to go back to the world of less than a century ago? What would the sufferers of Typhus or Yellow Fever say to these morons? Which world would "they" rather live in? The road to the mostly disease-free society we live in is paved with the skulls of plague victims and lined with tombstones. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 4, 2015 |
A wonderfully fascinating, if too short, look at several of the major plagues that shaped the world we live in. From the Black Death that created a middle class from the ashes of the old feudal order to how Europeans conquered the New World, only with the aid of their valuable "ally" Smallpox to the Spanish Flu that influenced the peace at the end of World War I, thereby setting the stage for World War II. Any of those morons who don't vaccinate their kids, should be forced to read this book and others like it. Do they really want to go back to the world of less than a century ago? What would the sufferers of Typhus or Yellow Fever say to these morons? Which world would "they" rather live in? The road to the mostly disease-free society we live in is paved with the skulls of plague victims and lined with tombstones. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |
A wonderfully fascinating, if too short, look at several of the major plagues that shaped the world we live in. From the Black Death that created a middle class from the ashes of the old feudal order to how Europeans conquered the New World, only with the aid of their valuable "ally" Smallpox to the Spanish Flu that influenced the peace at the end of World War I, thereby setting the stage for World War II. Any of those morons who don't vaccinate their kids, should be forced to read this book and others like it. Do they really want to go back to the world of less than a century ago? What would the sufferers of Typhus or Yellow Fever say to these morons? Which world would "they" rather live in? The road to the mostly disease-free society we live in is paved with the skulls of plague victims and lined with tombstones. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |
A wonderfully fascinating, if too short, look at several of the major plagues that shaped the world we live in. From the Black Death that created a middle class from the ashes of the old feudal order to how Europeans conquered the New World, only with the aid of their valuable "ally" Smallpox to the Spanish Flu that influenced the peace at the end of World War I, thereby setting the stage for World War II. Any of those morons who don't vaccinate their kids, should be forced to read this book and others like it. Do they really want to go back to the world of less than a century ago? What would the sufferers of Typhus or Yellow Fever say to these morons? Which world would "they" rather live in? The road to the mostly disease-free society we live in is paved with the skulls of plague victims and lined with tombstones. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375829865, Hardcover)

Did the Black Death destroy the feudal system? Did cholera pave the way for modern Manhattan? Did yellow fever help end the slave trade? Remarkably, the answer to all of these questions is yes. Time and again, diseases have impacted the course of human history in surprisingly powerful ways. From influenza to small pox, from tuberculosis to yellow fever, Bryn Barnard describes the symptoms and paths of the world’s worst diseases–and how the epidemics they spawned have changed history forever.

Highlighted with vivid and meticulously researched illustrations, Outbreak is a fascinating look at the hidden world of microbes–and how this world shapes human destiny every day.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:49 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Describes symptoms and paths of deadly diseases that have impacted the course of human history.

» see all 2 descriptions

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