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From Beirut to Jerusalem by Thomas L.…
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From Beirut to Jerusalem (1989)

by Thomas L. Friedman

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  cavlibrary | Jun 18, 2013 |
I abandoned this book back in April 2011...I made it to the part where he goes to Jerusalem (took me two weeks to get that far) and then I'm guessing I found more interesting books to read. While I do want to finish one day, it's time (Jan 2012) to remove it from my currently reading shelf. ( )
  melissarochelle | Apr 5, 2013 |
It was an Israeli friend who told me that if I wanted to understand today's Middle East, I should read this book. The author is well-qualified as a guide to the region’s complexities. Friedman, who is Jewish and studied Hebrew as a child, as a teen spent a vacation in an Israeli Kibbutz. He started studying Arabic as well, and fell in love with Egypt after a two-week visit on his way to a semester at Hebrew University. Less than two years later he was taking Arabic courses at the American University in Cairo. After college he earned a Masters at Oxford in Middle Eastern Studies: then, he became a reporter. In Beirut. In the midst of their civil war. He’d spend almost five years there, winning a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of the massacre at Sabra and Shatilia camps. When American marines were slaughtered in their Beirut barracks, Friedman was on scene watching the bomb’s mushroom cloud rise overhead. He’d then spend almost four years as the Jerusalem Bureau Chief for the New York Times.

I’ve read criticisms of Friedman’s style as risible, with mixed metaphors and outlandish analogies. I didn’t really notice in the Beirut portion of the book, and I usually do. I think it’s that the story he had to tell was so riveting, I didn’t trip up on that--I just glided right through. When you’re reading about an Israeli officer being confronted in Beirut with three boxes, one filled with heads, another with torsos and another with limbs or read of how the parrot at the bar of the Commodore Hotel rendered a “perfect imitation of the whistle of an incoming shell,” it’s not style that draws your attention. I certainly found this book very readable and well-paced in that first half of the book. I admit I did start noticing the plethora of analogies in the Jerusalem portion. Maybe because a Hobbesian hell like Beirut rivets your attention more than the stories of a functioning democracy. Maybe it’s that the Beirut portions seemed more built on personal experience and observations, while the Jerusalem portions more based on interviews with others. Maybe it’s that his stylistic tics, as some reviewers suggest, increased over time and the Beirut portions were based on material written earlier. For whatever reason, I did find the second half of the book less compelling, and the style much more irksome.

Friedman seemed to me very even-handed. He certainly took to task not just Arabs, but the Israelis and the Americans for a generous share of the blame. Some reviewers pegged him as a Neo-Con, but given his insistence there will be no peace until Israeli settlers are withdrawn from the West Bank, his account of the Israeli occupation there, and his criticism of the Reagan and first Bush administrations, he hardly came across to me that way, and the Goodreads bio taken from the Wiki described him as "left-leaning." I don't think he's so easily labeled, at least not in this book. He identifies three forces that drive much of the madness of the Middle East, and interestingly it isn’t religion, or at least religion per se, which he blames. Even when it comes to Islamic Fundamentalism, he believes it “is at root a secular socioeconomic problem.” He points to three conflicting and competing forces: tribalism, authoritarianism, and nationalism--particularly in the context of how the colonial powers drew very artificial lines when in the aftermath of World War I the Middle Eastern states were established.

I may not always agree with Friedman's analysis or his solutions, but certainly his account of his time in the Middle East makes for a good primer on the nations of the Middle East and their conflicts, even though almost a quarter of a century has passed since the original publication. And the 2012 edition I read had an interesting Afterword on the events that have passed since, particularly Friedman’s thoughts on the Arab Spring and its opportunities and dangers. This may not be the last word on the subject of the contemporary Middle East, but it’s not a bad place to start. ( )
  LisaMaria_C | Feb 28, 2013 |
In Thomas Friedman's award winning book, we learn why the Middle East is so messed up. Friedman takes us from Minnesota to Beirut, where he is stationed as the Middle East correspondent for the New York Times. He lands in the middle of a complex civil war between Maronites, Sunni, Druse, and Shia motivated by a fight for political control of the minority Maronite over the majority Shia. We witness a naive American attempt to safeguard a peaceful end to the war only to see them get caught in the crossfire and leave in disgrace. We also see Israelis invade to defeat Yassir Arafat who has taken refuge there, but which leads to a mini- holocaust of Palestinians overseen by the Israelis in Southern Lebanon. After nearly being killed several times, Friedman escapes to Jerusalem.

The second half of this story is more an essay than a story about the Israeli Palestinian conflict. Friedman does a good job detailing the complicated and tenuous position of the Israeli state to establish democracy, Israeli rule, and security. It seems these features cannot all be had at once. Can a religious state be democratic? Can the majority Palestinians live peacefully in a state ruled by minority Israelis?

This book is well written and easy to follow. It makes the complex middle east situation accessible. ( )
  mrminjares | Aug 15, 2012 |
NO OF PAGES: 541 SUB CAT I: Political History SUB CAT II: Arab-Israeli Conflict SUB CAT III: DESCRIPTION: The author attempts to present the Arab and Israeli versions of the middle-east conflict, bringing out the complexity and enormity of the problem, to give one a flavor of the dilemma. In the end he escapes back to the safety of the US, leaving problems behindNOTES: SUBTITLE:
  BeitHallel | Feb 18, 2011 |
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For my parents, Harold and Margaret Friedman
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In June 1979, my wife, Ann, and I boarded a red-and-white Middle East Airlines 707 in Geneva for the four-hour flight to Beirut.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385413726, Paperback)

Winner of the 1989 National Book Award for nonfiction, this extraordinary bestseller is still the most incisive, thought-provoking book ever written about the Middle East. Thomas L. Friedman, twice winner of the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, and now the Foreign Affairs columnist on the op-ed page of the New York Times, drew on his ten years in the Middle East to write a book that The Wall Street Journal called "a sparkling intellectual guidebook... an engrossing journey not to be missed." Now with a new chapter that brings the ever-changing history of the conflict in the Middle East up to date, this seminal historical work reaffirms both its timeliness and its timelessness. "If you're only going to read one book on the Middle East, this is it." -- Seymour Hersh. "From Beirut To Jerusalem is the most intelligent and comprehensive account one is likely to read." -- New York Times Book Review.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:41:35 -0400)

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Examines Israeli-Palestinian relations, the PLO, Israeli politics, Lebanese factions, news reporting from the Middle East, and other issues of the Middle East.

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