HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Sherlock Holmes: The rediscovered railway…
Loading...

Sherlock Holmes: The rediscovered railway mysteries and other stories (2010)

by John Taylor

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
346513,761 (3.38)12
John Taylor presents a collection of short stories featuring legendary sleuth Sherlock Holmes.

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Benedict Cumberbatch might read obituaries or the phone book and I'd still sit back and enjoy it. Here he's reading four Sherlock Holmes stories, which are very entertaining. ( )
  JulesGDSide | Nov 29, 2018 |
The stories were enjoyable and entertaining. Sherlock Holmes is, by far, my favorite fictional character. I have read/listened/watched nearly every adaptation of the character. I have listened to Basil Rathbone's audio readings, which were good.

I must say Benedit Cumberbatch does an excellent job at the voices of all of the characters within each story. He did a good impression of an American, with only a few word pronunciation slips that are not typical of an American (I know, I'm picky). Still, he did a wonderful job.

I would definitely buy more Sherlock Holmes audio books if Cumberbatch narrates. ( )
  santaflash | Jan 2, 2018 |
Let's begin with the reason most are going to listen to this: Benedict Cumberbatch. Although it is currently Martin Freeman that is thought of as the voice of John Watson, Benedict is an excellent choice here. The voice acting is excellent, and I find myself relaxing into this quickly. It also caused me me to forgive a great deal of the stories the first few listens. I will try to not destroy the entire plot mostly, but that last story is impossible to explain the full level of broken without ripping the entire plot apart.

Case 1: An Inscrutable Masquerade

I love Benedict Cumberbatch; so I am willing to accept a few odd pronunciations. Lestrade's name is said wrong. It's not the only odd one, but it isthe one that tends to make me most amused despite breaking my immersion. This is by far my favorite of the four, and it is the one I have been able to poke the least holes through.

I find Holmes lack of trust and communication with Watson illogical. Watson's inability to follow through on promises for even 24 hours is odd. I also find his inability to figure out he needed to get himself a drink was rather off. Surely the former army doctor is capable of figuring out how to get himself something to drink when thirsty.

When it comes to the Watson double, I wonder how he isn't obvious to at least the friend that knows Watson so well. Watson and the double should be clearly different heights.

Case 2: The Conundrum of Coach 13

This one fails mainly in the fact it tries too hard to be super smart and pun filled at the same time. Granted, the puns are a character trait, but it still tries too hard. Red hair ring - red herring, sheer luck holmes... Holmes is not the only one sick of the puns before the set up is done. I do like the idea of how the crime is pulled off outside of the insertion of the guard, as I find it hard to believe that aspect of the tale. I do feel Watson ' s disappointment and frustration over the criminal "master mind's" punishment, but it is believable at the same time.

Case 3: The Trinity Vicarage Larceny

This one is probably my least favorite over all even though the last story is the most disastrous plot wise. This one felt more like the story was trying to appear difficult while putting no effort into the story. The characters were less than thought out. The format for working through the details were bland and obtuse, even from Holmes himself. Watson is far too dim to follow along a basic train of thought. I mean the story repeatedly mentions the money was locked up, but Watson doesn't understand why no one mentioning a key is a problem. They mention just how limited the access to a key for the locks is, and yet he never once questioned how the "stranger" got into the locked crypt without damaging anything. He never once thought about boots with laces got removed by hands covered in paint so why was all the paint on the boots restricted to the soles. He never questions the timing involved in the story, which I have some issues with even with the solution. I mean how is someone in two places at once visually and yet believed to have robbed the crypt at the exact same time? Why doesn't anyone question not seeing this stranger now robber when he should have been visible for the description of the grounds given in various parts of this tale?

Case 4: The 10:59 Assassin

This case is the major deal breaker for me. If you don't want a detailed run through of this case and it's flaws, the spoiler free version is listen to the timing of everything and watch it fall apart.

This starts out fair enough, someone from a past case contacting for more assistance - the usual father having to find a way to save his son from being shafted by the justice system. Watson and Holmes rush off to help the said writer of the letter. They get to the location the day after the crime, but the body wasn't found until the next day nor was the son arrested until he returned the day after the crime. How did this father's letter not only arrive the morning all this is found, but Holmes and Watson arrived that morning as well by train?

Now, I'm going to gloss over the arrogant cop that just thinks he's too great because his stupidity isn't unexpected. The sudden dawning of the son having a fiancé whom he saw with a curious "bundle" when Holmes asks if the boy has any close connection to anyone other than his father (despite having heard about said fiancé from the father already) is a little over the top to be polite.

The horse is a kicker for me having grow up around them. At this point the talk back and forth had me thinking it was more like a couple of days the first time I heard it, so why they left the tack on the animal was beyond explaination. Even with it being the late afternoon the day after the crime, it is illogical for the horse to still have it's tack on. The wound on it's leg is fresh, but it was tied to a post. The excuse seems off though as it would have been limited in its reach along with it shouldn't be bothered by the train whistle if it's heard it for it's apparently long life as Watson makes a comment about the stallion would have been a force when it was young. It would logically be stressed having been near a dying and dead body over the night, especially tied next to it in what must be partly woods.

The story starts breaking apart more and more as the details build if you can ignore the fact that a time lord is needed for the morning to work. Prepare for timey-wimey messes here. So, the fiancé tells her tale of trying to wave goodbye to the train at 11 o'clock at night at a distance from a bridge and finding the dead, possibly for hours, body. She hears no gun shot, and the horse is never mentioned. The train left at 10:59 pm, goes to the bridge, and waits for the train that makes it into the station at 11:10 pm. That train blows it's whistle to make sure the 10:59 is not in its way. This would mean that the bridge should be no more than 5 minutes from the station.

We have Holmes getting the train delayed by 10 minutes, at the 7 minute mark he asks to go onto thetracks to examine the rail car, the 11:10 train whistle blows seconds after Holmes gets onto the tracks only to pull into the station 30 seconds later. Train whistles were not heard prior to that which means it couldn't have been blown before the bridge as they reach quite a distance.

Okay, so we now have the bridge being non-existent as the whistle blew just outside the station. Time to hit the detailed solution.

Our buddy Jack, the son, was with his father the entire day at the pub. His father took him to the train, and he got on the train to go get a suit for his upcoming wedding. At the bridge, Jack and the GP that rides the train nightly see a mysterious flash of light out the window. This flash is caused by the firing of a gun supposedly hit my the horse's foreleg (the fresh wound) knocking the aim off. This causes the bullet to hit the rail car's wheel and rebound into the man's head. The train then moves to cross the bridge for its turn which is when the fiancé shows up to wave in the dark and finds the "long dead" body that should have been bleeding heavily considering it is a fresh head wound. She takes the freshly fired gun not realizing it isn't Jack's to hide it to protect him as she is blaming the poor guy too. The next morning, the police picked Jack up when he got off the train.

Now, Watson and Holmes mention the wound would not have killed him instantly and hopefully he learned the error of his ways in the bleak hour. This means not only should she have heard a gunshot, but he should have been vocal and able to move as well. The speech center is not front and center nor are a lot of the sections for movement. It was a shallow wound by the story. And why does she not mention a horse that would have been fighting to get loose from a post or going out of its mind? It would seem hard to miss or forget.

So, for me the voices for narration make up for all the lack of substance, but that has to do with the voice is calming which helps me sleep. If it were totally based on the stories, I would have to give give this a 1 as I wouldn't bother to repeat it for all the gaping holes. It's amazing the difference a voice can make.

How many time Lord's does it take to fix the time issues in this audio CD, the world may never know... ( )
  selbarton | Apr 17, 2017 |
I swear I reviewed this one!

Anyway, I recommended this one to someone who wanted some audiobooks read by Benedict Cumberbatch (hi, Vanessa~!) and that is precisely why I picked up this book.

It was a bit surreal having Benedict Cumberbatch speak as John Watson, the narrator, but I still loved it. I love all the stories. I'm a Sherlock Holmes fan, and nothing will ever change that, let's be real.

Some of the stories (one of them, in particular) I really, really liked, and some others felt a little bit too formulaic but that clearly didn't stop me from reading.

The version of myself a few years ago thought she would only ever read the Arthur Conan Doyle stories, but I'm glad I've moved on from that because there are a wealth of adaptions that I can explore, including this one.

So if you like Sherlock Holmes, check this one out. Me? I'll just keep reading Sherlock Holmes adaptions until the end of my days. ( )
  lydia1879 | Aug 31, 2016 |
Four new Sherlock Holmes stories by John Taylor. Uneven. Two were amazing, one was passable and one was just not very good. Worth a look and your time if you have nothing else around. ( )
  ferrisscottr | Jun 18, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Taylorprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cumberbatch, BenedictNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.38)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 7
3.5 3
4 3
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 142,548,032 books! | Top bar: Always visible