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From the Earth to the Moon / Round the Moon…
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From the Earth to the Moon / Round the Moon

by Jules Verne

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431535,411 (3.65)6

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Showing 5 of 5
This is only about 25% a novel (or really two novels), and 75% an excuse to show off calculations and scientific knowledge. Then again, this is hardly the first science fiction novel I've read with that problem. If there are any characters, my favorite character is J.T. Marston, over-enthusiastic, clumsy, ridiculous, and generally very endearing.
  jen.e.moore | Sep 25, 2015 |
Yes, this is an old classic, so the science is a bit dated as are the views, actions and behaviour of the characters. But this is still fun to read. It is a bit slow and over-burdened in places with descriptions of everything, from Florida to the Moon, but the dialogue is also sometimes fun and quirky. This is a slightly comical book as Verne pokes fun at the American ideal of enterprise and offsets it with the more stuffy response from Britain and Europe. You can understand why Steampunk and the Victorian age appeal so strongly when you read classics of the time like this. They have such potential. Engaging! ( )
1 vote dgr2 | Mar 24, 2012 |
While it is an interesting scientific predictor, the book bogs down frequently with many calculations and much discussion of theories about the moon from that time. ( )
  mullinator52 | Dec 7, 2010 |
The Baltimore Gun Club decides the next target they will be shooting at will be the moon. They club sends a notice to the town to help them earn money to build a gun big enough to reach the moon from the earth. A scientist named Nicholl challenges them saying they cannot accomplish this feat. He tells them he is going on a trip to the moon to study parts of the moon. The Gun Club decides they will need his wisdom in helping build the gun. They Club and Nicholl team up and build a space shuttle to send them to the moon. They are sent into outer space and get stuck in the moon’s orbit. The men must get out of the orbit to land on the moon, so they turn the rockets on hoping to exit the orbit. However the men are sent flying back to earth and land in the ocean. A ship crew see’s the shuttle crash in the sea and gather a search party to find the men. The search party eventually finds the men but have no new information about the moon.

I am not a fan of science and this book had a lot of science facts in it. I thought the material was dry and hard to get through.

One activity used with this book would to be having students read this book when discussing outer space and the moon. Another activity used with this book would be to have the kids compare and contrast this space shuttle to the space shuttles created by NASA.
  jkauk | Nov 3, 2010 |
This contemporary translation by Edward Roth is more entertaining than the other version of Journey to the Moon I have read and reviewed on LT (which though described as unabridged, was only two thirds of the length of this one). There are still large parts of these stories that are dry and technical and the sense of exuberance and naivety exhibited by the characters is quite hilarious and a bit wearing in the post-space age era. Worth reading as an example of 19th century SF adventure rather than anything else, perhaps. ( )
  john257hopper | Mar 5, 2008 |
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De la terre à la lune : Pendant la guerre fédérale des États-Unis, un nouveau club très influent De la terre à la lune : Pendant la guerre fédérale des États-Unis, un nouveau club très influent s’établit dans la ville de Baltimore, en plein Maryland. On sait avec quelle énergie l’instinct militaire se développa chez ce peuple d’armateurs, de marchands et de mécaniciens.
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Two science fiction tales which relate the adventures of three men who, accompanied by two dogs, are shot to the moon in a specially built shell.

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