HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

An Unfinished Revolution: Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln

by Robin Blackburn (Editor), Karl Marx (Author)

Other authors: Abraham Lincoln (Contributor), Karl Marx (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
571362,926 (3.67)5
Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln exchanged letters at the end of the Civil War. Although they were divided by far more than the Atlantic Ocean, they agreed on the cause of "free labor" and the urgent need to end slavery. In his introduction, Robin Blackburn argues that Lincoln's response signaled the importance of the German American community and the role of the international communists in opposing European recognition of the Confederacy. The ideals of communism, voiced through the International Working Men's Association, attracted many thousands of supporters throughout the US, and helped spread the demand for an eight-hour day. Blackburn shows how the IWA in America - born out of the Civil War - sought to radicalize Lincoln's unfinished revolution and to advance the rights of labor, uniting black and white, men and women, native and foreign-born. The International contributed to a profound critique of the capitalist robber barons who enriched themselves during and after the war, and it inspired an extraordinary series of strikes and class struggles in the postwar decades. In addition to a range of key texts and letters by both Lincoln and Marx, this book includes articles from the radical New York-based journal Woodhull and Claflin's Weekly, an extract from Thomas Fortune's classic work on racism Black and White, Frederick Engels on the progress of US labor in the 1880s, and Lucy Parson's speech at the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Robin Blackburn’s documentary history, “An Unfinished Revolution” is an interesting look at the convergence of Abraham Lincoln and Karl Marx’s views on the United States’ Civil War and its aftermath. Lincoln, the first president elected from the new Republican Party, a party formed with input from Charles Fourier, a French Socialist who worked as Marx’s editor and with many immigrant German members who had been students of Marx, was dedicated to stopping the spread of slavery into any more Federal territories. Marx saw the end of chattel slavery as the first step in freeing all workingmen from capitalist wage slavery. As an economist Marx knew that confining slavery would kill it. Virginia had already made it illegal to import slaves from other states. Like any other commodity if supply exceeded demand the price would drop and the slavocracy’s human capital would be like gold transformed into tin. Marx’s predictions of the possible consequences of “Sessica”, as Marx called the Confederacy, winning and of strategy needed for the Union to win are impressive. Popular opinion was that the Union needed to surround and crush the Confederacy. Marx argued that capturing its center, George, would lead to victory.

Unlike most documentary histories I am familiar with where each document is preceded by a short explanation Blackburn has put all the documents together in the second half of the book and uses a 100 page introduction to present his thesis. Lincoln’s war was only the first half of a struggle that continued in the form of labor unrest in the north after the Confederacy’s defeat on the battlefield. Documents by Thomas Fortune who explains just how wage slavery is worse than when he was property of a slave master and Lucy Parson’s speech at the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World, (IWW), explains that the struggle will not be easy but it must go on, offer much support to Blackburn’s argument and the quote from historian Eric Forner that provides the book with its title, the Civil War and Reconstruction are America’s unfinished revolution.

Overall the book is very readable and thought provoking. It is a scholarly work but the lack of any statistical evidence, I admit statistics are needed but they frequently cause my eyes to glaze over and my mind to wonder, makes it is as accessible as many popular histories. I only have two issues with the book. First, the lack of an index is inexcusable in the computer age. Second, rather than separating the documents according to author and type it seems to me that a chronological arrangement would make it easier for the reader to follow the arguments. ( )
3 vote TLCrawford | Aug 3, 2011 |
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Blackburn, RobinEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Marx, KarlAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Lincoln, AbrahamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Marx, KarlContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln exchanged letters at the end of the Civil War. Although they were divided by far more than the Atlantic Ocean, they agreed on the cause of "free labor" and the urgent need to end slavery. In his introduction, Robin Blackburn argues that Lincoln's response signaled the importance of the German American community and the role of the international communists in opposing European recognition of the Confederacy. The ideals of communism, voiced through the International Working Men's Association, attracted many thousands of supporters throughout the US, and helped spread the demand for an eight-hour day. Blackburn shows how the IWA in America - born out of the Civil War - sought to radicalize Lincoln's unfinished revolution and to advance the rights of labor, uniting black and white, men and women, native and foreign-born. The International contributed to a profound critique of the capitalist robber barons who enriched themselves during and after the war, and it inspired an extraordinary series of strikes and class struggles in the postwar decades. In addition to a range of key texts and letters by both Lincoln and Marx, this book includes articles from the radical New York-based journal Woodhull and Claflin's Weekly, an extract from Thomas Fortune's classic work on racism Black and White, Frederick Engels on the progress of US labor in the 1880s, and Lucy Parson's speech at the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 2
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,617,361 books! | Top bar: Always visible