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Carol by Patricia Highsmith
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Carol (1952)

by Patricia Highsmith

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1,767595,814 (3.82)102
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Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
A swift read. I liked the first half better than the last. In the beginning it wasn't quite so obvious how melodramatic and childish Therese is. Carol was sort of aloof and mysterious. At the end, I gained more respect for Carol and lost all respect for Therese. She seemed very spoiled to me. I get that she is oppressed and in love, but her love wasn't that convincing to me. It was selfish, since she seemed to have no regard for Carol's love for her daughter. So I give it a "like" instead of "really like", I just didn't appreciate Therese's narrative. ( )
  CassandraT | Sep 23, 2018 |
I had really high hopes for this one, as being the lesbian story that so influenced Lolita. But, I don't know. It didn't hold out all the way for me. I understood Teresa's feelings, but not Carol's. The drama didn't hold for me. It was interesting to read a book about something that taboo from that era (1952?), but I didn't really feel Teresa's love. Maybe I wasn't supposed to. I understood her disappointment, with everything that did and didn't happen, and her sex and the lust for youth and apathy. I don't know if I'd suggest it to everyone, but some people would really like it. ( )
  adaorhell | Aug 24, 2018 |
There is a depth of feeling in this writing that is really great. I found it powerful. The story, however, is dragging on in such a way that I feel mired in deep mud. I'm going to abandon this book after reading 40% of it.
  ajlewis2 | Jul 11, 2018 |
Really I would give this like a 3.5 stars... I liked it, but it was very, very much a Lesbian Story from that time period, stylistically, and it reads like a Lesbian Story, and I like Lesbian Stories in part but also Why Do All Lesbians Write Like That. It was still a good, solid read though, once I got past the stylistic thing, and also like boy Iowa as a center of lesbian/bi woman experience, am I right? But it feels good to have another classic queer read under my belt, and I did like the book quite a bit; it was well-paced and the tension was pretty palpable! So if you like Old-Timey Lesbian Stories that are Like That, you'll love this! ( )
  aijmiller | Apr 6, 2018 |
The history of this book as an early lesbian pulp/romance novel is what drew me to it initially. I thoroughly enjoyed this story as part character study, part romance, part coming of age. The vivid writing and the uncertain, itchy rawness of the narrator's perspective had me on edge as I read, just waiting for something utterly shocking to happen. I haven't seen the movie adaptation, but it was certainly lovely to envision Cate Blanchett as Carol.

My only frustration is that in the Kindle version (published by SRS Internet Publishing) there are tons of tedious typos. ( )
  saresmoore | Mar 20, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
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Series (with order)
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Original title
Alternative titles
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People/Characters
Important places
Important events
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Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Edna, Jordy and Jeff
First words
The lunch hour in the co-workers' cafeteria at Frankenberg's had reached its peak.
Quotations
Happiness was like a green vine spreading through her, stretching fine tendrils, bearing flowers through her flesh.
She had seen just now what she had only sensed before, that the whole world was ready to be their enemy, and suddenly what she and Carol had together seemed no longer love or anything happy but a monster between them, with each of them caught in a fist.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Carol was first published in the USA under the title The Price of Salt, 1952, and the author's pseudonym of Claire Morgan.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393325997, Paperback)

Now recognized as a masterwork, the scandalous novel that anticipated Nabokov's Lolita.

"I have long had a theory that Nabokov knew The Price of Salt and modeled the climactic cross-country car chase in Lolita on Therese and Carol's frenzied bid for freedom," writes Terry Castle in The New Republic about this novel, arguably Patricia Highsmith's finest, first published in 1952 under the pseudonym Clare Morgan. Soon to be a new film, The Price of Salt tells the riveting story of Therese Belivet, a stage designer trapped in a department-store day job, whose salvation arrives one day in the form of Carol Aird, an alluring suburban housewife in the throes of a divorce. They fall in love and set out across the United States, pursued by a private investigator who eventually blackmails Carol into a choice between her daughter and her lover. With this reissue, The Price of Salt may finally be recognized as a major twentieth-century American novel.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:19 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

From the Publisher: "I have long had a theory that Nabokov knew The Price of Salt and modeled the climactic cross-country car chase in Lolita on Therese and Carol's frenzied bid for freedom," writes Terry Castle in The New Republic about this novel, arguably Patricia Highsmith's finest, first published in 1952 under the pseudonym Clare Morgan. Soon to be a new film, The Price of Salt tells the riveting story of Therese Belivet, a stage designer trapped in a department-store day job, whose salvation arrives one day in the form of Carol Aird, an alluring suburban housewife in the throes of a divorce. They fall in love and set out across the United States, pursued by a private investigator who eventually blackmails Carol into a choice between her daughter and her lover. With this reissue, The Price of Salt may finally be recognized as a major twentieth-century American novel.… (more)

» see all 12 descriptions

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W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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