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Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in…
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Indian Creek Chronicles: A Winter Alone in the Wilderness

by Pete Fromm

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2791862,916 (4.04)19
The author recounts his 7 months working for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game in an isolated location that changed him from a college kid to a man.
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English (13)  French (4)  Italian (1)  All languages (18)
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
This autobiographical tale is a bit like Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild, except unlike Chris McCandless's case, this author clearly knew up front how much he didn't know. Plus, I would argue that going into this wilderness adventure, the author was nowhere near as solitary a personality as McCandless was. It also makes a difference in reading this that it is in the first-person, while Krakauer was obviously reporting on another person. But imagine if Chris McCandless had survived and later became a gifted writer and told his tale of his adventures. This may be something like that writing. Certainly, there are personality, family, friend, job differences that give a different slant, but I don't think there would be much difference on how a person reacts to living such an isolated life for a long time. It is that reaction that is at the very heart of this book. I encourage anyone wanting to read this book to get a copy that has an Afterword by the author. It does a fine job of explaining, extending, and enhancing the book, giving an otherwise fine book even more resonance. ( )
  larryerick | Apr 26, 2018 |
Gauging by the author's early responses to shooting the head off a grouse
followed by the horrible death of a terrified raccoon in his trap,
there was an expectation that Pete Fromm would somehow teach us how to survive
a Montana "Winter Alone in the Wilderness" without glorifying hunting.

Alas, not only does the book turn out to be a great story for hunters,
with a stomach-wrenching horrendous killing of a mountain lion,
but the author spends very little time alone.

Not only that but Boone, the dog who faithfully accompanied him on this trek,
is simply given away to people Fromm does not know anything about,
nor does he even bother to get their names and address to contact them to learn
anything about the dog's fate.

Mostly he exists in his tent feeling sorry for himself,
telling us little about his daily life with Boone (does he ever train him or just "cuff"?),
and trying to get away from the job
of caring for salmon that he signed on for...so he can get drunker and drunker.

Geez. Very disappointing and misleading. ( )
  m.belljackson | Oct 31, 2017 |
What an adventure! Enjoyed this story of how a young college boy ended up in alone in the Bitterroot Wilderness for 7 months. Will be reading more of Fromm's work - just heard that there is a "sequel" to this book! ( )
  carolfoisset | Nov 19, 2016 |
A very disappointing book. A tale (and seemingly, a tall one), of a young, immature, naïve boy who decides college is too difficult, and on a whim, takes a position with Idaho Fish and Game. His job is to spend a winter alone in the wilderness, protecting a bed of salmon eggs. Never mind that the author has absolutely no experience in anything other than swimming and heavy drinking. He has no clue of how to survive in the wild, other than having read a few “old mountain man” books. Never cut wood, never camped in the cold, never even cooked before. Despite being entrusted by Fish and Game, he manages to break almost every game law in the book with his trusty homemade black powder rifle, including poaching a moose, grouse, squirrels, raccoons, etc. He single-handedly kills a bobcat with a stick, and chases after a wounded bear, armed with only a hatchet. A more foolhardy person would be difficult to find. And, to top it all off, at the end of his “adventure”, he abandons, without a second glance, his dog, the only true friend he had to see him through the winter.
It is said that God watches over and protects fools. Even He must have had his hands full with this character. ( )
  1Randal | Feb 3, 2015 |
A very disappointing book. A tale (and seemingly, a tall one), of a young, immature, naïve boy who decides college is too difficult, and on a whim, takes a position with Idaho Fish and Game. His job is to spend a winter alone in the wilderness, protecting a bed of salmon eggs. Never mind that the author has absolutely no experience in anything other than swimming and heavy drinking. He has no clue of how to survive in the wild, other than having read a few “old mountain man” books. Never cut wood, never camped in the cold, never even cooked before. Despite being entrusted by Fish and Game, he manages to break almost every game law in the book with his trusty homemade black powder rifle, including poaching a moose, grouse, squirrels, raccoons, etc. He single-handedly kills a bobcat with a stick, and chases after a wounded bear, armed with only a hatchet. A more foolhardy person would be difficult to find. And, to top it all off, at the end of his “adventure”, he abandons, without a second glance, his dog, the only true friend he had to see him through the winter.
It is said that God watches over and protects fools. Even He must have had his hands full with this character. ( )
  1Randal | Aug 25, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
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To Ellen for the books, and Big Dan and Paul for trying, and finally to Rader, my connection to the world.
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Once the game wardens left, the little tent we'd set up seemed even smaller.
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This award-winning narrative is a gripping story of adventure, a rousing tale of self-sufficiency, and a modern-day Walden. From either perspective, Fromm lives up to his reputations as one of the West's strongest new voices.

.....So begins Fromm's seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness guarding salmon eggs. After blundering into this forbidding errand as a college lark, Fromm gradually comes face to face with the blunt realities of life as a contemporary mountain man. Brutal cold, isolation, and fearful risks balance against the satisfaction of living a unique existence in modern America.
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