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JavaScript: The Definitive Guide [6th edition]

by David Flanagan

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284171,546 (3.85)6
A revised and updated edition offers comprehensive coverage of ECMAScript 5 (the new JavaScript language standard) and also the new APIs introduced in HTML5, with chapters on functions and classes completely rewritten and updated to match current best practices and a new chapter on language extensions and subsets.… (more)
  1. 30
    JavaScript: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford (timspalding)
    timspalding: JavaScript: The Definitive Gudie is an invaluable reference, but The Good Parts is more necessary. Without it, you'll be writing bad JavaScript forever.
  2. 00
    Learning jQuery: Better Interaction Design and Web Development with Simple JavaScript Techniques by Jonathan Chaffer (nathanm)
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» See also 6 mentions

I was provided access by O'Reilly Publishing to an electronic copy of this book for review purposes.

This is an updated edition to the classic reference book on Javascript to include new information on new standards (such as HTML5 and CSS3), conventions, and frameworks. Although it is possible to learn Javascript from this book, its really meant more as a reference guide and an explanation of how and why Javascript works the way it does. For example, the 1st chapter explains in some detail how Javascript works on the client side and how each of the following chapters will relate to this. The book includes numerous examples of codes to illustrate the concepts and explains the concepts in a clear, easy to follow fashion that doesn't require a degree in astrophysics to understand.

As I said it's not really a book to learn Javascript from, for that I would recommend something like "Head First JavaScript" (also by O'Reilly press.) What I do really like about this book is that it is comprehensive in what is possible with Javascript. While it may not cover the concept in depth, such as the chapter on Jquery, it does give a starting point to the concept. I know it sounds odd, but I really liked the index. It is completely through and easy to find the concept or word that I need to make something work correctly in whatever I'm writing. It's even better with the book because of the hyperlinks that take you right to the section.

My advice? Buy the ebook version, it's much easier to search and to follow to specific links vs. trying to find the stuff in the print edition. Even better, O'Reilly provides multiple formats of the book to suit your needs. Overall, it's a good handy reference to have around to answer questions and introduce new concepts. ( )
  zzshupinga | Aug 23, 2011 |
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A revised and updated edition offers comprehensive coverage of ECMAScript 5 (the new JavaScript language standard) and also the new APIs introduced in HTML5, with chapters on functions and classes completely rewritten and updated to match current best practices and a new chapter on language extensions and subsets.

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