HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and white

by Frank H. Wu

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3041084,970 (3.69)7
Writing in the tradition of W. E. B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and others who confronted the "color line" of the twentieth century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the twenty-first century. Wu examines affirmative action, globalization, immigration, and other controversial contemporary issues through the lens of the Asian-American experience. Mixing personal anecdotes, legal cases, and journalistic reporting, Wu confronts damaging Asian-American stereotypes such as "the model minority" and "the perpetual foreigner." By offering new ways of thinking about race in American society, Wu's work dares us to make good on our great democratic experiment.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Engaging and well written. Enjoyed the non-linear, subject matter grouped approach to the topic. ( )
  AjaxBell | Aug 24, 2017 |
Much too pedantic for my tastes, and much less convincing than I'd hoped (both for my sake and for other Asian-Americans). Wu clearly is invested in his topic, but often constructs his arguments with overstuffed or just awkward sentences that end up obscuring his points instead of supporting them. Other times he makes sweeping generalizations and even once refers to himself in stereotypical terms (despite denying that such stereotypes have validity). I was even appalled by his epilogue, in which he extols a small college for balancing universality and individuality -- a college whose enrollment consists of 26 MEN -- but doesn't really support his claims with any real details about how they manage to stay individuals.

It may have been silly of me to expect that any one book could've taken on the whole gamut of race relations for all the different Asian American communities. But that is what this book promises, and fails to deliver. I did learn some things, but I feel like I would've learned more from a memoir in which Wu describes his own specific experiences and relations with race, rather than a work more given to principles and vague pronouncements about the importance of coalitions and community. ( )
  simchaboston | Nov 9, 2014 |
Professor Wu clearly dissects the reasons why the "model minority" label does more damage than good for Asians and Asian Americans. ( )
  kchung_kaching | Sep 1, 2014 |
Frank H. Wu's Yellow is an excellent analysis of the absence of an Asian perspective in America's racial debate and what it's like to be an Asian-American as a result. Throughout the book, I found myself thinking "That's happened to me!" with an alarming frequency. Yellow also has the added benefit of explaining the dense analysis of a related subject in Edward W. Said's Orientalism in a way that is concise and easily understood. ( )
  JillianAmelia | Apr 11, 2011 |
A good introduction to Asian America. I will say however, that Frank H. Wu's background is in law, which definitely shows throughout the book. A particularly long list of stereotyped caricatures of Asians in media sticks out in my mind, though I do remember thinking simultaneously that his list was 'way too long' but also 'really interesting.' He seems to have a gift at moving you along and getting you through to the end. A bit dense to read at times (from what I recall as an undermotivated undergrad), but definitely recommended reading for anyone interested in learning more about the Asian American experience. ( )
  h.kim | Feb 6, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
For my wife, Carol L. Izumi
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Writing in the tradition of W. E. B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and others who confronted the "color line" of the twentieth century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the twenty-first century. Wu examines affirmative action, globalization, immigration, and other controversial contemporary issues through the lens of the Asian-American experience. Mixing personal anecdotes, legal cases, and journalistic reporting, Wu confronts damaging Asian-American stereotypes such as "the model minority" and "the perpetual foreigner." By offering new ways of thinking about race in American society, Wu's work dares us to make good on our great democratic experiment.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.69)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 5
3.5 1
4 14
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 201,866,389 books! | Top bar: Always visible