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Black Coffee [novel] by Agatha Christie
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Black Coffee [novel] (1934)

by Agatha Christie, Charles Osborne (Adapter)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Hercule Poirot Mystery (7)

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1,243389,963 (3.29)69
A novel based on a 1930s play in which detective Hercule Poirot investigates the murder of a British scientist and the theft of his formula for an atomic explosive. Suspects range from his son, heavily in debt, to an Italian lady spy.

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» See also 69 mentions

English (34)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  Danish (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
This is my first Christie experience -- and I enjoyed it. I'd pick up another. ( )
  SMBrick | Feb 25, 2018 |
Black Coffee was originally a 1930s play by Agatha Christie but this is a novelized version by Charles Osborne which was published in 1998. Although most of the writing is Christie's’, this new author has left his stamp on the book as well. Hercule Poirot, the Belgium detective, comes across quite British in this version and the usually placid Hastings calls Poirot out as an “arrogant snob” - words I do not believe that Ms. Christie would have allowed her character to utter.

This story involves the poisoning of a prominent scientist at his country manor attended by the usual assortment of characters who all had a reason to want the man dead. By the process of elimination and close observation, Poirot points out the correct murderer to the police and is able to help a young couple put their suspicions of each other behind them.

Although this is certainly not one of my favorite Poirot stories, I did find the book a light, enjoyable read. ( )
  DeltaQueen50 | Jan 4, 2018 |
Rating: 4 Stars

This book is amazing! I know that it is technically not written by Agatha Christie herself but Mr. Osborne does an amazing job capturing the original Hercule Poirot we Christie fan have come to love. The story was well written and flowed very well. If I didn't know better, I'd say Ms. Christie wrote this herself. It is so nice to know that authors were so inspired by her work that they continue to write in her name and carry on her beloved characters! ( )
  ne.may97 | Jan 1, 2018 |
Originally written as a play by Christie, Charles Osborne has adapted it into a novel.

This was a fast read and an enjoyable read. Close to Christie in style but not 100%, but then that is fine with me.

Physicist Sir Claud Amory has sent for Hercule Poirot to come and find who it is who wants to steal a valuable formula. Amory feels it is a family member who is living at the estate. Before Poirot can arrive, Sir Claud is dead...of poison.

Poirot is left to discern not only the thief but also the murderer. Being that Sir Claud was not well liked by almost everyone, there is a good list of suspects. Sir Claud's sister, son, daughter-in-law, niece, secretary, unexpected guest and even the butler are under Poirot's surveillance.
Each character has their reason for not being fond of Sir Claud, and each has to be eliminated.

Hastings, Poirot's old friend and partner in detecting, is along and so is Inspector Japp of Scotland Yard. Their appearance gives the book the feeling of Christie's older works.

A cozy and quick read. ( )
  ChazziFrazz | Dec 27, 2017 |
Disappointingly by the numbers with thin characterizations and not a particularly compelling mystery. I guess it was just an adaptation and lacks Christies flair. ( )
  judtheobscure | Oct 6, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christie, Agathaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Osborne, CharlesAdaptermain authorall editionsconfirmed
Moffatt, JohnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Hercule Poirot sat at breakfast in his small but agreeably cosy flat in Whitehall Mansions.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Black Coffee was originally a play by Agatha Christie published in 1934 by A. Ashley and son. It was adapted as a novel by Charles Osborne, published 1998 by St. Martin Press. Please do not merge the two records.
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Black Coffee is an adaptation of an Agatha Christie play. It was written into novel form posthumously by Charles Osborne.

In the book, Sir Claud Amory, who has been working on an important scientific formula, suspects that one of his family members is trying to steal his formula. Poirot is called in to discover the suspected thief and instead finds himself investigating not only a theft but a murder...
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