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The Little Paris Bookshop (2013)

by Nina George

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,7801843,804 (3.47)165
""There are books that are suitable for a million people, others for only a hundred. There are even remedies--I mean books--that were written for one person only...A book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that's how I sell books." Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can't seem to heal through literature is himself; he's still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened. After Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, he hauls anchor and departs on a mission to the south of France, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story. Joined by a bestselling but blocked author and a lovelorn Italian chef, Perdu travels along the country's rivers, dispensing his wisdom and his books, showing that the literary world can take the human soul on a journey to heal itself. Internationally bestselling and filled with warmth and adventure, The Little Paris Bookshop is a love letter to books, meant for anyone who believes in the power of stories to shape people's lives"--… (more)
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» See also 165 mentions

English (175)  German (4)  Dutch (3)  Piratical (1)  Swedish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (185)
Showing 1-5 of 175 (next | show all)
Fell for this one hook, line, and sinker. Charming, charming, charming! ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
The reader is required to be patient and to sink themselves in the locale of The Little Paris Bookshop. One must also lay down judgement and take in the many descriptions from the detailed characters. This is not a surface book or a story that would dwell in the same microwave world that many are accustomed to today. I could see these sunsets, feel the salt air, taste the delicious meals as I read. Many catch phrases and recipes worth noting. I'd count myself fortunate to have a friendship with this Soul Reader as we traveled on a barge with special books along with cats, authors and wine...to float to "live". ( )
  BONS | Mar 25, 2021 |
Not my cup of tea. In fact, the droning on and on about mourning love and wasting 20 years mourning lost love was more that I could take. Skimmed the last 70 pages and even that was a chore. I did like the idea of a boat made into a bookstore and the cats. ( )
  3CatMom | Dec 28, 2020 |
Well, I finished today a book that I bought in January; I wanted to read right away because I heard so many good things about it and the blurbs said that it is a fantastic book.
I loved the descriptions; I felt that I was traveling with Jean Perdu and Max Jordan to places that maybe I'll visit, and maybe I won't. There were parts that the pacing was slow, or I wanted to slap the main character snap 0ut of it, but when I finished the book, I understood why the pacing was slow and the main character as he did.
For some reason, all the characters had lost something, and through their journey, they found a new way that makes them understand what they had, what they lost, and that they have to continue to live their life to the fullest.
There are so many quotes in this book that I take with me from this book; for sure, I will reread the book to write down every quote that inspired me. I am looking forward to reading Nina George's other translated books. ( )
  AvigailRGRIL | Nov 9, 2020 |
4.5. Several blurbs on the back of this book describe it as "enchanting" so I'm going with that. For anyone who loves books, just for what they are, the feel, the smell, the heft, the possibilities they hold within, you will feel understood by this novel. Jean Perdu (lost, if your high school French is failing you) is a literary apothecary. "a book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that's how I sell books." (28) What a job description! That's also the eponymous name of his book barge, moored in the Seine in Paris. Jean has a special talent for knowing just what books people need to read to heal. Unfortunately he can't (or won't) apply this to himself and his broken heart. For 20 years he has pined after Manon, his lover for 5 years until she left him abruptly with a letter that he has never opened. He has even blocked off the room in his apartment where they spent the most time together. Talk about building walls.....when a new tenant (Catherine) comes to the building with nothing after her cruel divorce, the landlady asks Jean for any spare furniture he could contribute. With some guilt, but more irritation, he takes the table from the walled off room to this woman, along with some books to heal her. He finds her attractive and his dormant heart begins to stir. He also finds Manon's unopened letter in a drawer in the table and realizes it is time to face the past. When he reads it, it is not at all what he expected and he is compelled to action. He unmoors his book barge and sets sail for the south of France (Avignon), Manon's hometown and family (including husband). Along for the journey are 2 cats, Kafka and Lindgren, and at the last moment, Max Jordan jumps aboard. He is the "it" writer of the moment, a young, handsome success: "the new voice of rebellious youth." He and Jean know each other from the apartment building and also the book barge, but Max is dodging his new-found fame and also grappling with writer's block. Like any river story, the journey is one of growth and movement and understanding. There are mishaps and adventures along the way, including the town where they tango, stir up a local mob and befriend Salvador Cuneo, a Neopolitan jack-of-all-trades, though especially skilled at cooking. He too is running from/to something, searching for a lost love he met on the river years ago. The trio continues south, warming with the climate and the season and melting their resistance to the road blocks they have set up in their own lives. There are elements of magical realism, as well as deep thoughts about life and love. Manon is present through journal excerpts interspersed with the story, that only the reader has access to intially, and Catherine is present in Jean's thoughts and the myriad post cards he sends her as he travels. Everything resolves nicely in Avignon (Bonnieux and Sanary-Sur-Mer, to be specific) though unexpectedly, so worth it to keep reading to the very end. Suffice it to say, all 3 men find what they are looking for, though not in the way they originally thought. It is a beautiful story of landscapes both exterior, through the French countryside and interior, through the cycle of loss and love. A little "heavy" at times in analysis, but overall rich and worthwhile. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 175 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nina Georgeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bering, EmmaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campbell, CassandraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Junker Miranda, UlrikaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pare, SimonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
Ich widme diesen Roman meinem Vater
Joachim Albert Wolfgang George, genannt Jo der Breite.
Sawalde/Eichwaldau 20. März 1938-4. April 2011, Hameln.

Papa, mit dir ist der einzige Mensch gestorben, der alles gelesen hat, was ich je schrieb, seit ich schreiben konnte. Du wirst mir fehlen, immer.
Ich sehe dich in jedem Licht des Abends und in jeder Welle aller Meere. Du gingst mitten im Wort.

Nina George, im Januar 2013
Den Verlorenen gewidmet. Und jenen, die sie immer noch lieben.
I dedicate this novel to my father,
JOACHIM ALBERT GEORGE,
known as Broad Jo.
March 20, 1938 (Sawade/Eichwaldau)—
April 4, 2011 (Hamelin)

Papa,
you were the only person who read everything I ever
wrote from the moment I learned to write. I will miss
you at all times.  I see you in every ray of evening
light and in every wave of every sea.
You left in mid sentence.

Nina George,
January 2013
Dedicated to the departed.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
And to those who go on loving them.
First words
Wie konnte es nur passieren, dass ich mich dazu überreden liess?
How on earth could I have let them talk me into it?
Quotations
Memories are like wolves. You can't lock them away and hope they leave you alone.
"What is wrong with old? Age isn't a disease. We all grow old, even books. But are you, is anyone, worth less, or less important, because they've been around for longer?"
"Books keep stupidity at bay. And vain hopes. And vain men. They undress you with love, strength and knowledge. It's love from within. Make your choice: book or …"
You only really get to know your husband when he walks out on you.
"As long as she doesn't turn out too smart for men."
"For the stupid ones, she will, Madame. But who wants them anyway? A stupid man is every woman's downfall."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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Wikipedia in English (1)

""There are books that are suitable for a million people, others for only a hundred. There are even remedies--I mean books--that were written for one person only...A book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that's how I sell books." Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can't seem to heal through literature is himself; he's still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened. After Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, he hauls anchor and departs on a mission to the south of France, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story. Joined by a bestselling but blocked author and a lovelorn Italian chef, Perdu travels along the country's rivers, dispensing his wisdom and his books, showing that the literary world can take the human soul on a journey to heal itself. Internationally bestselling and filled with warmth and adventure, The Little Paris Bookshop is a love letter to books, meant for anyone who believes in the power of stories to shape people's lives"--

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