HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Backyard Ballistics by William Gurstelle
Loading...

Backyard Ballistics (2001)

by William Gurstelle

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
623723,561 (3.96)6

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I bought this book to use in an after school science enrichment class I teach. It did not disappoint, the kids thought all my exploding stuff was great. Along the way they also learned terms like exothermic and velocity. Pretty decent for elementary school. Plus? Now I'm the coolest mom in school. :-D ( )
  cookierooks | Nov 16, 2016 |
A manual that shows how to make fun shooting and flammable things such as a potato cannon, a paper match rocket and a Cincinnati fire kite. Far beyond the ballistic fun to be had are the opportunities to explore physics through the scientific method. The author explains the science behind each project and provides further thought for study. Includes sidebar stories about relevant scientists and emphasis on safety.
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
This book rules. I am a grown-ass woman and I'll be doing some of these experiments. I don't have kids. It just sounds like fun. ( )
  psychedelicmicrobus | Mar 7, 2013 |
This book is not politically correct, in an era in which school science experiments have been tamed to the point that there is little possibility that the teacher will kill or maim him/herself. William Gurstelle, an engineer who has been collecting plans for devices that will throw stuff fast and far, is careful to emphasize the hazards implicit in shooting potatoes or water balloons the length of a football field, or launching flaming newspaper (Cincinnati fire kite) into the sky. Youngsters would need lots of adult supervision when making or using these devices, but any budding engineer would thrill to see them in action. ( )
  hcubic | Jan 27, 2013 |
Take a risk and have some fun. This book give details on how to make some fun and slightly dangerous projects safely. I remember making a few of these as a kid. ( )
  Indy_115 | Jul 27, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to my father, Harold H. Gurstelle.
First words
When you were a child, people told you not to play with matches for a good reason---they can be dangerous!
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

This step-by-step guide enables ordinary folks to construct 13 awesome ballistic devices using inexpensive household or hardware store materials. Clear instructions, diagrams, and photographs show how to build projects ranging from the simple, a match-powered rocket, to the more complex, a tabletop catapult, to the classic, the infamous potato cannon, to the offbeat, a Cincinnati fire kite. With a strong emphasis on safety, Backyard Ballistics also provides troubleshooting tips, explains the physics behind each project, and profiles such scientists and extraordinary experimenters as Alfred Nobel, Robert Goddard, and Isaac Newton, among others. This book will be indispensable for the legions of backyard toy-rocket launchers and fireworks fanatics who wish every day were the Fourth of July.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 8
3.5 2
4 19
4.5 2
5 13

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,695,867 books! | Top bar: Always visible