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Dark Matter: Star Carrier: Book Five by Ian…
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Dark Matter: Star Carrier: Book Five

by Ian Douglas

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I have to say that I was rather disappointed with this book. The star rating I have given it is just barely and I was tempted to give it an even lower one but the writing itself is good enough so I stuck to the one I have given it.

Previous books have impressed me with their detailed space combat and good solid science. Fictional science of course but solid within that context. This book is still rather hard core when it comes to science but most of the book is simply spent either discussing science, social engineering or politics. Actually the first two-thirds of the book is very disappointing and borders on being boring with all the discussions, info-dumps and political rubbish. I really like when the science or situation is properly explained but this book is taking it too far.

Also, I really dislike the part of the story were, instead of actually fighting the aliens, the humans fight among themselves. I am both a EC-citizen as well as working in Geneva and I really have nothing kind to say about the EC political dimwits nor a lot of the wasters of oxygen sitting in Geneva but this book is taking said dimwits so far into the realm of frustrating stupidity that it is simply not enjoyable reading.

The enjoyment of this book lies almost entirely in the last third of the book where we actually get some proper action in space. The actual plot finally get moving somewhat and in the last couple of pages we, at least, get a resolution of one of the political issues that bugged me tremendously throughout most of the book.

There are indeed hopes that future books will be more enjoyable due to the ending of this one but it was quite frustrating to slug through the first two-thirds of the book to arrive at this ending. I hope that the next book truly picks up the good parts and preferably focuses on the extraterrestrial issues rather than more political nonsense on Earth itself.
( )
  perjonsson | Oct 28, 2017 |
Dark Matter, Star Carrier, Book 5
The Star Carrier series is one of the best examples of space opera, military fiction on the market. Each book in the series can be treated as a standalone story or part of the larger whole with equal satisfaction. Book 5 covers events from January 2425-March 2425. Where the prior stories in this series were mostly military science fiction with the politics and scientific explanations taking a secondary role,this story turns that formula on its head. The politics, philosophies are front and center with the descriptions of the battles and their tactics take a suffering for it. There are long passages dicussing political theory, quantum physics,and cosmology. For readers looking for traditional military science fiction this is book’s major weakness.
One of central conflicts of the story is the political and military struggle between the United States of North America and the European Confederation. The key question is, do you concede to the demands of aliens asking you to give up certain types of technology or do you continue to battle on when victory is a possibility but not a certainty? The readers of and actors in this book are faced with this intellectual dilemma. Another question that is raised is: What are you willing to do in order for your side win? The answer to this question is played out in space where one side chooses a dubious ally with negative consequences, and on earth where one side secretly uses an AI to create a religion to undermine a nation’s will to fight. Last but least what is the role of religion in a modern scientific society? Science fiction is often used to get the reader to contemplate larger issues in society. On that level I found the the story compelling. ( )
  Cataloger623 | Nov 8, 2014 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062183990, Mass Market Paperback)

An enemy might just have to become an ally . . . in order to save humankind

The United States of North America is now engaged in a civil war with the Earth Confederation, which wants to yield to the demands of the alien Sh'daar, limit human technology, and become a part of the Sh'daar Galactic Collective. USNA President Koenig believes that surrendering to the Sh'daar will ultimately doom humankind.

But when highly advanced, seemingly godlike aliens appear through an artificial wormhole in the Omega Centauri Cluster 16,000 light years from Earth, President Koenig is faced with a tremendous choice: continue fighting the Sh'daar . . . or ally with them against the newcomers in a final war that will settle the fate of more than one universe.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:23 -0400)

The United States of North America is now engaged in a civil war with the Earth Confederation, which wants to yield to the demands of the alien Sh'daar, limit human technology, and become a part of the Sh'daar Galactic Collective. USNA President Koenig believes that surrendering to the Sh'daar will ultimately doom humankind. But when highly advanced, seemingly godlike aliens appear through an artificial wormhole in the Omega Centauri Cluster 16,000 light years from Earth, President Koenig is faced with a tremendous choice.… (more)

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