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Anne Frank by Josephine Poole
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Anne Frank

by Josephine Poole

Other authors: Angela Barrett (Illustrator)

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Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
This book tells the well-known story of Anne Frank beginning with her childhood before the war and leading up to her being taken into the concentration camps. What sets this book apart from all the other books written about Anne Frank are the beautiful illustrations. The colors start off bright and colorful signaling happiness but turn slightly darker as the story progresses. The content of the book match the illustrations perfectly page by page.

This book could be used when teaching a WWll unit, or the beginning of introducing students to a writing journal/diary. Without Anne keeping a journal, the world wouldn't know her story as we do today. ( )
  JessicaGarcia6 | Apr 21, 2017 |
Anne Frank, as told by Josephine Poole and illustrated by Angela Barrett, offers a poignant, touchingly rendered portrayal of Anne Frank's young life. Barrett's illustrations are intricately detailed and soft, highlighting the lightness of childhood in a way that is often overlooked when considering Anne Frank. Barrett's images also have a delicate, feminine quality about them as well, and many of the images have undertones of pinks and mauves. The illustrations become darker and more muted as the story progresses and Anne's own life becomes darker as well. I feel as though Barrett uses light as a symbol not only of happiness and innocence, but also as Anne's own spirit. Images of her early childhood are particularly colorful and bright, contrasted with the darker pictures of Nazis and Anne in hiding. However, even in the darkest moments, when Anne is hiding in the attic with Peter or being escorted out of hiding by Nazi officials, she herself is light. Also, the final illustration, which shows Miep Gies handing Otto Frank his daughter's diary after the war, Mr. Frank's dark figure is contrasted by the light green of leaves in the window, sunlight streaming in on the sill. I almost see this picture as the hope and vitality of Anne's spirit in the diary, and of her legacy changing lives long after her death.

Josephine Poole's accompanying text complements the illustrations, sharing Anne's story with young readers in such a way as not to compromise the severity of her loss while maintaining an age-appropriate story for young readers. Instead of emphasizing the horrors of the Holocaust, Poole uses Anne's acute emotions to share the experience with children, such as Anne's ostracism in school and her final goodbye with her cat. Poole and Barrett present the joy and sadness in Anne's life, the struggle and persecution of the Jews, but also the happiness of childhood and friendship, even in dark times. ( )
  sgudan | Apr 12, 2017 |
Illustrations: colored pencil. This book is about a little girl named Anne Frank and her family. Anne Frank writes in her diary during World War 2 because she is a Jew and needs to hide from the Nazis. Her dad creates a secret hideout for her and her family in an annex above his work space. They manage to hide from the Nazis for some time, but eventually they get caught and sent to concentration camps. Her father is the only one out of their family to survive and a family friend collected the journal she had been writing in to share Anne Frank's story with the world. This book is a biography because it is real-life story about Anne Frank described by someone else. It describes the person’s surroundings and it provides examples that demonstrate the person’s behavior. Age appropriateness: middle and high school. ( )
  allieburks | Apr 6, 2017 |
Anne Frank grew up in Germany with her sister and her parents. Her family were German-Jews that had money, but Germany was very poor. Germany used to be one of the greatest nations in the world, but now 10 years after the First World War, the country was very poor, with people having no jobs and no money. Adolf Hitler was the ruler and blamed the Jews. He hated the Jews and began singling them out. The Jews were constantly harassed and if they stood up for themselves, they were sent away. Many Jews left Germany. Anne Frank's family moved to the Netherlands, but they could not escape the horribleness Hitler's army was creating. All Jews over the age of six had to were a yellow star on their clothes. They were banned from public places. The Frank's could not move back to Germany. Mr. Frank built a secret room in the empty rooms of his office for them to hide from the Germans. They stayed in the secret space more than 2 years with visits from her father's secretary to deliver news and food. During this time, Anne Frank kept a diary that would later be famous. On August 4, 1944, they were found and taken away. Mr. Frank's secretary found Anne's diary and gave it to Mr. Frank. He was the only one that survived, the family got separated. His wife and daughters died of typhus in a concentration camp in Germany. The only thing that Mr. Frank had left was the diary of his daughter, Anne. ( )
  CKISSINGER | Jan 25, 2017 |
"Anne Frank" tells the story of Anne Frank going through World War II alongside illustrations very dark in colors and nature. This story includes how Anne's life was before the war, life during the war, the ruling of Hitler, and the hardships she and her family dealt with during this time. Her father was the sole survivor of his family and the ending of this picture book shows foreshadowing about how Anne's diary could affect the world. The book also includes dark and sad imagery that helps portray the reality and emotions that a lot of Jewish people faced during this time. Overall, this story and the illustrations helped paint a picture of these people's reality. I would read this to older students studying the Holocaust because of how important it is to understand the harsh reality that is this part of history and the importance of Anne Frank's impact on the world. ( )
  goreyes | Oct 29, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Josephine Pooleprimary authorall editionscalculated
Barrett, AngelaIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375832424, Hardcover)

The life of Anne Frank, from birth until being taken from the hidden attic by the Nazis, is presented in this haunting, meticulously researched picture book. It is a compelling yet easy-to-understand "first" introduction to the Holocaust as witnessed by Anne and her family. The stunningly evocative illustrations by Angela Barrett are worth a thousand words in capturing for young Americans what it must have felt like to be Anne Frank, a spirited child caught in the maelstrom of World War II atrocities. A detailed timeline of important events in Europe and in the Frank family is included.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:03 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

The life of Anne Frank, from birth until being taken from the hidden attic by the Nazis, is presented in this haunting, meticulously researched picture book. It is a compelling yet easy-to-understand "first" introduction to the Holocaust as witnessed by Anne and her family. The stunningly evocative illustrations by Angela Barrett are worth a thousand words in capturing for young Americans what it must have felt like to be Anne Frank, a spirited child caught in the maelstrom of World War II atrocities. A detailed timeline of important events in Europe and in the Frank family is included.… (more)

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