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This Savage Song

by V. E. Schwab

Series: Monsters of Verity (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,564918,934 (4.07)21
#1 New York Times Bestseller * An Amazon Best Book of the Year There's no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from acclaimed author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains--and friends or enemies--with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books, This Savage Song is a must-have for fans of Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, and Laini Taylor. Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city--a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent--but he's one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who's just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August's secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives. In This Savage Song, Victoria Schwab creates a gritty, seething metropolis, one worthy of being compared to Gotham and to the four versions of London in her critically acclaimed fantasy for adults, A Darker Shade of Magic. Her heroes will face monsters intent on destroying them from every side--including the monsters within.… (more)
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    The Catalyst by Helena Coggan (passion4reading)
    passion4reading: Urban fantasy that explores the difference between monsters born and monsters made.
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Showing 1-5 of 91 (next | show all)
Quite dark, but really good. Interesting commentary on monsters and humans and who is truly capable of evil. Looking forward to the next one. ( )
  KimZoot | Jan 2, 2022 |
Interesting concept and world. I like that it's dark and didn't devolve into insta-romance (or any romance, for that matter). I'm not sure about the whole sinful souls thing: by which/whose standards are actions deemed crimes, that they would turn a soul red? Why the hell is the self-defense action of one of the main characters at the end a sin? Not on board with that. ( )
  hissingpotatoes | Dec 28, 2021 |
This was yet again another brilliant book by V.E Schwab, who is fast becoming one of my favourite authors. The world Schwab has written is like our own but she has seamlessly weaved in the existence of monsters - dark creatures that are created by acts of violence. One of our main characters, August, is a monster himself and he just wants to have a normal human existence - someone that anyone who has ever felt different can easily relate to. Our other main character Kate lives on the other side of the divided city and is doing everything she can to prove herself to her father. Our characters meet and pretty soon the adventure starts.

One of the things I really enjoyed was how quickly the main chunk of the story began. We weren't left with chapters upon chapters of build up. Instead the characters met quickly and from that the action kicked in and ran with it. The pace of the book fit the story and I sped through the novel because I just had to know what was going to happen next. The other thing I loved about this story was that there was absolutely no romance between our two main characters. This is something that is often sorely lacking in fiction and it was refreshing that their relationship focused on the development of their friendship. Within their budding friendship, Schwab showed how two people who are completely different can develop such a strong friendship and level of trust between each other. This is something that is vitally important in our modern world.

Overall I loved this book and would highly recommend it to everyone. Thank you to Titan for sending me the book and giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book. ( )
  sianhopper | Dec 6, 2021 |
Rating: 5/5
Title: This Savage Song
Author: Victoria Schwab

Synopsis:
There’s no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from acclaimed author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains—and friends or enemies—with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books, This Savage Song is a must-have for fans of Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, and Laini Taylor.
Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives. In This Savage Song, Victoria Schwab creates a gritty, seething metropolis, one worthy of being compared to Gotham and to the four versions of London in her critically acclaimed fantasy for adults, A Darker Shade of Magic. Her heroes will face monsters intent on destroying them from every side—including the monsters within.

Initial thoughts:
I’ve always been taught never to judge a book by it’s cover, but I gotta say, the cover of this one really had me interested. On the back cover there is a short little poem that explained what the different monsters of Verity were and I thought that it was quite clever. This book had been on my TBR list for a while now as well simply due to the fact that it was written by Victoria Schwab. There is a second book as well that I ordered with the first and have yet to read, but will do so as soon as I finish writing this review. Also, from what I had gathered before reading the book, it seemed like this was going to be a ‘what makes a monster’ book and Victoria did not disappoint me at all with this wonderful tale.

Plot:
What I liked:
The way that Victoria Schwab writes madness is captivating. As soon as a character begins to feel stressed, the writing style of the book changes to match the thoughts of that person. It feels so relatable. Things move quickly, but never too quickly for the reader to be lost in the stylistic change each time it happens.
I also really loved the world building and the characters in this book. Kate is wild, but always seems to have an end goal in mind while August is rather frazzled at times trying to understand humans and conform to their mannerisms so as not to be out of place. The change in tone that comes when each character is in the spotlight holds a lot of feeling and makes things very distinct as they both describe their understanding of their surroundings and give the reader a specific look at Verity.
The villains in the book were executed fantastically. The idea of what is a real monster really plays a role as August and Kate both learn who is really pulling the strings within the city.
The pace of the book was wonderful and I thought it was really cool to keep track of the days along with August as a new tally formed on his skin each day.

What I didn't like:
To be honest there wasn’t a lot that I found I disliked about this book. I really enjoyed the story and didn’t have a qualm with any of the characters that were written.

Characters:
Kate Harker: She is an amazingly strong character and personality. She does have her flaws though and that’s what makes her human and relatable.
August Flynn: My favorite character in the book. He was so loveable even though he was a Sunai and could eat people’s souls. I loved how his mind jumped around like notes on a music score. He just didn’t want to hurt anyone and be considered ‘normal’ and I wanted to give him a hug.
Ilsa Flynn: She is a little scattered, but I loved her. She seemed very graceful and seemed rather innocent, but she could also be very deadly.
Leo Flynn: A Sunai with a very righteous way of thinking. He believes that humans deserve to be judged and punished for their crimes.
Sloan: A Malchai who was made from Callum Harker. He is certainly a very manipulative character, but has his own sense of what needs to happen in order for change to occur.
Callum Harker: I hated his guts. He was a very well thought out villainous character who only protected those who could pay for it. He didn’t seem to care about anyone and even when he showed a sliver of humanity, I couldn’t find myself to trust him.
Henry Flynn: He was an interesting father figure who only wanted to protect.

Overall:
I would recommend this book to just about anyone. The theme of the book was amazing and so was the process in which it was conveyed. Violence breed more violence, literally. I know that I will read this book over and over again as time goes on and I cannot wait to finish reading the second book in the series. ( )
  klcarmack | Nov 12, 2021 |
Deplorable human acts create monsters. The worse the act (ie, mass murder), the worse kind of monster is created. How does the world devolve when this happens? Perhaps you learn to control the monsters for your own deplorable reasons. Two heroes arise, one, ironically, the worst kind of monster to fight the human monsters & the real monsters. Infinitely readable. 5 ⭐️ Unfortunately book 2 is sold out & going in a second printing now.

Also, an excellent title! ( )
  KarenMonsen | Oct 16, 2021 |
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Epigraph
Plenty of humans are monstrous, and plenty of monsters know how to play at being human.
V. A. Vale
Dedication
To the strange, and the mad, and the monstrous
First words
The night Kate Harker decided to burn down the school chapel, she wasn't angry or drunk.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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#1 New York Times Bestseller * An Amazon Best Book of the Year There's no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from acclaimed author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains--and friends or enemies--with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books, This Savage Song is a must-have for fans of Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, and Laini Taylor. Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city--a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent--but he's one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who's just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August's secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives. In This Savage Song, Victoria Schwab creates a gritty, seething metropolis, one worthy of being compared to Gotham and to the four versions of London in her critically acclaimed fantasy for adults, A Darker Shade of Magic. Her heroes will face monsters intent on destroying them from every side--including the monsters within.

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Book description
Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives.
Haiku summary
Urban fantasy
explores the difference between
monsters born and made.
(passion4reading)

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