HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

by Philip K. Dick

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,976652,496 (3.9)79
On Mars, the harsh climate could make any colonist turn to drugs to escape a dead-end existence. Especially when the drug is Can-D, which transports its users into the idyllic world of a Barbie-esque character named Perky Pat. When the mysterious Palmer Eldritch arrives with a new drug called Chew-Z, he offers a more addictive experience, one that might bring the user closer to God. But in a world where everyone is tripping, no promises can be taken at face value. This Nebula Award nominee is one of Philip K. Dick's enduring classics, at once a deep character study, a dark mystery, and a tightrope walk along the edge of reality and illusion.… (more)
  1. 21
    Neuromancer by William Gibson (cammykitty)
    cammykitty: The Three Stigmata to me is a forefather of cyberpunk, with it's internal action that questions existence and God. Neuromancer is often credited as the book that made the genre, so I suggest Neuromancer as an interesting book to compare to The Three Stigmata.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 79 mentions

English (60)  Spanish (1)  Finnish (1)  Italian (1)  French (1)  All languages (64)
Showing 1-5 of 60 (next | show all)
The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch by Philip K Dick transports us to a life on Mars almost as terrible as remaining here. Read my review.

https://www.johncadamsreviews.com/single-post/the-three-stigmata-of-palmer-eldri...

#PhilipKDick #ThreeStigmata #ScienceFiction #JohnCAdamsReviews #JohnCAdams #WayBackWhensday #book #books #bookreview #bookreviews ( )
  johncadamssf | Jun 26, 2022 |
The Barbie Doll of Sci-Fi

Who knows if Philip K. Dick ever heard of Barbie (the doll premiered at the 1959 American International Toy Fair in New York City), but Perky Pat and Walt certainly do bring the long-lived fashion toy and her consort Ken to mind. In PKD’s imaginative version of a toy, Perky Pat and her products become the focus of a drug-induced simulacrum affording dispirited colonists throughout the solar system relief from their dreary lives. Can-D is the drug smuggled onto the colonies by the company that markets Perky Pat Layouts and which holds a monopoly on this sort of escapism. That is until Palmer Eldritch appears and sells a rival and more deep acting drug, one that doesn’t require a layout, that is more free form, called Chew-Z. It’s through this vehicle that PKD has his protagonist, precog Barney Mayerson, explore the meaning of religious experience and the existence of a god, while he uses it to correct the mistakes he’s made in his life, primarily his cynical divorce from his wife Emily in pursuit of success in the Perky Pat Layout company.

All this unfolds in a typically dystopian Dick world. Earth has become almost too hot for human life. People cannot walk safely outside, and when they do they must wear special thermal gear. In this future, Antarctica has transformed into a temperate locale and vacation spot for the wealthy. People live in apartments ranked ordered to show status, numbered from one to the thousands starting in New York. Typical of Dick, some people, known as precogs, such as Barney, possess the ability to see into the future. Earth has colonized the entire solar system, conscripts people to populate them, because life in the colonies is hard, isolated, and grubby. One world government, the U.N., presides over all, but leaders are mercenary and it’s the rich who really wield the power with influence and money. As for religion, these tend to be more cultish, such as the Neo-Christianity of the Anne Hawthorne, who helps Barney while in the throes of Chew-Z. And Earth has made contact with civilizations beyond, here Proxima.

The storyline is fairly straightforward, but the conclusion, in PKD fashion, is ambiguous. Leo Bulero founded and runs Perky Pat Layouts. Barney serves as his chief precog, reviewing and picking out all of Pat’s accessories with an eye to maximizing popularity and profits. Bulero also operates an illegal drug business located on Venus, where it manufactures a chewable hallucinate called Can-D and smuggles it to the colonies. The drug, consumed by groups of people in the presence of a Perky Pat layout, allows them to escape to a world reminiscent of an older Earth. To enhance the experience, they buy all manner of items, from cars to tableware, to create realistic layouts, these the source, along with Can-D, of Bulero’s prosperity.

Palmer Eldritch throws Bulero’s and Mayerson’s world into disarray when his rocket crashes on Pluto, either fleeing or leaving the alien Prox system, where he has lived for a decade. Previous to the crash, he has laid the groundwork for distributing a new and more powerful drug, one that does not require a layout, call Chew-Z. Financially threatened, Bulero concocts a plan to neutralize Eldritch, but soon finds himself infused with Chew-Z and trapped in a hallucinatory world also occupied by Eldritch. He tries to enlist Barney’s help in freeing himself. Barney doesn’t, and decides to give all up in despair over his mistakes with Emily. Soon to be drafted for the colonies, he enlists and ends up on Mars. There he too becomes ensnared by Chew-Z and Eldritch. In the end, while exploring the meaning of religion and his mistakes, he seems to escape the hold of Chew-Z, but not entirely. Bulero, who it seems is destined to kill Eldritch, appears to have succeeded, though it may well be the truth he exists in a simulacrum world created by Eldritch to perpetuate his own life.

A Nebula nominated novel, it twists and turns so that in the end the reader, like the characters, find it challenging separating imagined from real. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
The Barbie Doll of Sci-Fi

Who knows if Philip K. Dick ever heard of Barbie (the doll premiered at the 1959 American International Toy Fair in New York City), but Perky Pat and Walt certainly do bring the long-lived fashion toy and her consort Ken to mind. In PKD’s imaginative version of a toy, Perky Pat and her products become the focus of a drug-induced simulacrum affording dispirited colonists throughout the solar system relief from their dreary lives. Can-D is the drug smuggled onto the colonies by the company that markets Perky Pat Layouts and which holds a monopoly on this sort of escapism. That is until Palmer Eldritch appears and sells a rival and more deep acting drug, one that doesn’t require a layout, that is more free form, called Chew-Z. It’s through this vehicle that PKD has his protagonist, precog Barney Mayerson, explore the meaning of religious experience and the existence of a god, while he uses it to correct the mistakes he’s made in his life, primarily his cynical divorce from his wife Emily in pursuit of success in the Perky Pat Layout company.

All this unfolds in a typically dystopian Dick world. Earth has become almost too hot for human life. People cannot walk safely outside, and when they do they must wear special thermal gear. In this future, Antarctica has transformed into a temperate locale and vacation spot for the wealthy. People live in apartments ranked ordered to show status, numbered from one to the thousands starting in New York. Typical of Dick, some people, known as precogs, such as Barney, possess the ability to see into the future. Earth has colonized the entire solar system, conscripts people to populate them, because life in the colonies is hard, isolated, and grubby. One world government, the U.N., presides over all, but leaders are mercenary and it’s the rich who really wield the power with influence and money. As for religion, these tend to be more cultish, such as the Neo-Christianity of the Anne Hawthorne, who helps Barney while in the throes of Chew-Z. And Earth has made contact with civilizations beyond, here Proxima.

The storyline is fairly straightforward, but the conclusion, in PKD fashion, is ambiguous. Leo Bulero founded and runs Perky Pat Layouts. Barney serves as his chief precog, reviewing and picking out all of Pat’s accessories with an eye to maximizing popularity and profits. Bulero also operates an illegal drug business located on Venus, where it manufactures a chewable hallucinate called Can-D and smuggles it to the colonies. The drug, consumed by groups of people in the presence of a Perky Pat layout, allows them to escape to a world reminiscent of an older Earth. To enhance the experience, they buy all manner of items, from cars to tableware, to create realistic layouts, these the source, along with Can-D, of Bulero’s prosperity.

Palmer Eldritch throws Bulero’s and Mayerson’s world into disarray when his rocket crashes on Pluto, either fleeing or leaving the alien Prox system, where he has lived for a decade. Previous to the crash, he has laid the groundwork for distributing a new and more powerful drug, one that does not require a layout, call Chew-Z. Financially threatened, Bulero concocts a plan to neutralize Eldritch, but soon finds himself infused with Chew-Z and trapped in a hallucinatory world also occupied by Eldritch. He tries to enlist Barney’s help in freeing himself. Barney doesn’t, and decides to give all up in despair over his mistakes with Emily. Soon to be drafted for the colonies, he enlists and ends up on Mars. There he too becomes ensnared by Chew-Z and Eldritch. In the end, while exploring the meaning of religion and his mistakes, he seems to escape the hold of Chew-Z, but not entirely. Bulero, who it seems is destined to kill Eldritch, appears to have succeeded, though it may well be the truth he exists in a simulacrum world created by Eldritch to perpetuate his own life.

A Nebula nominated novel, it twists and turns so that in the end the reader, like the characters, find it challenging separating imagined from real. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
It is the late 21st century. Everyone is subject to being drafted by the United Nations, the rulers of Earth. These draftees are not sent to fight in some foreign war. Instead, they are sent on a one-way trip to a human colony on Mars or Ganymede. These are not tall, square-jawed adventurers boldly spreading mankind throughout the solar system.

The only way to relieve the dead-end existence on Mars is with a hallucinogenic drug called Can-D. It transports the user into the idyllic world of a Barbie-like character called Perky Pat. A man named Palmer Eldritch has just returned from a decade-long trip to Proxima Centauri. He is carrying a much more addictive drug called Chew-Z. It promises to get the user closer to God, but in a world controlled by Eldritch.

For those who have never read Philip K. Dick, be prepared for a wild ride. It will take some effort on the part of the reader; parts of it might not be easy to understand. Stick with it; the story is very much worth it. For those who are familiar with Dick's writing, enjoy yourselves. ( )
  plappen | Nov 2, 2021 |
Very bizarre ( )
  KrakenTamer | Oct 23, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 60 (next | show all)
Next year SF celebrates a fairly significant anniversary. It will be 40 years since JG Ballard published The Terminal Beach , Brian Aldiss published Greybeard , William Burroughs published Naked Lunch in the UK, I took over New Worlds magazine and Philip K Dick published The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch . It was a watershed year, if you like, when SF rediscovered its visionary roots and began creating new conventions which rejected both modernism and American pulp traditions.

Perhaps best representing that cusp, Dick's work only rarely achieved the stylistic and imaginative coherence of those other writers. His corporate future came from a common pool created by troubled left-wingers Pohl and Kornbluth ( The Space Merchants , 1953) or Alfred Bester ( The Demolished Man , 1953). His Mars is the harsh but habitable planet of Leigh Brackett ( Queen of the Martian Catacombs , 1949) or Ray Bradbury ( The Martian Chronicles , 1950). His style and characters are indistinguishable from those of a dozen other snappy pulpsters. Even his questioning of the fundamentals of identity and reality is largely unoriginal, preceded by the work of the less prolific but perhaps more profound Charles Harness, who wrote stories such as "Time Trap", "The Paradox Men" and "The Rose" in the 50s.

So how has Dick emerged as today's best-known and admired US SF writer? It's hard to judge from this book (which was promoted enthusiastically by me and many others when it first appeared).
 

» Add other authors (32 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Philip K. Dickprimary authorall editionscalculated
Abadia, GuyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Csernus, TiborCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gudynas, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mohr, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pelham, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennington, BruceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weiner, TomNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williams, PaulAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
I mean, after all; you have to consider we're only made out of dust. That's admittedly not much to go on and we shouldn't forget that. But even considering, I mean it's a sort of bad beginning, we're not doing too bad. So I personally have faith that even in this lousy situation we're faced with we can make it. You get me?
--From an interoffice audio-memo circulated to Pre-Fash level consultants at Perky Pat Layouts, Inc., dictated by Leo Bulero immediately on his return from Mars.
Dedication
First words
His head unnaturally aching, Barney Mayerson woke to find himself in an unfamiliar bedroom in an unfamiliar conapt building.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

On Mars, the harsh climate could make any colonist turn to drugs to escape a dead-end existence. Especially when the drug is Can-D, which transports its users into the idyllic world of a Barbie-esque character named Perky Pat. When the mysterious Palmer Eldritch arrives with a new drug called Chew-Z, he offers a more addictive experience, one that might bring the user closer to God. But in a world where everyone is tripping, no promises can be taken at face value. This Nebula Award nominee is one of Philip K. Dick's enduring classics, at once a deep character study, a dark mystery, and a tightrope walk along the edge of reality and illusion.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Dick, Philip K., 1928-1982.
Τα τρία στίγματα του Πάλμερ Έλντριτς / Φίλιπ Κ. Ντικ · μετάφραση Χατχούτ, Ρένα, εισαγωγή: Δημήτρης Αρβανίτης. - Αθήνα : Ars Longa, 1986. - 262σ. · 21.5x10.3εκ., Η Ανθολογία της Επιστημονικής Φαντασίας.
gre
Γλώσσα πρωτοτύπου: αγγλικά
Τίτλος πρωτοτύπου: The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, Doubleday, 1964.
(Μαλακό εξώφυλλο) [Κυκλοφορούν η 2η έκδοση:Parsec, 2008 και η 3η έκδοση: Κέδρος, 2016, Εξαντλημένο]
813.54
Haiku summary
Can-D or Chew-Z
Perky Pat, Palmer Eldritch
All just empty dreams
(amweb)

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.9)
0.5 1
1 8
1.5 4
2 42
2.5 14
3 206
3.5 61
4 392
4.5 31
5 262

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 173,705,551 books! | Top bar: Always visible