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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
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The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,3192801,835 (4.48)209
"Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life"--… (more)
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» See also 209 mentions

English (274)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  German (1)  All languages (279)
Showing 1-5 of 274 (next | show all)
Oh my GOD this book. Anything I can say won't really do it justice, but THE HATE U GIVE is amazing and is going to turn a lot of heads. I haven't fallen so completely in love with a contemporary YA cast in ages.

Longer RTC. ( )
  allison_s | May 25, 2020 |
I'm speechless, honestly. I hope I can come up with words that are worthy of this book. Thank you, Angie ( )
  hexenlibrarian | May 19, 2020 |
Honestly? This book was amazing. As soon as I started reading it, I couldn't put it down. This needs to be on every highschool reading list. This is a book that white people in particular need to read, because of the amount of damage that we can do without realizing it and because of the amount of good we can do just by being there for those who need it. Don't read this book just to make yourself feel better and don't read this book just to say that you did. Read this book for the bravery that it takes to stand up for something, even when it's hard and frightening. ( )
  Booksunknown23 | May 18, 2020 |
The writing felt rather obvious and simplistic compared to other works that have covered similar ground. I suppose the novelty here is that it's mixed with YA stuff. Perhaps I wasn't the intended audience, but the style of prose and pop culture references felt a little irritating. ( )
  peterbmacd | May 16, 2020 |
This is a book where the reader gets the chance to look inside, where drug lords rule the neighborhood, from the safety of the outside.
Starr lives in the "hood", she's seen two of her good friends killed, one shot by a random bullet delivered by local drug dealers another shot by the hands of a police officer.
Her parents want her to, at least, be safe at school where she can study without distraction so they transfer her to a prestigious high school. She's virtually living in two distinct worlds in which she must reconcile which world she most belongs or perhaps determine if it is possible to safely belong to both.
A well told story with well rounded characters and plausible situations. ( )
  Carmenere | May 6, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 274 (next | show all)
Thomas’s debut novel offers an incisive and engrossing perspective of the life of a black teenage girl as Starr’s two worlds converge over questions of police brutality, justice, and activism.
added by g33kgrrl | editThe Atlantic, Anna Diamond (Mar 28, 2017)
 
The story, with so many issues addressed, can feel overwhelming at times, but then again, so can the life of an African American teen. Debut author Thomas is adept at capturing the voices of multiple characters, and she ultimately succeeds in restoring Starr’s true voice.
 
That hope seems slim indeed these days, but ultimately the book emphasizes the need to speak up about injustice, to have injustice be known even if not punished. That’s a message that will resonate with all young people concerned with fairness, and Starr’s experience will speak to readers who know Starr’s life like their own and provide perspective for others.
 
Beautifully written in Starr’s authentic first-person voice, this is a marvel of verisimilitude as it insightfully examines two worlds in collision. An inarguably important book that demands the widest possible readership.
 
With smooth but powerful prose delivered in Starr’s natural, emphatic voice, finely nuanced characters, and intricate and realistic relationship dynamics, this novel will have readers rooting for Starr and opening their hearts to her friends and family.

This story is necessary. This story is important.
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angie Thomasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Turpin, BahniNarratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Benedek Leila,Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartwright, DebraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mutsaers, JasperTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stempel, JennaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verjovsky Paul, SoniaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
For Grandma, who showed me there can be light in the darkness
First words
I shouldn't have come to this party.
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Book description
Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does-or does not-say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.
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