HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: THUG (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,7913621,316 (4.48)257
"Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life"--… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 257 mentions

English (356)  Spanish (2)  German (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (363)
Showing 1-5 of 356 (next | show all)
I cried my way through much of this. Angie Thomas does an excellent job of juxtaposing violence and injustice with love and supportive family and community. Her characters are nuanced, and her teens are realistically conflicted. Especially striking is her portrayal of the challenge of living daily life while huge events tear things up. Now I can watch the movie. ( )
  ImperfectCJ | Jul 30, 2021 |
Really great book. As an old, white lady it taught me a lot. ( )
  spounds | Jul 30, 2021 |
Thomas’s sure-to-be classic pushes the reader to ponder the importance of one’s voice through a coming-of-age story involving institutional racism, police violence, activism, family dynamics, interracial dating, and more.
  NCSS | Jul 23, 2021 |
Hard to put down. ( )
  emrsalgado | Jul 23, 2021 |
Probably one of the most important books written in younger history. I can't believe this didn't make a bigger impact here in Germany. Okay, maybe because we don't have the problem of cops basically randomly killing black people. I still think that everyone should read this book. It has touched me deeply! Starr is one of the greatest, strongest (female) characters ever created. I found her story often hard to stomach. Especially knowing, that this is not fiction (well, the story of the book is, but not where it comes from), this is the reality in the USA every day. I found the insights I got very interesting. In my country, all we ever hear of cases like these are short mentions on the news, that's it. That book was very educational. It should be a mandatory read at every school. Angie Thomas created a masterpiece.
I'm referring to the Audible audiobook read by Bahni Turpin. She didn't read the story of Starr Carter, she WAS Starr Carter for me. 5 stars to her as well. ( )
  Heidi64 | Jul 18, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 356 (next | show all)
Shot and killed right from the start really was an attention grabber in this book. Angie Thomas wrote a relatable book, especially for this time in our world involving Black Lives Matter, police brutality, implicit bias, and white privilege. I loved how this topic was touched upon because, for some, these matters need to be acknowledged more in this world in order for change.
This book took place in the hood and expressed the difference between the black and white communities. The main character Starr Carter lived two lives; there was one life in the neighborhood of garden heights and then the Starr who attends a prestigious, private white prep school across town. I fell in love with this book and felt excitement every time I picked it up, which says a lot because reading has not always been my favorite thing. I felt like I knew this family and everything they were feeling because the details describing everything were so strong. I watched the main character, Starr, break down just about every moment, I felt like I knew each and everything she was feeling. I also really enjoyed the characters in this story because it was very clear they were all very connected and were there for each other. The relationship between the kids and Starrs parents was unreal, and I treasured how supportive and caring they were.
This book definitely was a little intense with some of the events that occurred, but I do believe it was important because it was necessary for the story line and the problems they faced. Although I really did enjoy this book, I felt that the storyline was the same, meaning similar things continuously happened and events were almost predictable. I would recommend this book 1000% for anyone over the age of 13 because it can get a little intense with the words chose for some scenes. Lastly, I would definitely recommend this to someone who has a lot of interest in these problems going on around the world or enjoys reading about how people persevere through problems.
added by kaileemccabe | editLibraryThing.com, Kailee McCabe (Nov 30, 2020)
 
The first-person narrative is simply beautiful to read, and I felt I was observing the story unfold in 3D as the characters grew flesh and bones inside my mind. The Hate U Give is an outstanding debut novel and says more about the contemporary black experience in America than any book I have read for years, whether fiction or non-fiction. It's a stark reminder that, instead of seeking enemies at its international airports, America should open its eyes and look within if it's really serious about keeping all its citizens safe.
added by Cynfelyn | editThe Guardian, Alex Wheatle (Apr 8, 2017)
 
Thomas’s debut novel offers an incisive and engrossing perspective of the life of a black teenage girl as Starr’s two worlds converge over questions of police brutality, justice, and activism.
added by g33kgrrl | editThe Atlantic, Anna Diamond (Mar 28, 2017)
 
The story, with so many issues addressed, can feel overwhelming at times, but then again, so can the life of an African American teen. Debut author Thomas is adept at capturing the voices of multiple characters, and she ultimately succeeds in restoring Starr’s true voice.
 
That hope seems slim indeed these days, but ultimately the book emphasizes the need to speak up about injustice, to have injustice be known even if not punished. That’s a message that will resonate with all young people concerned with fairness, and Starr’s experience will speak to readers who know Starr’s life like their own and provide perspective for others.
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angie Thomasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Turpin, BahniNarratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Benedek Leila,Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bortolussi, StefanoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartwright, DebraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mutsaers, JasperTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stempel, JennaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verjovsky Paul, SoniaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Grandma, who showed me there can be light in the darkness
First words
I shouldn't have come to this party.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life"--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.48)
0.5
1 6
1.5 1
2 16
2.5 9
3 89
3.5 37
4 389
4.5 114
5 828

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,483,552 books! | Top bar: Always visible