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The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: THUG (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,3474241,071 (4.47)289
"Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life"--… (more)
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» See also 289 mentions

English (407)  Spanish (2)  German (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (414)
Showing 1-5 of 407 (next | show all)
16-year-old Starr witnesses her friend get shot by a police officer who mistakes the hairbrush in his hand for a gun. The Hate U Give is a powerful snapshot of the aftermath of police brutality in a community. Starr confronts her white peers' performative woke-ness, as well as her own internalized biases about blackness. ( )
  librarianlion | Dec 4, 2022 |
All-Around Awesomeness: 5/5
Worldbuilding: 5/5
Characters: 5/5
Plot: 5/5
Writing Quality: 5/5
Recommend: Yes

So good and so very important. This should be required reading in all middle/high schools! You must read this! ( )
  meimeiminimochi | Dec 2, 2022 |
What do you think of when you see the words: Thug Life?

Is it a statement that is scary because it is associated with gang members? Is it a rap/hip hop call for people to gather together? Is it a "black" thing? Or is it an acronym for "The Hate U Give Little Infants F**ks Everyone?"

How you read the words "Thug Life" is a portion of this book as the book seems to revolve around this statement.

Billed as the first Black Lives Matter YA book, the story is about Starr Carter, a 16 year old African American girl who goes to a posh private school outside of her neighborhood. Her father is a former King, a local gang, who got out after serving jail time, but now runs a local store where he looks to help other gang members looking to get out. She has half brothers and sisters who connect her to King and their leader.

Starr finds herself at a party where she runs into an old childhood friend Khalil. She has not seen him in years, but they find themselves talking when a fight breaks out at the party. As they leave, Khalil is pulled over for a broken tail light. While the officer is checking Khalil's license, Khalil moves toward his front door to check on Starr, when three shots ring out. Khalil is killed by the officer with Starr as the only witness.

As Starr decides to participate in the investigation, she finds the system is a rigged against Khalil as a story breaks that he was connected to the Kings. Khalil is turned into a drug dealing thug, even though Starr knows he did nothing that night. As things progress and as a trial begins, tensions begin to form in Starr's lives- her hometown life and her life in her private school where she is one of the few African American students. What happens when all her worlds collide and as justice begins to sway against Kahlil?

From the beginning, we know how a portion of the story will end. We know exactly how it will end, but rather that being bad writing, it reveals what we know about the justice system. In the book, it takes a long time for that story to end though and the tension just builds and builds until it comes to a breaking point when the ending we all know will happen, happens.

There are lots of stories in this book and I liked how the book slightly revolves around the idea of "Thug Life" and what that means. There are "thugs" in the Kings, Starr is seen as a "thug" simply because she is a black woman in a white world, Kahlil is seen as a "thug" even though he was completely innocent, but the main point is when there isn't justice for everyone, it hurts everybody. There is a great speech by the father to Starr as he explains this phrase and the importance of education and opportunities from birth to death, especially for those who do not have privilege.

If there is a critique, it is the book is a bit long and gets a bit lost within all the story lines. It is a big ambitious book which is great, but I think it was just a tad bit too big. There were also some characters who become caricatures of themselves. I didn't mind though and that is being a bit picky.

I found this to be a book that I will recommend to many people. I think it is worth reading by a large group, especially in these times. It tells the BLM from the perspective of an African American woman who is in the center of everything.

I gave this one 4.5 stars. ( )
  Nerdyrev1 | Nov 23, 2022 |
4.5 ( )
  Fortunesdearest | Oct 23, 2022 |
This was my most anticipated book of 2017, hands down. And it was everything I hoped and wanted it to be. And it is such an important book, especially right now.

First, this is a mainstream book that has a black female main character. This is huge, when it's nigh impossible to find main characters of color in YA novels. Not to mention, a YA novel written by an author of color. LOVE.

Second, the topic is one that is super timely given the #BlackLivesMatter movement. And Thomas does a fantastic job actually laying out all the reasons for the movement and the pushback for it.

Third, this is a book that talks about black community and culture, and what it means to be black in the United States. Thomas shows the dichotomy of the two worlds Starr has to live in and how she has to act in both in order to get respect. The book also explains the economic hurdles that poor black communities face, and why many turn to drugs or gangs.

Fourth, this book is just SO EVERYTHING. She talks about microaggressions, about silence implicitly making racist jokes okay, about interracial relationships, and so much more. And above all, the message running throughout the entire book is making your voice be heard and speak out for justice and doing what is right.

I devoured this book and it was a rollercoaster ride. I loved it so much and at the same time hated that it depicted so accurately a world I wish didn't exist. This book is SO IMPORTANT and I hope everybody reads it.

My favorite quote:

What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be? ( )
  wisemetis | Sep 13, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 407 (next | show all)
Shot and killed right from the start really was an attention grabber in this book. Angie Thomas wrote a relatable book, especially for this time in our world involving Black Lives Matter, police brutality, implicit bias, and white privilege. I loved how this topic was touched upon because, for some, these matters need to be acknowledged more in this world in order for change.
This book took place in the hood and expressed the difference between the black and white communities. The main character Starr Carter lived two lives; there was one life in the neighborhood of garden heights and then the Starr who attends a prestigious, private white prep school across town. I fell in love with this book and felt excitement every time I picked it up, which says a lot because reading has not always been my favorite thing. I felt like I knew this family and everything they were feeling because the details describing everything were so strong. I watched the main character, Starr, break down just about every moment, I felt like I knew each and everything she was feeling. I also really enjoyed the characters in this story because it was very clear they were all very connected and were there for each other. The relationship between the kids and Starrs parents was unreal, and I treasured how supportive and caring they were.
This book definitely was a little intense with some of the events that occurred, but I do believe it was important because it was necessary for the story line and the problems they faced. Although I really did enjoy this book, I felt that the storyline was the same, meaning similar things continuously happened and events were almost predictable. I would recommend this book 1000% for anyone over the age of 13 because it can get a little intense with the words chose for some scenes. Lastly, I would definitely recommend this to someone who has a lot of interest in these problems going on around the world or enjoys reading about how people persevere through problems.
added by kaileemccabe | editLibraryThing.com, Kailee McCabe (Nov 30, 2020)
 
The first-person narrative is simply beautiful to read, and I felt I was observing the story unfold in 3D as the characters grew flesh and bones inside my mind. The Hate U Give is an outstanding debut novel and says more about the contemporary black experience in America than any book I have read for years, whether fiction or non-fiction. It's a stark reminder that, instead of seeking enemies at its international airports, America should open its eyes and look within if it's really serious about keeping all its citizens safe.
added by Cynfelyn | editThe Guardian, Alex Wheatle (Apr 8, 2017)
 
Thomas’s debut novel offers an incisive and engrossing perspective of the life of a black teenage girl as Starr’s two worlds converge over questions of police brutality, justice, and activism.
added by g33kgrrl | editThe Atlantic, Anna Diamond (Mar 28, 2017)
 
The story, with so many issues addressed, can feel overwhelming at times, but then again, so can the life of an African American teen. Debut author Thomas is adept at capturing the voices of multiple characters, and she ultimately succeeds in restoring Starr’s true voice.
 
That hope seems slim indeed these days, but ultimately the book emphasizes the need to speak up about injustice, to have injustice be known even if not punished. That’s a message that will resonate with all young people concerned with fairness, and Starr’s experience will speak to readers who know Starr’s life like their own and provide perspective for others.
 

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Thomas, Angieprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Benedek Leila,Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bortolussi, StefanoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartwright, DebraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mutsaers, JasperTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stempel, JennaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turpin, BahniNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verjovsky Paul, SoniaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Grandma, who showed me there can be light in the darkness
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I shouldn't have come to this party.
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"Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life"--

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