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Martians, Go Home (1955)

by Fredric Brown

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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5741732,093 (3.56)20
Martians, Go Home, originally published in 1955, is a comic science fiction novel that tells the story of Luke Devereaux, a science fiction writer who witnesses an alien invasion of little green men. These Martians haven't come to Earth to harm anyone-just to annoy people. Unable to touch the physical world, or be touched by it, they take great pleasure in walking through walls, spying on the private lives of humans-and revealing their every secret. No one knows how to get rid of these obnoxious little aliens, except perhaps Luke. Unfortunately, Mr. Devereaux is going a little bananas, so it may be difficult for him to try-but not impossible.… (more)
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» See also 20 mentions

English (14)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (17)
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
Wow I didn't know what to expect except that this was heralded as one of the best humorous alien invasion novels of all time. Upon reading, it worked quite nicely as pure satire. It didn't even have a tongue in cheek vibe to it. Instead, overnight, we've got 60 million little green aliens from Mars standing around in our living rooms heckling everything we do.

Yikes! This is the complete reversal of MST3K!

And nothing is off limits. Humanity is their version of animals in a zoo, and we can't even blast them away since they just teleport by thought. Yikes!

Better yet, things get wonky in a completely different way, too. Writers and fans of writers who write about writing will get a big kick out of this twist. No spoilers. But it was delightfully hackneyed.

Now, in case you're wondering, it really doesn't have much in common with Mars Attacks, but you know, I like both of these, so for me it's a win/win.

This is a great quick read, and it's thoroughly enjoyable. Absolutely fun, fast paced, and utterly solipsistic. Not that it's a bad thing, mind you. In fact, in this novel, it's pretty fantastic.

Yay for SF humor!
( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
This was another reread as I read it very long ago. I hoped I would find it as fun as I had, and indeed, I did. Part of it is I don't mind it was written back in 1954 when typewriters were a thing. Part of it is that the risqué humor (well, for the times) is about the level that I find amusing.

There is a deeper level to it that I found intriguing. What happens when complete honesty in communication is enforced? Folks who routinely fib in their job (sales people who must tout a new product as the Best You Have Ever Seen or politicians who seem to have a fluid grasp of what is truth) having Martians correct them would seem to be rather nice until you think how polite social lies make the world more pleasant.

This is for folks who don't mind classic science fiction with a dose of humor. ( )
  Jean_Sexton | Feb 20, 2020 |
Luke Deveraux, auteur fraichement divorcé en perte de soi, décide de se retirer en plein désert afin de retrouver la verve littéraire qui débloquera peut-être son prochain roman. Après un réveil brutal où l’alcool coula à flots, il se retrouve face à face avec de petits hommes verts qui, en surnombre, ont subitement envahi la planète terre, et ce, par pur plaisir. S’enchaîne alors une suite d’évènements rapides et surprenants, ne laissant pas de place à l’ennui, le tout sous un ton humoristique, parfois hilarant, et avec une pointe de philosophie sur le sort de l’humanité.
  Emilie6344a18 | Dec 11, 2018 |
SF
  stevholt | Nov 19, 2017 |
Fredric Brown was one of the prolific SF writers from the golden era of the 1940s-1960s. He had dozens of short stories in the pulps and wrote about 30 novels.

I have only tried a couple of his novels and have been disappointed so far. Perhaps his books don't age well or I just don't like his satire. I will try more books by Brown but this one bored me badly. I had to skip ahead to get through it. Should have been a short story. ( )
  ikeman100 | May 7, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Brown, Fredricprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dorémieux, AlainTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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If the peoples of Earth were not prepared for the coming of the Martians, it was their own fault.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Martians, Go Home, originally published in 1955, is a comic science fiction novel that tells the story of Luke Devereaux, a science fiction writer who witnesses an alien invasion of little green men. These Martians haven't come to Earth to harm anyone-just to annoy people. Unable to touch the physical world, or be touched by it, they take great pleasure in walking through walls, spying on the private lives of humans-and revealing their every secret. No one knows how to get rid of these obnoxious little aliens, except perhaps Luke. Unfortunately, Mr. Devereaux is going a little bananas, so it may be difficult for him to try-but not impossible.

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