HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Outsiders Within: Writing on Transracial Adoption (2006)

by Jane Jeong Trenka, Julia Chinyere Oparah, Sun Yung Shin

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
753351,438 (3.7)None
"Explores transracial adoption from adopted adults' perspectives using memoir, reflective/analytical essays, poetry, artwork, film critique, psychology, sociology, critical race, reproductive justice, more. Discusses reasons children become available for international adoption (war, poverty, structural inequities), ramifications of the colorblind ideal for adoptees (dealing with racism, cultural alienation, emotional isolation)"--Provided by publisher.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
Outsiders Within reveals, while transracial adoption is a practice traditionally considered benevolent, it often exacts a heavy emotional, cultural, and even economic toll. Through compelling essays, fiction, poetry, and art, the contributors to this landmark publication carefully explore this most intimate aspect of globalization. Finally, in the unmediated voices of the adults who have matured within it, we find a rarely-considered view of adoption, an institution that pulls apart old families and identities and grafts new ones.

Moving beyond personal narrative, these transracially adopted writers from around the world tackle difficult questions about how to survive the racist and ethnocentric worlds they inhabit, what connects the countries relinquishing their children to the countries importing them, why poor families of color have their children removed rather than supported—about who, ultimately, they are. In their inquiry, they unseat conventional understandings of adoption politics, ultimately reframing the controversy as a debate that encompasses human rights, peace, and reproductive justice. Selected Reading Questionnaire.
  ACRF | Aug 1, 2022 |
Outsiders Within is a really interesting anthology that covers a lot of issues surrounding transracial and transnational adoption. It is very thorough and covers not only the problems that many adoptees have faced over the years, but why transnational adoption has occurred in such great numbers and asks the important questions such as why have the underlying reasons behind transnational adoption not been addressed?

It was interesting to see one of the side-effects of the women's movement in the 1970s. With fewer young women being coerced into carrying unplanned pregnancies to term and giving the babies up for adoption, upper and middle class white couples experienced a dearth of white babies to adopt, hence they turned to other countries for adoption. ( )
  lemontwist | Jan 3, 2010 |
This was a difficult book to read. It is made up of "stories" or articles written by adult transracial/national adoptees. As an adoptive parent I like to read what the experts are saying as they reach adulthood. This book is not a place to look for a warm fuzzy.

The articles are written by different nationalities, all with their own experiences and stories to tell. Most have something they wish their adoptive parents had done differently -- but most also say they still have wonderful relationships with those parents even as they point out the hard stuff.

What this book really, really brought home to me is that as adoptive parents, as our children become young adults we need to make sure they are aware of and take advantage of adult adoptee groups if they are interested. Over and over the adoptee's relate that they never felt a 100% fit in their white homes or communities or in their native communities. In one group they don't look like a match, and in the group they match they act too white or American (or British or Canadian....). The place they all seem to point out as a "safe" place that they fit in and were understood were in the adoptee groups. NOT parent/adoptee groups, their own group where they are free to express themselves without hurting their loved ones.

Another thing that so many of them pointed out is that so much of the "research" and studies on transracial/national adoption with all the good results, first tend to be based on younger children, and second, the experts tend to be white social workers, doctors, adoption workers, adoptive parents ,etc., not from actual adoptees. Hopefully that will change in the future because most of these adoptee's tend to discount those findings as done by people without a clue or with an agenda to support.

A good read. This is a book I will keep. ( )
  autumnesf | Jan 7, 2008 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Trenka, Jane Jeongprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Oparah, Julia Chinyeremain authorall editionsconfirmed
Shin, Sun Yungmain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
To the transracial/national adoptee holding this book: We are grateful Outsiders Within has found its way into your hands. It is our gift to you. We hope that you will find something here that will stretch your imagination, something that will offer you a perspective that you didn't see before. May these essays and memoirs offer you guidance, camaraderie, and perhaps a roadmap for your long journey. May they give you the courage to share your own story with someone who comes after you.
First words
For those Chinese girls we see with their "forever families" on urban sidewalks; for those Korean kids growing up on farms in rural America; for those African American kids single-handedly integrating small-town schools in British Columbia; for the children bought with the bribes of American dollars; for our sisters who have been kidnapped and sold; for the children who are deemed "unadoptable" -- we must witness.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

"Explores transracial adoption from adopted adults' perspectives using memoir, reflective/analytical essays, poetry, artwork, film critique, psychology, sociology, critical race, reproductive justice, more. Discusses reasons children become available for international adoption (war, poverty, structural inequities), ramifications of the colorblind ideal for adoptees (dealing with racism, cultural alienation, emotional isolation)"--Provided by publisher.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.7)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 4
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 202,115,267 books! | Top bar: Always visible