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Treasury of Women's Quotations (1992)

by Carolyn Warner

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151None159,255 (3.5)1
"When nationally known educational and political leader Carolyn Warner gives a speech, she never gets cotton mouth or wobbly knees. That's because each time she strides up to the podium, she's not alone. She's armed with the thoughts and beliefs of some of the most remarkable people who ever lived: the inspiring quotations of great women past and present. Now this powerful communication tool can be yours - with The Last Word: A Treasury of Women's Quotes." "From the uplifting ("If you have knowledge, let others light their candles at it" - Margaret Fuller) to the moving ("Loneliness is the most terrible poverty" - Mother Teresa) to the downright comic ("Too much of a good thing can be wonderful" - Mae West), this cornucopia of unforgettable sayings will build your confidence, liven up any talk or presentation, and help you deliver your message in an exciting, effective way." "Find out exactly how to use quotations to get the audience on your side. You'll learn how quotations can be used to validate your point of view; evoke emotions your own words might not arouse; establish a common bond by quoting a respected person; vary the pace of your remarks; reinforce and illustrate a point; demonstrate that a mind perhaps greater than yours has expressed your point of view; and get a laugh (nothing wrong with that!)." "Dividing The Last Word into forty handy-reference chapters such as "Attitude," "Courage, "Friendship," "Humor," "Heritage," "Self-Image," "Vision," and "Work," Warner begins each chapter with an unbeatable guide to working notable sayings into your speech. She tells how to achieve the response you want from your listeners, whether you're seeking to motivate, amuse, or empower them. Moreover, she identifies what categories of quotations work best for different kinds of speeches, which create a mood or feeling...which inform and educate...which serve to humanize the speaker. The Last Word is also brimming with advice on how to communicate more effectively overall. And it provides helpful hints that enable women and men to conquer the all-too-common fear of public speaking." "From Eleanor Roosevelt to Rita Mae Brown, from Golda Meir to Anais Nin, from Margaret Sanger to Lily Tomlin, this is a rich collection of some of the most profound thoughts ever voiced and the wittiest comments ever made. It's the secret to transforming any talk into a stirring event. You'll find this book irresistible to browse through, even as you turn to it again and again for each speaking engagement you face. Be sure to keep it handy while preparing your remarks - because, as the actress Ruth Gordon once said, "The best impromptu speeches are the ones written well in advance.""--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved… (more)
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First published as The Last Word: A Treasury of Women's Quotes; later as Treasury of Women's Quotations
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"When nationally known educational and political leader Carolyn Warner gives a speech, she never gets cotton mouth or wobbly knees. That's because each time she strides up to the podium, she's not alone. She's armed with the thoughts and beliefs of some of the most remarkable people who ever lived: the inspiring quotations of great women past and present. Now this powerful communication tool can be yours - with The Last Word: A Treasury of Women's Quotes." "From the uplifting ("If you have knowledge, let others light their candles at it" - Margaret Fuller) to the moving ("Loneliness is the most terrible poverty" - Mother Teresa) to the downright comic ("Too much of a good thing can be wonderful" - Mae West), this cornucopia of unforgettable sayings will build your confidence, liven up any talk or presentation, and help you deliver your message in an exciting, effective way." "Find out exactly how to use quotations to get the audience on your side. You'll learn how quotations can be used to validate your point of view; evoke emotions your own words might not arouse; establish a common bond by quoting a respected person; vary the pace of your remarks; reinforce and illustrate a point; demonstrate that a mind perhaps greater than yours has expressed your point of view; and get a laugh (nothing wrong with that!)." "Dividing The Last Word into forty handy-reference chapters such as "Attitude," "Courage, "Friendship," "Humor," "Heritage," "Self-Image," "Vision," and "Work," Warner begins each chapter with an unbeatable guide to working notable sayings into your speech. She tells how to achieve the response you want from your listeners, whether you're seeking to motivate, amuse, or empower them. Moreover, she identifies what categories of quotations work best for different kinds of speeches, which create a mood or feeling...which inform and educate...which serve to humanize the speaker. The Last Word is also brimming with advice on how to communicate more effectively overall. And it provides helpful hints that enable women and men to conquer the all-too-common fear of public speaking." "From Eleanor Roosevelt to Rita Mae Brown, from Golda Meir to Anais Nin, from Margaret Sanger to Lily Tomlin, this is a rich collection of some of the most profound thoughts ever voiced and the wittiest comments ever made. It's the secret to transforming any talk into a stirring event. You'll find this book irresistible to browse through, even as you turn to it again and again for each speaking engagement you face. Be sure to keep it handy while preparing your remarks - because, as the actress Ruth Gordon once said, "The best impromptu speeches are the ones written well in advance.""--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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