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Batch: Media Country

August 2016 batch: Requests must be in by Monday, August 29th at 6pm EST.

Our Hearts Will Burn Us Down by Anne Valente (William Morrow)

Description: The lives of four teenagers are capsized by a shocking school shooting and its aftermath in this powerful debut novel, a coming-of-age story with the haunting power of Station Eleven and the bittersweet poignancy of Everything I Never Told You.

As members of the yearbook committee, Nick, Zola, Matt, and Christina are eager to capture all the memorable moments of their junior year at Lewis and Clark High School—the plays and football games, dances and fund-drives, teachers and classes that are the epicenter of their teenage lives. But how do you document a horrific tragedy—a deadly school shooting by a classmate?

Struggling to comprehend this cataclysmic event—and propelled by a sense of responsibility to the town, their parents, and their school—these four "lucky" survivors vow to honor the memories of those lost, and also, the memories forgotten in the shadow of violence. But the shooting is only the first inexplicable trauma to rock their small suburban St. Louis town. A series of mysterious house fires have hit the families of the victims one by one, pushing the grieving town to the edge.

Nick, the son of the lead detective investigating the events, plunges into the case on his own, scouring the Internet to uncover what could cause a fire with no evident starting point. As their friend pulls farther away, Matt and Christina battle to save damaged relationships, while Zola fights to keep herself together.

A story of grief, community, and family, of the search for understanding and normalcy in the wake of devastating loss, Our Hearts Will Burn Us Down by debut author Anne Valente explores profound questions about resiliency, memory, and recovery that brilliantly illuminate the deepest recesses of the human heart.

» Publisher information

35 review copies available
1066 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 04

Butter: A Rich History by Elaine Khosrova (Algonquin Books)

Description: The delicious kitchen staple we so often take for granted is not merely a stick tucked into our refrigerator door. It’s a culinary catalyst, an agent of change, a gastronomic rock star. From its accidental invention in a long-ago herder’s pouch to its ubiquitous presence in the world’s most fabulous cuisines, butter is boss. Now, it finally gets its due.

Award-winning food writer and chef Elaine Khosrova serves up a story as rich, textured, and culturally relevant as butter itself. From the ancient butter bogs of Ireland to the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Butter is about so much more than food. Khosrova details its surprisingly vital role in history, politics, economics, nutrition, even spirituality and art. From its humble agrarian origins to its present-day artisanal glory, butter has a fascinating story to tell, and Khosrova is the perfect person to tell it. She even includes the essential collection of carefully developed core butter recipes, from beurre manié and croissants to pâte brisée and the perfect buttercream frosting, and provides practical how-tos for making various types of butter at home — no churning necessary.

» Publisher information

35 review copies available
896 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Nov 15

For the Love of Meat by Jenny Jaeckel (Raincloud Press)

Description: This collection combines whimsical and surreal illustrations with engaging, intimate encounters that explore the depths of the human experience. Unique and diverse in setting, and with touches of magical-realism, these nine stories will tug at the strings of the wandering, romantic heart setting it delightfully ablaze. Included is a story about a nun who finds herself stranded in the Mexican desert with nothing but a few cobs of corn and a stray horse, a story of a young Londoner who travels to Vancouver where a handsome stranger entices her to take a leap into the unknown, and a story told from the stunning perspective of a slave who, as a child, witnesses the brutal murder of her mother, and survives through her connection to her brother and the natural world. The compelling storytelling takes readers across the world and through the ages, with remarkable insight and soul-moving moments, when paths cross and time unfolds. The author’s language, imagery, and attention to detail plunge the reader into these memorable lives that include adventure, courage, love, loss, longing and all the hope in between.

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30 review copies available
454 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 20

Soulmates by Jessica Grose (William Morrow)

Description: A clever, timely novel about a marriage, and infidelity, the meaning of true spirituality, perception and reality from the author of Sad Desk Salad, in which a scorned ex-wife tries to puzzle out the pieces of her husband’s mysterious death at a yoga retreat and their life together.
It’s been two years since the divorce, and Dana has moved on. She’s killing it at her law firm, she’s never looked better, thanks to all those healthy meals she cooks, and she’s thrown away Ethan’s ratty old plaid recliner. She hardly thinks about her husband—ex-husband—anymore, or about how the man she’d known since college ran away to the Southwest with a yoga instructor, spouting spiritual claptrap that Dana still can’t comprehend.
But when she sees Ethan’s picture splashed across the front page of the New York Post—"Nama-Slay: Yoga Couple Found Dead in New Mexico Cave"—Dana discovers she hasn’t fully let go of Ethan or the past. The article implies that it was a murder-suicide, and Ethan’s to blame. How could the man she once loved so deeply be a killer? Restless to find answers that might help her finally to let go, Dana begins to dig into the mystery surrounding Ethan’s death. Sifting through the clues of his life, Dana finds herself back in the last years of their marriage . . . and discovers that their relationship—like Ethan’s death—wasn’t what it appeared to be.
A novel of marriage, meditation, and all the spaces in between, Soulmates is a page-turning mystery, a delicious satire of our feel-good spiritual culture, and a nuanced look at contemporary relationships by one of the sharpest writers working today.

» Publisher information

30 review copies available
819 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Sep 27

Forty Autumns by Nina Willner (William Morrow)

Description: In this illuminating and deeply moving memoir, a former American military intelligence officer goes beyond traditional Cold War espionage tales to tell the true story of her family—of five women separated by the Iron Curtain for more than forty years, and their miraculous reunion after the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Forty Autumns makes visceral the pain and longing of one family forced to live apart in a world divided by two. At twenty, Hanna escaped from East to West Germany. But the price of freedom—leaving behind her parents, eight siblings, and family home—was heartbreaking. Uprooted, Hanna eventually moved to America, where she settled down with her husband and had children of her own.
Growing up near Washington, D.C., Hanna’s daughter, Nina Willner became the first female Army Intelligence Officer to lead sensitive intelligence operations in East Berlin at the height of the Cold War. Though only a few miles separated American Nina and her German relatives—grandmother Oma, Aunt Heidi, and cousin, Cordula, a member of the East German Olympic training team—a bitter political war kept them apart.
In Forty Autumns, Nina recounts her family’s story—five ordinary lives buffeted by circumstances beyond their control. She takes us deep into the tumultuous and terrifying world of East Germany under Communist rule, revealing both the cruel reality her relatives endured and her own experiences as an intelligence officer, running secret operations behind the Berlin Wall that put her life at risk.
A personal look at a tenuous era that divided a city and a nation, and continues to haunt us, Forty Autumns is an intimate and beautifully written story of courage, resilience, and love—of five women whose spirits could not be broken, and who fought to preserve what matters most: family.
Forty Autumns is illustrated with dozens of black-and-white and color photographs.

» Publisher information

30 review copies available
650 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 04

Bertrand Court by Michelle Brafman (Prospect Park Books)

Description: NEW FICTION FROM THE ACCLAIMED AUTHOR OF WASHING THE DEAD

Bertrand Court intertwines seventeen luminous narratives about the secrets of an unforgettable cast of politicos, filmmakers, and housewives, all tied to a suburban D.C. cul-de-sac. Linked through bloodlines and grocery lines, they respond to life’s bruises by grabbing power, sex, or the family silver. As they atone and forgive, they unmask the love and truth that hop white picket fences.

» Publisher information

25 review copies available
426 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Sep 06

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult (Random House)

Description: In her highly-anticipated new novel, SMALL GREAT THINGS, Jodi tackles the profoundly challenging yet essential con­cerns of our time: prejudice, race, and justice.

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25 review copies available
1271 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 11

The Mortifications by Derek Palacio (Crown Publishing)

Description: Spanning the globe and several decades, Derek Palacio's stunning, mythic novel marks the arrival of a fresh voice in the tradition of the American epic and opens a new chapter in the history of twenty-first-century Cuban-American literature.
In 1980, during the traumatic Mariel Boatlift, a small Cuban family suffers irreparable damage. Uxbal Encarnación—father, husband, political insurgent—refuses to leave behind the revolutionary ideals and lush tomato farms of his sun-soaked homeland. Soledad—fierce enough to hold a blade to her own child's throat—takes young Isabel and Ulises hostage and flees with them to America, leaving behind Uxbal for the promise of a better life. But instead of settling with fellow Cuban immigrants in Miami's familiar heat, the Encarnacións push farther northward into the stark, wintry landscape of Hartford, Connecticut. There, in the long shadow of their estranged patriarch, now just a distant memory, the exiled mother and her children begin a process of growth and transformation.
Each struggles and flourishes in his or her own way as they seek their own identities: Isabel, spiritually hungry and desperate for higher purpose, finds herself tethered to death and the dying in uncanny ways. Meanwhile, Ulises is bookish and awkwardly tall, but of the earth like his father, whose memory haunts and shapes the boy's thoughts and desires. Presiding over both is severe yet sensuous Soledad. Once consumed by her love for her husband, she forges new darkly romantic and sexual ground with Henri Willems, a Dutch tobacco farmer with ambitious capitalist dreams. But just as the Encarnacións begin to cultivate their strange new way of life, Cuba calls them back. Uxbal is alive, and waiting.
Breathtaking, soulful, and profound, The Mortifications is an intoxicating family saga and a timely, urgent expression of longing for one's true homeland.

» Publisher information

25 review copies available
511 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 04

Valley of the Moon by Melanie Gideon (Ballantine Books)

Description: The author of the critically acclaimed Wife 22 has written a captivating novel about a love that transcends time—perfect for readers of The Time Traveler’s Wife, Time and Again, and the novels of Alice Hoffman.

San Francisco, 1975. A single mother, Lux Lysander is overwhelmed, underpaid, and living on the edge of an emotional precipice. When her adored five-year-old son goes away to visit his grandparents, Lux takes a solo trip to Sonoma Valley—a chance to both lose herself and find herself again.

Awakened at midnight, Lux steps outside to see a fog settled over the Sonoma landscape. Wandering toward a point of light in the distance, she emerges into a meadow on a sunny day. There she meets a group of people whose sweetly simple clothing, speech, and manners almost make them seem as if they are from another time.

And then she realizes they are.

Lux has stumbled upon an idyllic community cut off not only from the rest of the world but from time itself. The residents of Greengage tell a stunned and disoriented Lux that they’ve somehow been marooned in the early twentieth century. Now that she has inexplicably stepped into the past, it is not long before Lux is drawn in by its peace and beauty.

Unlike the people of Greengage, Lux discovers that she is able to come and go. And over the years, Lux finds herself increasingly torn between her two lives. Her beloved son is very much a child of the modern world, but she feels continually pulled back to the only place she has ever truly felt at home.

A gorgeous, original, and deeply moving novel about love and longing and the power that time holds over all of us, Valley of the Moon is unforgettable.

» Publisher information

25 review copies available
1026 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Jul 26

"All the Real Indians Died Off" and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Beacon Press)

Description: Unpacks the twenty-one most common myths and misconceptions about Native Americans

“All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans critically deconstructs persistent myths about American Indians that have taken hold in the United States. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture (“Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcoholism”) and history (“Columbus Discovered America”) and trace how they developed. They deftly show how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of the settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land, and that they can be traced to narratives of erasure and disappearance.

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25 review copies available
741 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 04

Ford Flathead Engines: How to Rebuild & Modify by Tony Thacker (CarTech Books)

Description: Although not the first V-8 engine ever produced, Henry Ford's side-valve V-8, launched in 1932, certainly qualified as the first mass-produced V-8 sold to the public. Because of Henry Ford's stubbornness, the first versions were less than ideal. The technology was in its infancy and cost-cutting measures limited the output and reliability of the early models. Over time, however, the "Flattie" became the go-to powerplant for a whole generation of new hobbyists who were called "hot rodders." The engine maintained its position in the hobby well into the 1950s, even when more modern overhead-valve designs started coming out of Detroit. It's hard to overstate the impact that this simple little engine had on a whole generation of enthusiasts. Even today, people choose a flathead for period-correct builds over far more powerful options. The style and sound of a modified flathead is an iconic part of American history.In Ford Flathead Engines: How to Rebuild & Modify, veteran author Tony Thacker and flathead guru of H&H Flatheads, Mike Herman, take you step-by-step through rebuilding a vintage flathead. One of the most important steps is to actually find a good, usable core; many have been sitting for a very long time and the engine design is prone to cracking. Running changes are also an important consideration when selecting a core, and include cooling system, ignition, and transmission mount. After you have selected a core, Thacker and Herman take you through the entire process of a rebuild, including teardown, parts inspection, machine shop processes, replacement part selection, re-assembly, start up, and break-in. Also covered is a unique performance build completed at the H&H shop for legendary race car team manager and all-around enthusiast Ray Evernham. It all adds up to more than 500 color photos and insider tips on building what could be called the most iconic engine ever built, the Ford flathead V-8.

» Publisher information

25 review copies available
165 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 15

Hot Rod Gallery II: More Great Photos and Stories from Hot Rodding's Golden Years by Pat Ganahl (CarTech Books)

Description: In the best-selling original book, Hot Rod Gallery: A Nostalgic Look at Hot Rodding’s Golden Years: 1930-1960, author and historian Pat Ganahl opened his archives and shared 192 pages and 350 photos of "some" of the most interesting and best photos of his collection. Filled with fascinating images of some of the coolest cars and builders, long-forgotten car clubs, and great shots of the dry lakes, nostalgia fans flocked to grab a piece of hot rodding history all in one convenient package. Well, if some is good, more is better, right?" In Hot Rod Gallery II: More Great Photos and Stories from Hot Rodding's Golden Years, Ganahl dug deeper into his massive archive for even cooler and more never-before-seen photos in both color and black and white to provide another album of great hot rodding photos. He was pleasantly surprised to find that he had more great stuff in old files and folders, hidden away for decades. In this edition are even more dry lakes shots, post-war rods, lead sleds, show circuit cars, and a chapter on marvelous mills. He even dug a little deeper into the early 1960s.If you liked the first edition of Hot Rod Gallery by Pat Ganahl: A Nostalgic Look at Hot Rodding's Golden Years: 1930-1960, you may like this one even more. Ganahl guarantees that it is filled with images you have never seen, and he offers his commentary and a lifetime of expertise in this selection of fantastic images from his expansive archive. You can spend hours looking at all the details and soaking in the history in these images, and we know you’ll enjoy this book as much as you did the first.

» Publisher information

25 review copies available
244 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 15

Powered by Girl: A Field Guide for Supporting Youth Activists by Lyn Mikel Brown (Beacon Press)

Description: A playbook for working with and training girls to be activists of their own social movements

Armed with a rich array of online media platforms, seemingly endless reserves of creativity, and a keen sense of justice, girl activists are getting things done. But scholar and activist Lyn Mikel Brown knows that for every provocative news story about one “exceptional” girl out to change the world, there is a strong network of passionate adults and seasoned activists behind her.

Drawing from a diverse collection of interviews with women and girl activists, Powered by Girl is both a journalistic exploration of how girls have embraced activism and a guide for adults who want to support their organizing. Here we learn about the intergenerational support behind thirteen-year-old Julia Bluhm, when she got Seventeen to go Photoshop free; nineteen-year-old Celeste Montaño, who pressed Google to diversify their Doodles; and sixteen-year-old Yas Necati, who campaigns for better sex education in the UK. And we learn what experienced adult activists like Joanne Smith of Girls for Gender Equity and Dana Edell of SPARK Movement say about how to scaffold girls’ social-change work. Brown argues that adults shouldn’t encourage girls to “lean in.” Rather, girls should be supported in creating their own movements—disrupting the narrative, developing their own ideas—on their own terms.

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25 review copies available
306 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Sep 13

The Boy Who Runs by John Brant (Ballantine Books)

Description: In the tradition of Uzodinma Iweala’s Beasts of No Nation by way of Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run, this is the inspirational true story of the Ugandan boy soldier who became a world-renowned runner, then found his calling as director of a world-renowned African children’s charity.

“Julius can’t remember who first saw the men. He heard no warning sounds—no dog barking or twig snapping. Until this point, events had moved too swiftly for Julius to be afraid, but now panic seized him. In another instant, he realized that his old life was finished.”

Thus begins the extraordinary odyssey of Julius Achon, a journey that takes a barefoot twelve-year-old boy from a village in northern Uganda to the rebel camp of the notorious Lord’s Resistance Army, where he was made a boy soldier, and then, miraculously, to a career as one of the world’s foremost middle-distance runners. But when a devastating tragedy prevents Julius from pursuing the gold at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, he is once again set adrift and forced to forge a new path for himself, finally finding his true calling as an internationally recognized humanitarian. Today, Julius is the director of the Achon Uganda Children’s Fund, a charity whose mission is to improve the quality of life in rural Uganda through access to healthcare, education, and athletics.

While pursuing his destiny, Julius encounters a range of unforgettable characters who variously befriend and betray him: the demonic Joseph Kony, a “world-class warlord”; John Cook, a brilliant and eccentric U.S. track coach; Jim Fee, an American businessman who helps Julius build a state-of-the-art medical center deep in the Ugandan bush; and finally Kristina, Julius’s mother, whose own tragic journey forms the pivot for this spellbinding narrative of love, loss, suffering, and redemption.

Written by award-winning sportswriter John Brant, The Boy Who Runs is an empowering tale of obstacles overcome, challenges met, and light wrested from darkness. It’s a story about forging your true path and finding your higher purpose—even when the road ahead bends in unexpected directions.

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25 review copies available
419 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 16

Bob Stevenson by Richard Wiley (Bellevue Literary Press)

Description: A psychiatrist falls for a charismatic patient and must unravel the mystery of his identity

“Haunted—in a good way—by the ghost of Robert Louis Stevenson. . . . . A romantic comedy with just enough of a philosophical edge.” —Kirkus Reviews

“A witty, roller-coaster ride of uncertain identity set against the gritty certainties of
New York City. In compelling, unadorned prose, Richard Wiley gives us a bewitching and ultimately moving tale.” —Caryl Phillips, author of A Distant Shore and The Lost Child

Dr. Ruby Okada meets a charming man with a Scottish accent in the elevator of her psychiatric hospital. Unaware that he is an escaping patient, she falls under his spell, and her life and his are changed forever by the time they get to the street.

Who is the mysterious man? Is he Archie B. Billingsly, suffering from dissociative identity disorder and subject to brilliant flights of fancy and bizarre, violent fits? Or is he the reincarnation of Robert Louis Stevenson, back to haunt New York as Long John Silver and Mr. Edward Hyde? Her career compromised, Ruby soon learns that her future and that of her unborn child depend on finding the key to his identity.

With compelling psychological descriptions and terrifying, ineffable transformations, Bob Stevenson is an ingenious tale featuring a quirky cast of characters drawn together by mutual fascination, need, and finally, love.

» Publisher information

20 review copies available
672 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 11

Dear Mr. M by Herman Koch (Crown Publishing)

Description: Once a celebrated writer, M had his greatest success with a suspense novel based on a real-life disappearance. It told the story of a history teacher who went missing one winter after his brief affair with a stunning pupil. Upon publication, M's novel was a bestseller, one that marked his international breakthrough.
That was years ago, and now M's career is fading. But not when it comes to his bizarre, seemingly timid neighbor who keeps a close eye on him. Why?
In Dear Mr. M, Herman Koch tells the dark tale of a writer in decline, a teenage couple in love, a missing teacher, and a single book that entwines all of their fates.

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20 review copies available
816 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Sep 06

From Ashes Into Light by Gudrun Mouw (Raincloud Press)

Description: From Ashes Into Light is the winner of the 2016 International Book Awards in Visionary Fiction and New Age Fiction.

From Ashes into Light is a transpersonal tale of epic tragedy, spirituality, family, and personal redemption. It is told through three distinct voices: the hauntingly tragic story of Ruth, a Jewish adolescent during Kristallnacht in World War II Austria, Saqapaya, a stalwart Native American from coastal California during the time of the Spanish conquest, and Friede Mai.

Friede is born during WW II to a Bavarian soldier and a East-Prussian mother. As those around her struggle with the inevitable chaos and paradox of war, Friede opens her heart to gruesome enemies, at times saving herself and family members from atrocities. With war behind them, the Mai family immigrates to the US, where Friede, her veteran father and ex-refugee mother, struggle with the reverberations of trauma. Friede is unable to find inner freedom until she meets her spiritual guide, a Rabbi, who helps her see that the voices from the past are teachers and the horrors of history are also beacons of light.

Three electric characters weave a narrative of raw consciousness, a moving example of transforming the ripple of suffering through the incredible strength of vulnerability.

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20 review copies available
482 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Feb 26

Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood (Crown Publishing)

Description: William Shakespeare's The Tempest retold by Margaret Atwood, New York Times bestseller and winner of the Man Booker Prize
Felix is at the top of his game as Artistic Director of the Makeshiweg Theatre Festival. His productions have amazed and confounded. Now he's staging a Tempest like no other: not only will it boost his reputation, it will heal emotional wounds.

Or that was the plan. Instead, after an act of unforeseen treachery, Felix is living in exile in a backwoods hovel, haunted by memories of his beloved lost daughter, Miranda. And also brewing revenge.

After twelve years, revenge finally arrives in the shape of a theatre course at a nearby prison. Here, Felix and his inmate actors will put on his Tempest and snare the traitors who destroyed him. It's magic! But will it remake Felix as his enemies fall?

Margaret Atwood's novel take on Shakespeare's play of enchantment, retribution, and second chances leads us on an interactive, illusion-ridden journey filled with new surprises and wonders of its own.

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20 review copies available
1296 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 11

Human Acts by Han Kang (Crown Publishing)

Description: In the midst of a violent student uprising in South Korea, a young boy named Dong-ho is shockingly killed. The story of this tragic episode unfolds in a sequence of interconnected chapters as the victims and the bereaved encounter suppression, denial, and the echoing agony of the massacre. From Dong-ho's best friend who meets his own fateful end; to an editor struggling against censorship; to a prisoner and a factory worker, each suffering from traumatic memories; and to Dong-ho's own grief-stricken mother; and through their collective heartbreak and acts of hope is the tale of a brutalized people in search of a voice.

An award-winning, controversial bestseller, Human Acts is a timeless, pointillist portrait of an historic event with reverberations still being felt today, by turns tracing the harsh reality of oppression and the resounding, extraordinary poetry of humanity.

» Publisher information

20 review copies available
585 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Jan 17

I Am No One by Patrick Flannery (Crown Publishing)

Description: After a decade of living in England, Jeremy O'Keefe returns to New York, where he has been hired as a professor of German history at New York University. Though comfortable in his new life, and happy to be near his daughter once again, Jeremy continues to feel the quiet pangs of loneliness. Walking through the city at night, it's as though he could disappear and no one would even notice.
But soon, Jeremy's life begins taking strange turns: boxes containing records of his online activity are delivered to his apartment, a young man seems to be following him, and his elderly mother receives anonymous phone calls slandering her son. Why, he wonders, would anyone want to watch him so closely, and, even more upsetting, why would they alert him to the fact that he was being watched?
As Jeremy takes stock of the entanglements that marked his years abroad, the memory of an Egyptian woman he loved in Oxford leads him to wonder if he has unwittingly committed a crime so serious that he might soon be faced with his own denaturalization. Moving toward a shattering reassessment of what it means to be free in a time of evermore intrusive surveillance, Jeremy is forced to ask himself whether he is "no one," as he believes, or a traitor not just to his country but to everyone around him.

» Publisher information

20 review copies available
905 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Jul 05

Mexico by Josh Barkan (Crown Publishing)

Description: The characters in Josh Barkan's remarkable story collection Mexico are ordinary people—everyday citizens, expats, and travelers visiting the country for their own reasons—who find themselves inexorably caught up in and impacted by the criminality and brutality of the Mexican cartels. In these pages readers will meet a tourist who is kidnapped off the street, a teacher whose students risk death if they fall in love with the wrong person, a chef who must cook for a gangster under pain of death, a plastic surgeon forced to alter a fugitive drug lord's appearance, and many more compelling and memorable characters suddenly thrust into harrowing, life-changing situations. But for all that the characters in Mexico have their lives touched by crime, these are much more than simple "crime stories." Rather, they are complicated and deeply human tales that touch on universally recognizable themes such as a parent's desire to connect with their children, an idealistic belief in young love, and the struggle to maintain faith in a world full of hardship. Josh Barkan has a keen eye for detail and an authentic sense of place, polished over many years spent living in Mexico, and he brings this world to life with uncommon grace. As extreme as the events in these stories may be, they are always grounded in recognizable and relatable human characters. Readers will see themselves in these pages, which makes the unflinching portrait of drug violence all the more powerful.

» Publisher information

20 review copies available
414 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Jan 24

More Sonnets from the Portuguese by Janet C.M. Eldred (Whitepoint Press)

Description: More Sonnets from the Portuguese is a sonnet novella that chronicles one year in the life of Zélia Nunes, a widow in her mid-40s. When Zélia receives an email from an ex-lover, her powerful inner longings threaten long-held traditions of Azorean-American and Azorean life; these poems are rooted in the language, imagery, and stories of land and sea, family, labor, spirituality, and Catholicism. Though this sonnet novella is decidedly secular, the narrative is structured liturgically, a mode of tracking time in Azorean communities that is as strong as agricultural seasons and more salient than months, seasons, and school calendars. Capturing the essence of a very visible culture, Silicon Valley, and a mostly invisible one, the San Joaquin Valley, More Sonnets from the Portuguese is familiar and exotic.

Winners will receive bound galleys.

Advance Praise:

“The delightful playfulness of Eldred’s language enhances her sonnet cycle chronicling how this cyber-love both blesses and tortures the lonely hours of Zélia’s widowhood, when she tries to restrain herself to only ‘undress in bytes’ – an archetypal story charmingly recast in 21st-century terms.” —Jill Allyn Rosser, author of Mimi’s Trapeze

“Many writers capture the pleasures of young love, but Janet Eldred shocks us with the voltage of late life’s passions. The sonnets unravel the intricate, densely woven cables through which the memories of passion move—moments of loss, skin, longing, compromise, duty—across the falsely secure networks of virtual reconnection. This is a volume so intimate and wise it needs to be read in solitude.” —Teresa Magnum, author of Married, Middlebrow, and Militant: Sarah Grand and the New Woman Novel

“More Sonnets from the Portuguese tells a poignant and powerful tale about passion suppressed, rekindled, and magnified through years of deep longing and restraint. Elizabeth Barrett Browning would surely applaud.” —Lillian Faderman, author of Naked in the Promised Land

» Publisher information

20 review copies available
262 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Nov 19

The Bear Who Wasn’t There by Oren Lavie and Wolf Erlbruch (Akashic Books)

Description: A magical, lyrical picture book debut from acclaimed composer and playwright Oren Lavie, illustrated by beloved German illustrator Wolf Erlbruch.

One day, a few minutes after Once Upon a Time, a bear awakes to find he has lost something very important: himself! He sets out into the Fabulous Forest to find himself, using only a few clues scrawled on a piece of paper: the bear he's looking for is a nice bear; he is a happy bear; and he's very handsome too! These sound like pretty good qualities to Bear, and so begins his memorable journey. With the help of Fabulous Forest critters like the Convenience Cow, the Lazy Lizard, and the Penultimate Penguin, Bear finds that he himself is just what he's been looking for all along: a nice, happy bear—and handsome too!

As whimsical as Winnie-the-Pooh and as wryly comic as Klassen's bear who wants his hat back, The Bear Who Wasn't There joins a select crew of unusual bears who have captured the imagination of children for generations.

» Publisher information

20 review copies available
705 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Oct 04

The Fifth Petal by Brunonia Barry (Crown Publishing)

Description: Salem's chief of police, John Rafferty, now married to gifted lace reader Towner Whitney, investigates a 25-year-old triple homicide dubbed "The Goddess Murders," in which three young women, all descended from accused Salem witches, were slashed one Halloween night. Aided by Callie Cahill, the daughter of one of the victims who has returned to town, Rafferty begins to uncover a dark chapter in Salem's past. Callie, who has always been gifted with premonitions, begins to struggle with visions she doesn't quite understand and an attraction to a man who has unknown connections to her mother's murder. Neither believes that the main suspect, Rose Whelan, respected local historian and sometime-aunt to Callie, is guilty of murder or witchcraft. But exonerating Rose might mean crossing paths with a dangerous force. Were the women victims of an all-too-human vengeance, or was the devil raised in Salem that night? And if they cannot discover what truly happened, will evil rise again?

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On sale Jan 24

The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney (Crown Publishing)

Description: From the debut novelist hailed as "arguably the most talented writer at work in Ireland today," (The Irish Times) comes this arresting work, which plays out against the harsh, shadowy landscape of the Irish criminal underworld. Here, Lisa McInerney quietly explores money, violence, and the unbreakable bonds of family in telling the story of one messy murder and its effects on the lives of five misfits who exist on the fringes of Ireland's post-crash society.
Ryan is a fifteen-year-old drug dealer desperate not to turn out like his alcoholic father, Tony, whose obsession with his unhinged next-door neighbor threatens to ruin him and his family. Georgie is a prostitute whose willingness to feign a religious conversion has dangerous repercussions, while Maureen, the accidental murderer, has returned to Cork after forty years in exile to discover that Jimmy, the son she was forced to give up years before, has grown into the most fearsome gangster in the city. In seeking atonement for the murder and a multitude of other perceived sins, Maureen threatens to destroy everything her son has worked so hard for, while her actions risk bringing the intertwined lives of the Irish underworld into the spotlight.
Biting, dizzying, and darkly funny, The Glorious Heresies marks the arrival of one of the most original new voices in contemporary fiction, a book whose spare, lyrical prose and expansive vision instantly establish it as a classic of Irish literature.

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587 members requesting

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On sale Aug 09

The Innkeeper of Ivy Hill by Julie Klassen (Bethany House)

Description: The lifeblood of the Wiltshire village of Ivy Hill is its coaching inn, The Bell. But when the innkeeper dies suddenly, his genteel wife, Jane Bell, becomes the reluctant owner. Jane has no notion of how to run a business. However, with the town's livelihood at stake and a large loan due, she must find a way to bring new life to the inn.

Despite their strained relationship, Jane turns to her resentful mother-in-law, Thora, for help. Formerly mistress of The Bell, Thora is struggling to find her place in the world. As she and Jane work together, they form a measure of trust, and Thora's wounded heart begins to heal. When she encounters two men from her past, she sees them—and her future—in a different light.

With pressure mounting from the bank, Jane employs innovative methods to turn the inn around, and puzzles over the intentions of several men who seem to have a vested interest in the place. Will her efforts be enough to save The Bell? And will Thora embrace the possibility of a second chance at love?

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771 members requesting

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On sale Dec 06

The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride (Crown Publishing)

Description: The captivating new novel from Eimear McBride, critically acclaimed and Baileys Women's Prize-winning author of A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing
Upon her arrival in London, an 18-year-old Irish girl begins anew as a drama student, with all the hopes of any young actress searching for the fame she's always dreamed of. She struggles to fit in—she's young and unexotic, a naive new girl—but soon she forges friendships and finds a place for herself in the big city.
Then she meets an attractive older man. He's an established actor, 20 years older, and the inevitable clamorous relationship that ensues is one that will change her forever.
A redemptive, captivating story of passion and innocence set across the bedsits of mid-1990s London, McBride holds new love under her fierce gaze, giving us all a chance to remember what it's like to fall hard for another.

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631 members requesting

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On sale Sep 20

The Tea Planter's Wife by Dinah Jefferies (Crown Publishing)

Description: In this lush, sexy, atmospheric page-turner, a young Englishwoman, 19-year-old Gwendolyn, marries a rich and seductively mysterious widower, Laurence Hooper, after a whirlwind romance in London. When she joins him at his Ceylon tea plantation, she's certain she'll be the perfect wife and, someday, mother. But life in Ceylon is not what Gwen expected. The plantation workers are resentful, the neighbors, and her new sister-in-law, treacherous. Gwen finds herself drawn to a Singhalese man of questionable intentions and worries about the propriety of her husband's connection to an American widow. But most troubling are the terrible secrets in Laurence's past that soon come to light and force Gwen to make a devastating choice. What happened to his first wife? And will the darkness of his past destroy their marriage and Gwen's chance at happiness? Set in rich and exotic 1920s Ceylon, The Tea Planter's Wife is an utterly engrossing, compulsive page-turner that climaxes with more than one heartbreaking twist.

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866 members requesting

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On sale Sep 13

The Vegetarian by Han Kang (Crown Publishing)

Description: Winner of the Man Booker International Prize, now in paperback: a beautiful, unsettling novel in three acts, about rebellion and taboo, violence and eroticism, and the twisting metamorphosis of a soul
Before the nightmares began, Yeong-hye and her husband lived an ordinary, controlled life. But the dreams—invasive images of blood and brutality—torture her, driving Yeong-hye to purge her mind and renounce eating meat altogether. It's a small act of independence, but it interrupts her marriage and sets into motion an increasingly grotesque chain of events at home. As her husband, brother-in-law, and sister each fight to reassert their control, Yeong-hye obsessively defends the choice that's become sacred to her. Soon their attempts turn desperate, subjecting first her mind, and then her body, to ever more intrusive and perverse violations, sending Yeong-hye spiraling into a dangerous, bizarre estrangement, not only from those closest to her, but also from herself.
Celebrated by critics around the world, The Vegetarian is a darkly allegorical, Kafkaesque tale of power, obsession, and one woman's struggle to break free from the violence both without and within her.

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718 members requesting

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On sale Aug 23

The Worst Breakfast by China Miéville and Zak Smith (Akashic Books)

Description: A gorgeous and hilarious picture book about the most unusual breakfast two sisters ever ate.

Two sisters sit down one morning and begin describing all of the really gross things that were in the worst breakfast they ever had, until all they can picture is a table piled sky-high with the weirdest, yuckiest, slimiest, slickest, stinkiest breakfast possible. And then they have the best breakfast ever . . . almost.

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572 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

Chevelle Data & ID Guide: 1964-1972 by Dale McIntosh (CarTech Books)

Description: Few muscle cars have ever enjoyed the long success over time as the Chevrolet Chevelle. From 1964 to 1972, more than 4 million Malibus, Chevelles, El Caminos, and Monte Carlos were produced in dozens of configurations. This creates countless questions when it's time to accurately restore a project car. With the Chevelle Data & ID Guide: 1964-1972, identifying the correct options and codes for your Chevelle becomes much, much easier.This book is a no-nonsense, hard-hitting data book that delivers all of the necessary information to correctly identify the numbers and options associated with your Chevelle. Production Numbers, VIN Decoding, Engine/Transmission/Rear Axle Codes, Interior Codes, Exterior Paint Codes, Color Combination Charts, and Full Options Lists are provided. It delivers a wealth of information in a single publication that will aid you in correctly restoring and authenticating your Chevelle. In addition, each chapter provides the information for you to determine whether or not your Chevelle is a factory SS model.With the Chevelle Data & ID Guide: 1964-1972 you have the missing tool needed to return your Chevelle project to its factory original condition.

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170 members requesting

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On sale Aug 15

Disaster Falls by Stephane Gerson (Crown Publishing)

Description: On a day like any other, on a rafting trip down Utah's Green River, Stéphane Gerson's eight-year-old son, Owen, drowned in a spot known as Disaster Falls. That same night, as darkness fell, he huddled in a tent with his wife, Alison, and their older son, Julian, trying to understand what seemed inconceivable. "It's just the three of us now," Alison said over the sounds of a light rain and, nearby, the rushing river. "We cannot do it alone. We have to stick together."

Disaster Falls chronicles the aftermath of that day and their shared determination to stay true to Alison's resolution. Gerson captures the different ways of grieving that threatened to isolate each of them in their post-Owen worlds and then, with beautiful specificity, shows how he and Alison preserved and reconfigured their marriage from within. Blending family history (including the "good death" of his father, which offers a very different perspective on mortality) and the natural history of the river, he provides an expansive, unflinching meditation on loss, our responsibilities toward our children, and the stories we tell ourselves in the wake of traumatic events.

Slowly, inexorably, Gerson writes his way back to Owen, straight to the singularity that cleaved his life into before and after, creating a portrait of grief iridescent in its fullness, and unexpectedly consoling.

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507 members requesting

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On sale Jan 24

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly (William Morrow)

Description: The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner.

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.

Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades during which they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

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753 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Homeward Bound by Peter Ames Carlin (Henry Holt and Company)

Description: A revelatory account of the life of beloved American music icon, Paul Simon, by the bestselling rock biographer Peter Ames Carlin.
To have been alive during the last sixty years is to have lived with the music of Paul Simon. The boy from Queens scored his first hit record in 1957, just months after Elvis Presley ignited the rock era. As the songwriting half of Simon & Garfunkel, his work helped define the youth movement of the '60s. On his own in the '70s, Simon made radio-dominating hits. He kicked off the '80s by reuniting with Garfunkel to perform for half a million New Yorkers in Central Park. Five years later, Simon’s album “Graceland” sold millions and spurred an international political controversy. And it doesn’t stop there.
The grandchild of Jewish immigrants from Hungary, the nearly 75-year-old singer-songwriter has not only sold more than 100 million records, won 15 Grammy awards and been installed into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame twice, but has also animated the meaning—and flexibility—of personal and cultural identity in a rapidly shrinking world.
Simon has also lived one of the most vibrant lives of modern times; a story replete with tales of Carrie Fisher, Leonard Bernstein, Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, Shelley Duvall, Nelson Mandela, the Grateful Dead, drugs, depression, marriage, divorce, and more. A life story with the scope and power of an epic novel, Carlin’s Homeward Bound is the first major biography of one of the most influential popular artists in American history.

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532 members requesting

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On sale Oct 18

In Wartime by Tim Judah (Crown Publishing)

Description: Ever since Russia shocked the world with its nearly overnight annexation of Crimea, Ukraine has been embroiled in an armed struggle. Today, pro-Russian separatists continue to combat Ukraine's newly elected coalition government. Cities fall and are recaptured, misinformation reigns, and more than two million people have been displaced.
In 1984, George Orwell wrote: "He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past." With In Wartime, Judah unpacks a century of conflict to lay bare the events and misunderstandings that have turned neighbors against one another and mired Europe's largest country in a conflict seemingly without end.
In Lviv, Ukraine's western cultural capital, mothers tend the graves of sons killed on the other side of the country. In Maidan Square, where the protests that deposed President Yanukovych began, pamphleteers, recruiters, buskers, and mascots compete for attention. In Donetsk, civilians who cheered Russian forces find their hope waning in the face of resource shortages and an unending war. Judah interviews Russian agents, weary historians, and desperate civil servants for their clashing explanations of the conflict.
Judah also takes us around the region to sites where history continues to mutate. Tourists pose for photos in the now only slightly radioactive Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. A tower that served as the headquarters of a Nazi POW camp is rebranded as a luxury hotel. And in the villages that dot Ukraine's famous farmland, retirees offer wildly different accounts of the invasions, deportations, famines, and genocides that reshaped the region in the twentieth century. Judah deftly interweaves these encounters to create a sweeping and definitive portrait of a disintegrating nation.

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340 members requesting

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On sale Oct 11

Let There Be Laughter by Michael Krasny (William Morrow)

Description: From the host of NPR affiliate’s Forum with Michael Krasny, a compendium of Jewish jokes that packs the punches with hilarious riff after riff and also offers a window into Jewish culture.

Michael Krasny has been telling Jewish jokes since his bar mitzvah, and it’s been said that he knows more of them than anyone on the planet. He certainly states his case in this wise, enlightening, and hilarious book that not only collects the best of Jewish humor passed down from generation to generation, but explains the cultural expressions and anxieties behind the laughs.

"What’s Jewish Alzheimer’s?"

"You forget everything but the grudges."

"You must be so proud. Your daughter is the President of the United States!"

"Yes. But her brother is a doctor!"

"Isn’t Jewish humor masochistic?"

"No. And if I hear that one more time I am going to kill myself."

With his background as a scholar and public-radio host, Krasny delves deeply into the themes, topics, and form of Jewish humor: chauvinism undercut by irony and self-mockery, the fear of losing cultural identity through assimilation, the importance of vocal inflection in joke-telling, and calls to communal memory, including the use of Yiddish.

Borrowing from traditional humor and such Jewish comedy legends as Jackie Mason, Mel Brooks, and Joan Rivers, Larry David, Sarah Silverman, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, Let There Be Laughter is an absolute pleasure for the chosen and goyim alike.

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384 members requesting

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On sale Sep 27

Life as Jamie Knows It: An Exceptional Child Grows Up by Michael Berube (Beacon Press)

Description: The story of Jamie Bérubé’s journey to adulthood and a meditation on disability in American life

Published in 1996, Life as We Know It introduced Jamie Bérubé to the world as a sweet, bright, gregarious little boy who loves the Beatles, pizza, and making lists. At four, he is like many young people his age, but his Down syndrome leads most people to see him only in terms of his disability.

Twenty years later, Jamie is no longer little, though he still loves the Beatles, pizza, and making lists. In Life as Jamie Knows It, Michael Bérubé chronicles his son’s growth and his growing love of the world, writing as both a disability studies scholar and as a father. He follows Jamie through the transitions within his family and home life, through his school years, through the complicated process of entering the workforce with a disability. In a book that joins stirring memoir and sharp philosophical inquiry, Bérubé guides us through the labyrinth of ethical issues surrounding how we approach disability and uses Jamie’s story to argue for a deeper understanding of disability that challenges us to move toward a more just, more inclusive society.

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294 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

Rogue Heroes by Ben Macintyre (Crown Publishing)

Description: Ben Macintyre's latest book of derring-do and wartime intrigue reveals the incredible story of the last truly unsung secret organization of World War II—Britain's Special Air Service, or the SAS. Facing long odds and a tough slog against Rommel and the Germans' tanks in the Middle East theater, Britain turned to the brainchild of one its most unlikely heroes: David Stirling, a young man whose aimlessness and almost practiced ennui belied a remarkable mind for strategy. With the help of his equally idiosyncratic colleague, the rough-and-tumble Jock Lewes, Stirling sought to assemble a crack team of highly trained men who would parachute in behind enemy lines to sabotage the German war machine. Though he faced stiff resistance from those who believed such activities violated the rules of war, Stirling persevered and in the process created a legacy. Staffed by brilliant and sometimes brutal men, whose talents defied both tradition and expectations, the SAS would change not only the course of the war, but the very nature of combat itself.
Written with complete access to the never-before-seen SAS archives (the organization chose Macintyre to be their official historian), Savage Heroes offers a powerfully intimate look at life on the battlefield as lived by a group of remarkable soldiers whose contributions have, until now, gone unrecognized beyond the classified world. Filled with wrenching set pieces and weaving its way through multiple theaters of our grandest and most terrible war, this book is both an excellent addition to the Macintyre library and critical piece in our understanding of the war's unfolding.

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507 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

Same Family, Different Colors: Confronting Colorism in America's Diverse Families by Lori Tharps (Beacon Press)

Description: Weaving together personal stories, history, and analysis, Same Family, Different Colors explores the myriad ways skin-color politics affect family dynamics in the United States.

Colorism and color bias—the preference for or presumed superiority of people based on the lighter color of their skin—is a pervasive but rarely openly discussed phenomenon, one that is centuries old and continues today. In Same Family, Different Colors, journalist Lori Tharps, the mother of three mixed-race children with three distinct skin colors, uses her own family as a starting point to explore how skin-color difference is dealt with in African American, Latino, Asian American, and mixed-race families and communities. Along with intimate and revealing stories and anecdotes from dozens of diverse people from across the United States, Tharps adds a historical overview and a contemporary cultural critique. Same Family, Different Colors is a solution-seeking journey to the heart of identity politics, so this more subtle “cousin to racism,” in the author’s words, will be acknowledged, understood, and debated.

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328 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom by John Pomfret (Henry Holt and Company)

Description: A narrative account of the relationship between the U.S. and China from the Revolutionary War to the present day.
Our relationship with China remains one of the most complex and rapidly evolving, and is perhaps one of the most important to our nation's future. In The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom, John Pomfret, the author of the bestselling Chinese Lessons, takes us deep into these two countries' shared history, and illuminates in vibrant, stunning detail every major event, relationship, and ongoing development that has affected diplomacy between these two booming, influential nations. We meet early American missionaries and chart their influence in China, and follow a group of young Chinese students who enroll in American universities, eager to soak up Western traditions. We witness firsthand major and devastating events like the Boxer Rebellion, and the rise of Mao. We examine both nations' involvement in world events, such as World War I and II. Pomfret takes the myriad historical milestones of two of the world's most powerful nations and turns them into one fluid, fascinating story, leaving us with a nuanced understanding of where these two nations stand in relation to one another, and the rest of the world.

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295 members requesting

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On sale Nov 29

The Clancys of Queens by Tara Clancy (Crown Publishing)

Description: Fifth-generation New Yorker, third-generation bartender, and first-time author Tara Clancy was raised in three wildly divergent homes: a converted boat shed in working-class Queens, a geriatric commune of feisty, Brooklyn-born Italians, and a sprawling Hamptons estate she visited every other weekend. This childhood triptych comes to life in The Clancys of Queens, an electric, one-of-a-kind memoir.
From scheming and gambling with her force-of-nature grandmother, to brawling with eleven-year-old girls on the concrete recess battle yard of MS 172, to hours lounging on Adirondack chairs beside an immaculate croquet lawn, to holding court beside Joey O'Dirt, Goiter Eddy, and Roger the Dodger at her dad's local bar, Tara leapfrogs across these varied spheres, delivering stories from each world with originality, grit, and outrageous humor.
But The Clancys of Queens is not merely an authentic coming-of-age tale or a rowdy barstool biography. Chock-full of characters who escape the popular imaginings of this city, the book offers a bold portrait of real people, people whose stories are largely absent from our shelves. Most crucially, it captures—in inimitable prose—the rarely heard voices of New York's working-class women.
With a light touch but a hard hit, The Clancys of Queens blends savvy and wit to take us on an unforgettable strata-hopping adventure.

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533 members requesting

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On sale Oct 11

The Power of Meaning by Emily Esfahani Smith (Crown Publishing)

Description: Americans have a lot to be happy about. Entertainment is always at the tip of our fingers. Companies tempt employees with junk food and video games. We have apps that enable us to order pizza or have our laundry picked up with the tap of a button. In short, our culture is obsessed with the good life. Yet, we're more dissatisfied than ever. In The Power of Meaning, Emily Esfahani Smith argues that we've been chasing the wrong thing. It's not happiness that makes life worth living—it's meaning. Drawing on the latest cognitive science research, as well as insights from literature and philosophy, and her own prodigious reporting, Smith shows that by developing a "meaning mind-set," we can all achieve a deeper satisfaction.
With a warm, assured voice that moves effortlessly from George Eliot and Aristotle to Monty Python and Louis C.K., Smith spells out the four pillars of the meaning mind-set: cultivating connections to others, working toward our life's purpose, telling stories about our place in the world, and finding transcendence. Along the way, she visits a tight-knit fishing village in Tangier to investigate belonging, experiences awe while stargazing in West Texas, and attends a dinner where twentysomethings have gathered to share their experiences of profound loss. She introduces us to compelling seekers of meaning: the drug kingpin who found his purpose in helping people get fit; the artist who draws on her Hindu upbringing to create arresting and inspiring photographs; and a "winterkeeper" at Yellowstone who finds a sense of belonging even in isolation. And she shows us how we can lean on the pillars in difficult times, and how we might begin to build a culture of meaning in our families, our workplaces, and our communities.
Stirring, inspiring, and story-driven, The Power of Meaning will strike a profound chord in anyone seeking more in life.

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519 members requesting

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On sale Jan 10

Weapons of Math Destruction by Cathy O'Neil (Crown Publishing)

Description: We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated. But as Cathy O'Neil reveals in this shocking book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they're wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can't get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his race or neighborhood), he's then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a "toxic cocktail for democracy." Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.

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476 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Inferno by Julian Stockwin (McBooks Press)

Description: Napoleon Bonaparte’s ambition for world domination has grown. Captain Sir Thomas Kydd resumes command of his ship Tyger and finds himself part of a great armada on a mission of utmost urgency: Britain has sent a sea force to the entrance to the Baltic to pressure Denmark's Crown Prince to turn over his fleet before it falls into French hands.

Unbeknownst to Kydd, his old friend, Renzi, is on a parallel diplomatic mission. Then—while attempting Renzi’s rescue—Kydd witnesses an amazing sight: the entire Danish fleet leaving Copenhagen harbor, single file.

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314 members requesting

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On sale Oct 01

Celtic Tales by Kate Forrester (Chronicle Books)

Description: The traditional stories of Ireland, Scotland, Brittany, and Wales transport us to the fantastical world of Celtic folklore. Translated and transcribed by folklorists in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the 16 stories in this compilation conjure forgotten realms and rare magical creatures in vivid prose. These timeless tales brim with wit and magic, and each one is brought to life with elegant silhouette art by Kate Forrester in this special illustrated edition.

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1284 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 30

Counting with Barefoot Critters by Teagan White (Tundra Books)

Description: Recommended for ages 4 to 8.

What is a day of counting with Barefoot Critters?
Making pancakes
Helping friends
Exploring Swimming
Playing pirates
Learning about numbers!
Join this adorable cast of animal characters as they explore numbers and counting over the course of a day, having fun at all stops along the way.

TEAGAN WHITE is a freelance illustrator based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her work encompasses intricate drawings of flora and fauna, playful watercolors of animal critters, illustrated typography and everything in between. This is her second book featuring the Barefoot Critters—Adventures with Barefoot Critters was her first picture book.

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720 members requesting

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On sale Aug 09

Cruel Beautiful World by Caroline Leavitt (Algonquin Books)

Description: Caroline Levitt is at her mesmerizing best in this haunting, nuanced portrait of love, sisters, and the impossible legacy of family.

It’s 1969, and sixteen-year-old Lucy is about to run away to live off the grid in rural Pennsylvania, a rash act that will have vicious repercussions for both her and her older sister, Charlotte. As Lucy’s default caretaker for most of their lives, Charlotte’s youth has been marked by the burden of responsibility, but never more so than when Lucy’s dream of a rural paradise turns into a nightmare.

Cruel Beautiful World examines the intricate, infinitesimal distance between seduction and love, loyalty and duty, and explores what happens when you’re responsible for things you cannot fix.

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536 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

Downside Up by Richard Scrimger (Tundra Books)

Description: Recommended for ages 10 and up.

Fred is a sixth-grader reeling from the loss of his beloved dog, Casey. Every day he walks home from school bouncing Casey's old worn-out tennis ball. One day, the ball falls down a sewer grate, and Fred can't bear to leave it down there. He pries open the grate and stumbles down. Through the sewer, Fred enters a parallel universe: Casey is alive, his mom and sister are happier, and there's a version of Fred who's happier too. Spending time with Casey, Fred feels joy for the first time since his dog's death, but he slowly realizes that the loss of Casey is masking an even greater loss: the death of Fred's father. Fred brings his sister, Izzy, to this upside-down world of lost things in the hope of finding their father and bringing him back. Can everything that is lost be found again?

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15 review copies available
487 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Sep 13

I Could Pee On This, Too by Francesco Marciuliano (Chronicle Books)

Description: There's a new cat in town! This feisty sibling of the international bestseller I Could Pee on This will be making its own sensational mark in the cat-poetry world. I Could Pee on This, Too explores fresh feline emotions and philosophical musings through cats' own poetry, such as "Welcome New Cat," "Sleeping My Life Away," and "You Also Live Here." Any cat lover who's longed for a deeper look into the enigmatic world of their cats will fall whiskers over paws for this well-versed follow-up.

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657 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 16

Inheriting Edith by Zoe Fishman (William Morrow)

Description: From the author of Driving Lessons, Saving Ruth, and Balancing Acts comes a poignant breakout novel about a single mother who inherits a beautiful beach house with a caveat—she must take care of the ornery elderly woman who lives in it.

Maggie Sheets is just trying to get by. A single mother, she works as a house cleaner and dreams of the days when her financial woes will be over. When her former employer, Liza, a renowned author Maggie once considered a friend, takes her own life, Maggie learns that she has been included in the will and now owns a beautiful home in Sag Harbor. But there’s a catch: Maggie’s also inherited Liza’s eighty-two year old mother.

Edith has always prided herself on her independence, but a recent Alzheimer’s diagnosis has her wary about the future. She’s left on her own to pick up the pieces of her daughter’s death until Maggie, with her toddler in tow, arrives at her house, guarded but determined to make their unlikely situation work. Edith is angry and uninterested, until she suffers a fall and must rely on Maggie. Together they begin to heal the hurt left in Liza’s wake, and when Maggie offers to transcribe Edith’s life for her to help hold onto the moments she’s terrified of losing, a tentative alliance forms.

As Maggie helps Edith resolve the aftermath of a long-held secret—and confronts both the roots and repercussions of one of her own—each woman embarks on a path to forgiveness, acceptance, and a life-changing friendship.

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15 review copies available
739 members requesting

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On sale Nov 01

Mercy First And Last by Katie Hanrahan (Newcastlewest Books)

Description: The youngest daughter of a prominent radical politician, Sarah Curran comes of age in an era of rebellion and revolution, buffeted by tragedy and scandal. She has long known Robert Emmet, but not until she is caught up in the fevered calls for Irish independence does she fall in love with the budding revolutionary leader. Her father forbids their union, but a child raised in a climate of insurrection veers towards her own small rebellion. Determined to win her father's acclaim, she strives to raise his fortunes through marriage to Ireland's future ruler, certain that the uprising cannot fail—-even as Emmet's plans fall apart with deadly consequences.

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295 members requesting

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On sale Sep 20

Once, in a Town Called Moth by Trilby Kent (Tundra Books)

Description: Recommended for ages 12 and up.

Anneli has lived in a small Mennonite community in Bolivia her whole life—until now. She and her father have packed their bags, changed their names and fled, and she doesn’t know why. She only knows that her father is trying to locate her mother, who disappeared when Anneli was five.

Arriving in Toronto, Anneli has to fend for herself in an alien environment, isolated in a big city with no idea how to navigate the unspoken codes that come with being fourteen and in high school. Torn between two worlds, she is troubled by the things she and her father have left behind—a vanished town, a long-ago crime—but determined to find her mother: the one person who might be able to tell her just what it is they’re running from.

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519 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Realm of Darkness by C.F. Dunn (Lion Fiction)

Description: Enter to win 1 of 15 copies of "Realm of Darkness."

Emma and Matthew are finally free to marry, but Matthew's secret continues to haunt them.

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372 members requesting

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On sale Jul 27

San Juan Noir by Mayra Santos-Febres (Akashic Books)

Description: Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies, launched in 2004 with Brooklyn Noir. Each story is set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book.

The Noir Series has made a strong mark in the Caribbean with Havana Noir, Kingston Noir, Haiti Noir, and Trinidad Noir. This volume showcases the fact that the island of Puerto Rico is not all sandy beaches and extravagant hotels. Mayra Santos-Febres is one of the island's literary titans, and she has recruited a stellar list of compatriots to contribute.

Brand-new stories by: Wilfredo J. Burgos Matos, Ernesto Quiñonez, Mayra Santos-Febres, José Rabelo, Luis Negrón, Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro, Ana María Fuster Lavin, Janette Becerra, Manolo Nuñez Negron, Tere Dávila, Edmaris Carazo, Alejandro Álvarez Nieves, Charlie Vázquez, and Manuel Meléndez.

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271 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

The Girl in the Castle by Santa Montefiore (William Morrow)

Description: International sensation Santa Montefiore presents the first book in a trilogy that follows three Irish women through the decades of the twentieth century—perfect for fans of Kate Morton and Hazel Gaynor.

Born on the ninth day of the ninth month in the year 1900, Kitty Deverill is special as her grandmother has always told her. Built on the stunning green hills of West Cork, Ireland, Castle Deverill is Kitty’s beloved home, where many generations of Deverills have also resided. Although she’s Anglo-Irish, Kitty’s heart completely belongs to the wild countryside of the Emerald Isle, and her devotion to her Irish-Catholic friends Bridie Doyle, the daughter of the castle’s cook, and Jack O’Leary, the vet’s son, is unmatched—even if Jack is always reminding her that she isn’t fully Irish. Still, Jack and Kitty can’t help falling in love although they both know their union faces the greatest obstacles since they are from different worlds.

Bridie cherishes her friendship with Kitty, who makes her feel more like her equal than a servant. Yet she can’t help dreaming of someday having all the wealth and glamour Kitty’s station in life affords her. But when she discovers a secret that Kitty has been keeping from her, Bridie finds herself growing resentful toward the girl in the castle who seems to have it all.

When the Irish revolt to throw over British rule in Southern Ireland, Jack enlists to fight. Worried for her safety, Jack warns Kitty to keep her distance, but she refuses and throws herself into the cause for Irish liberty, running messages and ammunition between the rebels. But as Kitty soon discovers, her allegiance to her family and her friends will be tested—and when Castle Deverill comes under attack, the only home and life she’s ever known are threatened.

A powerful story of love, loyalty, and friendship, The Girl in the Castle is an exquisitely written novel set against the magical, captivating landscape of Ireland.

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15 review copies available
715 members requesting

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On sale Sep 27

The Peculiar Miracles of Antoinette Martin by Stephanie Knipper (Algonquin Books)

Description: Sisters Rose and Lily Martin were inseparable when they were kids. As adults, they’ve been estranged for years, until circumstances force them to come together to protect Rose’s daughter. Ten-year-old Antoinette has a severe form of autism that requires constant care and attention. She has never spoken a word, but she has a powerful gift that others would give anything to harness: she can heal things with her touch. She brings wilted flowers back to life, makes a neighbor’s tremors disappear, changes the normal course of nature on the Kentucky flower farm where she and her mother live.

Antoinette’s gift, though, puts her own life in danger, as each healing comes with an increasingly deadly price. As Rose—the center of her daughter’s life—struggles with her own failing health, and Lily confronts her anguished past, they, and the men who love them, come to realize the sacrifices that must be made to keep this very special child safe.

Written with great heart and a deep understanding of what it feels like to be “different,” The Peculiar Miracles of Antoinette Martin is a novel about what it means to be family, and about the lengths to which people will go to protect the ones they love.

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15 review copies available
606 members requesting

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On sale Aug 02

Yitzi and the Giant Menorah by Richard Ungar (Tundra Books)

Description: Recommended for ages 5 to 9.

On the eve of Hanukkah, the People of Chelm have received a special gift from the Mayor of Lublin. A giant menorah in which they place in the square for all the admire. Every night, the villagers meet to watch the lighting of a candle on the menorah. And every night, the villagers ponder What is the most fitting way to thank the Mayor of Lublin?

The villagers come up with idea after idea, but their gift never quite reaches the Mayor. What will they do? Finally, on the last night of Hanukkah, Yitzi has an idea to orchestrate the surprise thank you gift.

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15 review copies available
336 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

10 Performance-Based Projects for the Language Arts Classroom (Grades 3–5) by Todd Stanley (Prufrock Press)

Description: Each book in the 10 Performance-Based Projects series provides 10 ready-made projects designed to help students achieve higher levels of thinking and develop 21st-century skills. Projects are aligned to the Common Core State Standards, allowing students to explore and be creative as well as gain enduring understanding. Each project represents a type of performance assessment, including portfolios, oral presentations, research papers, and exhibitions. Included for each project is a suggested calendar to allow teacher scheduling, mini-lessons that allow students to build capacity and gain understanding, as well as multiple rubrics to objectively assess student performance. The lessons are presented in an easy-to-follow format, enabling teachers to implement projects immediately.

Grades 3–5

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15 review copies available
227 members requesting

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On sale Sep 01

10 Performance-Based Projects for the Math Classroom (Grades 3–5) by Todd Stanley (Prufrock Press)

Description: Each book in the 10 Performance-Based Projects series provides 10 ready-made projects designed to help students achieve higher levels of thinking and develop 21st-century skills. Projects are aligned to the Common Core State Standards, allowing students to explore and be creative as well as gain enduring understanding. Each project represents a type of performance assessment, including portfolios, oral presentations, research papers, and exhibitions. Included for each project is a suggested calendar to allow teacher scheduling, mini-lessons that allow students to build capacity and gain understanding, as well as multiple rubrics to objectively assess student performance. The lessons are presented in an easy-to-follow format, enabling teachers to implement projects immediately.

Grades 3–5

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15 review copies available
224 members requesting

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On sale Sep 15

Black Earth by Timothy Snyder (Crown Publishing)

Description: In this epic, haunting, deeply researched, and profoundly original book, Timothy Snyder has written a history of extermination and survival, an explanation of an unprecedented crime of the twentieth century that might serve as a precedent in the twenty-first. It tells the story of the Holocaust based on an array of new archival sources from eastern Europe and the voices of Jewish survivors to present the mass murder of the Jews in comprehensible historical terms—and thus all the more terrifyingly.
The Holocaust began in a dark but accessible place, in Hitler's mind, with the thought that the elimination of Jews would restore balance to the planet and allow Germans to win the natural resources they deserved. Hitler's worldview could be realized only insofar as Germans destroyed other states, and Hitler's political agenda was to prepare for this new kind of war. In the wake of Hitler's destruction, and in the zones of statelessness where almost all Jews died, they were rescued sometimes by institutions that resembled states, like partisan armies and churches, and sometimes by those who could grant them a semblance of citizenship, the heroic diplomats. A very few people, the righteous few, aided Jews without any connection to an institution and without any selfish motive. Much of the new archival research in this book is devoted to understanding these people. They are exemplary, but in similar circumstances few of us would follow their example.
If the Holocaust was in fact a result of ecological panic and state destruction, Snyder argues persuasively that we have drawn the wrong lessons from it and endangered our own future. The world of the early twenty-first century is coming to resemble that of the early twentieth, in the growing preoccupations with food and water and in the destabilization of a previous world order. Our world is much closer to Hitler's than we might imagine. Saving our society requires that we see the Holocaust as it was and ourselves as we are. In this chilling, groundbreaking, and utterly absorbing narrative, Black Earth shows that the Holocaust is not only history but warning.

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15 review copies available
496 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Coppola’s Monster Film by Steven Travers (McFarland)

Description: In 1975, after his two Godfather epics, Francis Ford Coppola went to the Philippines to film Apocalypse Now. He scrapped much of the original script, a jingoistic narrative of U.S. Special Forces winning an unwinnable war. Harvey Keitel, originally cast in the lead role, was fired and replaced by Martin Sheen, who had a heart attack. An overweight Marlon Brando, paid a huge salary, did more philosophizing than acting. It rained almost every day and a hurricane wiped out the set. The Philippine government promised the use of helicopters but diverted them at the last minute to fight communist and Muslim separatists.
Coppola filmed for four years with no ending in the script. The shoot threatened to be the biggest disaster in movie history. Providing a detailed snapshot of American cinema during the Vietnam War, this book tells the story of how Apocalypse Now became one of the great films of all time.

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15 review copies available
292 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

Creativity and Innovation: Theory, Research, and Practice by Jonathan Plucker (Prufrock Press)

Description: Creativity and innovation are frequently mentioned as key 21st-century skills for career and life success. Indeed, recent research provides evidence that the jobs of the future will increasingly require the ability to bring creative solutions to complex problems. And creativity is often the spice of life, that little extra something that makes the mundane into the interesting, making our routines into fresh new approaches to our daily lives. Over the past quarter century, our understanding of creativity has advanced significantly—we know more about what it is (and isn’t), we better understand how to foster it, and we have deeper, more complex knowledge about how it relates to intelligence, leadership, personality, and other constructs. This book brings together some of the world’s best thinkers and researchers on creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship to provide a comprehensive but highly readable overview of these exciting, important topics.

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15 review copies available
281 members requesting

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On sale Sep 01

Down from the Attic by John Soister (McFarland)

Description: Much has been written (and rewritten) about classic horror and science fiction films like Nosferatu and Metropolis, as well as not-so-classic pictures like Bride of the Monster and The Hideous Sun Demon. Yet some genre films have fallen through the cracks. The 24 films—some elusive, some easily found on YouTube—examined in this book all suffered critical  neglect and were prematurely stacked in the attic. The authors bring them back into the light, beginning with Der Tunnel (1915), about the building of a transatlantic tunnel, and ending with The Emperor’s Baker—The Baker’s Emperor (1951), a bizarre Marxist take on the Golem legend.
   A variety of thrillers are covered—Fog (1933), Return of the Terror (1934), Forgotten Faces (1928)—along with such sci-fi leaps into the future as The Sky Ranger (1921), High Treason (1929) and Just Imagine (1930). Early adaptations include The Man Who Laughs (1921), The Monkey’s Paw (1923), Hound of the Baskervilles (1937) and Sweeney Todd (1928). Rare stills and background material are included in a discussion of Hispanic vintage horror. The career of exploitation auteur, Bud Pollard (The Horror, 1933) is examined.

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15 review copies available
342 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

Entanglement: The Secret Lives of Hair by Emma Tarlo (Oneworld Publications)

Description: When no longer attached to the head, human hair is disconcerting. Whether it’s being harvested in Indian temples, crafted into wigs in China or sold as extensions in the United States, hair is part of a hidden but expanding global trade most of us know nothing about. A commodity entangled in religion, politics and cultural identity, it finds second lives in wigs, toupees, rope, embroidery, paintbrushes, fertiliser and proteins. But what happens when different hair worlds collide?

Entanglement is a fascinating look at the intimate stories that connect the lives of people with different aspirations and needs in distant parts of the world. Anthropologist Emma Tarlo unveils the secret global journeys of hair as she traces its paths through India, Myanmar, Africa, the United States and Europe and investigates the wide range of meanings hair has for us. A fascinating look inside a little-known industry, this book ensures you will never look at hair in quite the same way again.

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15 review copies available
357 members requesting

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On sale Nov 08

Gunpowder Girls: Three Civil War Tragedies by Tanya Anderson (Quindaro Press)

Description: "Outstanding … thoroughly researched and beautifully written." — James McPherson, author, Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

A Junior Library Guild Selection.

With thousands of men off fighting in the Civil War, the government hired women and girls—some as young as ten—to make millions of rounds of ammunition. Poor immigrant girls and widows paid the price for carelessness at three major arsenals. Many of these workers were killed, blown up and burned beyond recognition.

Tanya Anderson tells an amazing war story that finally gives its subjects their due. Gunpowder Girls is a story of child labor and immigrant hopes and the cruel, endless demands of an all-consuming war.

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15 review copies available
475 members requesting

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On sale Oct 11

Harness the Sun: America's Quest for a Solar-Powered Future by Philip Warburg (Beacon Press)

Description: Going from the inner city to the open desert, a seasoned environmental advocate looks at solar energy’s remarkable ascent and its promise for America’s future

Solar power was once the domain of futurists and environmentally minded suburbanites. Today it is part of mainstream America. Scan the skyline of downtown neighborhoods, check out the rooftop of the nearest Walmart, and take a close look at your local sports arena. Chances are you’ll find solar panels in those and many other unexpected places.

In Harness the Sun, Philip Warburg takes readers on a far-flung journey that explores America’s solar revolution. Beginning with his solar-powered home in New England, he introduces readers to the pioneers who are spearheading our move toward a clean energy economy. We meet the CEOs who are propelling solar power to prominence and the intrepid construction workers who scale our rooftops installing panels. We encounter the engineers who are building giant utility-scale projects in prime solar states like Nevada, Arizona, and California, and the biologists who make sure wildlife is protected at those sites.

Warburg shows how solar energy has won surprising support across the political spectrum. Prominent conservatives embrace solar power as an emblem of market freedom, while environmental advocates see it as a way to reduce America’s greenhouse gas emissions. At the same time, economic-justice activists celebrate solar’s potential to lift up low-income communities, and Native American leaders welcome the income and jobs that the industry will bring to their communities.

Yet solar energy has its downsides and detractors too. Conservationists worry about the impact of large solar farms on protected animal species, and some local citizens groups resent the encroachment of solar projects on farmland and open spaces. Warburg gives voice to those at the epicenter of these conflicts and points the way to constructive solutions.

Harness the Sun offers a grounded, persuasive vision of America’s energy future. It is a future fueled by clean, renewable sources of power, with solar at center stage.

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15 review copies available
213 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Household Workers Unite: The Untold Story of African American Women Who Built a Movement by Premilla Nadasen (Beacon Press)

Description: Telling the stories of African American domestic workers, this book resurrects a little-known history of domestic worker activism in the 1960s and 1970s, offering new perspectives on race, labor, feminism, and organizing.

In this groundbreaking history of African American domestic-worker organizing, scholar and activist Premilla Nadasen shatters countless myths and misconceptions about an historically misunderstood workforce. Resurrecting a little-known history of domestic-worker activism from the 1950s to the 1970s, Nadasen shows how these women were a far cry from the stereotyped passive and powerless victims; they were innovative labor organizers who tirelessly organized on buses and streets across the United States to bring dignity and legal recognition to their occupation.

Dismissed by mainstream labor as “unorganizable,” African American household workers developed unique strategies for social change and formed unprecedented alliances with activists in both the women’s rights and the black freedom movements. Using storytelling as a form of activism and as means of establishing a collective identity as workers, these women proudly declared, “We refuse to be your mammies, nannies, aunties, uncles, girls, handmaidens any longer.”

With compelling personal stories of the leaders and participants on the front lines, Household Workers Unite gives voice to the poor women of color whose dedicated struggle for higher wages, better working conditions, and respect on the job created a sustained political movement that endures today.

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15 review copies available
275 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Klaus Kinski, Beast of Cinema by Matthew Edwards (McFarland)

Description: With more than 130 films and a career spanning four decades, Klaus Kinski (1926–1991) was one of the most controversial actors of his generation. Known for his wild tantrums on set and his legendary collaborations with auteur Werner Herzog—Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972), Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)—Kinski’s intense performances made him the darling of European arthouse and exploitation/horror cinema. A genius in front of the camera, he was capable of lighting up the most risible films. Yet behind his public persona lurked a depraved man who took his art to the darkest extremes.
This first ever collection of essays focusing on Kinski examines his work in exploitation and art house films and spaghetti westerns, along with his performances in such cult classics as Doctor Zhivago (1965), Crawlspace (1986), Venus in Furs (1965), The Great Silence (1968), Android (1982) and his only directorial credit, Paganini (1989). More than 50 reviews of Kinski’s films are included, along with exclusive interviews with filmmakers and actors who worked with him.

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15 review copies available
203 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

Library of Luminaries: Coco Chanel by Zena Alkayat (Chronicle Books)

Description: Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel's signature style and revolutionary approach to design changed women's fashion forever. Featuring handwritten text paired with sweet illustrations and a tactile cover with foil-stamped and debossed details, this giftable volume sheds new light on the woman behind some of the last century's most iconic designs—from her impoverished childhood in an orphanage to her dreams of becoming a singer and her tumultuous love affairs with Europe's elite. Brimming with excerpts from Chanel's own letters and diaries, these pages reveal the passion and vision of one of the most celebrated fashion designers of all time.

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15 review copies available
522 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 16

Library of Luminaries: Frida Kahlo by Zena Alkayat (Chronicle Books)

Description: Step into the world of one of history's most celebrated artists and feminist icons: Frida Kahlo. This beautifully illustrated biography is full of colorful details that illuminate the woman behind the artwork, including excerpts from Kahlo's personal letters and diaries on her childhood dreams of becoming a doctor, the accident that changed the course of her life, and her love affairs with famous artists. Featuring handwritten text alongside lovely illustrations in a charming case with foil stamping and debossed details, Library of Luminaries: Frida Kahlo provides a captivating window into the vibrant life, work, and creative vision of the beloved Mexican artist.

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15 review copies available
551 members requesting

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On sale Aug 16

Meet Me at the Bamboo Table by A.V. Crofts (Chin Music Press)

Description: "Meet Me at the Bamboo Table is a thought-provoking book that challenges you to think about what's on your dinner table in a whole new light." — Simon Majumdar, author of Fed, White, and Blue: Finding America with My Fork, and Judge on Food Network’s Cutthroat Kitchen.

In our ever-more-globalized world, how better to connect than with food, and who better to connect us than a chowhound communications professor? Crofts concocts a multimedia feast of photos, “sketchnotes,” and vignettes, inviting us to everything from Thanksgiving in Germany to a Lunar New Year dumpling party in Seattle. The result is a beautiful meditation on how food nourishes community.

A.V. Crofts is a senior lecturer in the Department of Communications and a clinical instructor in the Department of Global Health at the University of Washington. Her work has been published in Gastronomica and Saveur.

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15 review copies available
262 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Objective Troy by Scott Shane (Crown Publishing)

Description: Objective Troy tells the engaging and unsettling story of Anwar al-Awlaki, the once-celebrated American imam who called for moderation after 9/11, a man who ultimately directed his outsized talents to the mass murder of his fellow citizens. It follows Barack Obama's campaign against the excesses of the Bush counterterrorism programs and his eventual embrace of the targeted killing of suspected militants. And it recounts how the president directed the mammoth machinery of spy agencies to hunt Awlaki down in a frantic, multimillion-dollar pursuit that would end with the death of Awlaki by a bizarre, robotic technology that is changing warfare—the drone.
Scott Shane, who has covered terrorism for the New York Times over the last decade, weaves the clash between president and terrorist into both a riveting narrative and a deeply human account of the defining conflict of our era. Awlaki, who directed a plot that almost derailed Obama's presidency and then taunted him from his desert hideouts, will go down in history as the first United States citizen deliberately hunted and assassinated by his own government without trial. But his eloquent calls to jihad, amplified by YouTube, continue to lure young Westerners into terrorism—resulting in tragedies from the Boston Marathon bombing to the murder of cartoonists at a Paris weekly. Awlaki's life and death show how profoundly America has been changed by the threat of terrorism and by our own fears.
Illuminating and provocative, and based on years of in-depth reporting, Objective Troy is a brilliant reckoning with the moral challenge of terrorism and a masterful chronicle of our times.

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15 review copies available
217 members requesting

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On sale Sep 13

Our Grandchildren Redesigned: Life in the Bioengineered Society of the Near Future by Michael Bess (Beacon Press)

Description: A panoramic overview of biotechnologies that can endlessly boost human capabilities and the drastic changes these “superhuman” traits could trigger

Biotechnology is moving fast. In the coming decades, advanced pharmaceuticals, bioelectronics, and genetic interventions will be used not only to heal the sick but to boost human physical and mental performance to unprecedented levels. People will have access to pills that make them stronger and faster, informatic devices will interface seamlessly with the human brain, and epigenetic modification may allow people to reshape their own physical and mental identities at will.

In this important and timely book, prize-winning historian Michael Bess provides a clear, nontechnical overview of cutting-edge biotechnology and paints a vivid portrait of a near-future society in which bioenhancement has become a part of everyday life. He surveys the ethical questions raised by the enhancement enterprise and explores the space for human agency in dealing with the challenges that these technologies will present.

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15 review copies available
211 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Outlander’s Sassenachs by Valerie Frankel (McFarland)

Description: A time travel epic featuring history and romance, Outlander—unlike most adventure series—is aimed at women audiences. The kilted male characters, the female narrator, the fantastic period costumes are atypical of male-gendered television. Both the show and the novels on which it is based address issues most series shy away from, like breast feeding, abortion and birth control. Role reversals are common—the powerful Claire rescues her virginal husband Jamie from sexual abuse. When the villainous Black Jack Randall displays his genitals to the heroine Jenny, she laughs.
This collection of new essays examines Outlander as an exploration of what it means to be a capable 18th century woman and what it means in the modern world. As Claire explores different models of strength in both periods, Jamie comes to understand the nuances of male honor, power and alternative sexuality through the contrasting figures of Black Jack and Lord John. As the heroes negotiate the complications of marriage and life, they make discoveries about gender that resonate with modern audiences.

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15 review copies available
386 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Jun 01

Paths to Happiness by Edward Hoffman (Chronicle Books)

Description: From positive psychology expert Edward Hoffman, Ph.D., Paths to Happiness guides readers through 50 fun, stimulating, mind-opening ways to achieve greater joy and feel more fulfilled. From dabbling in watercolors to expressing gratitude, embracing nostalgia to power napping, each suggestion in these pages has been shown by scientific research to increase happiness and support well-being. Every topic is explored in a digestible manner and invites readers to reflect on their lives, with easy ways to cultivate a happier mindset. The easy dip-in, dip-out style and engaging activities make this accessible guide to finding happiness in daily living one that people will want to revisit again and again.

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15 review copies available
473 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 16

Settle and Conquer by Matthew Flynn (McFarland)

Description: This rereading of the history of American westward expansion examines the destruction of Native American cultures as a successful campaign of “counterinsurgency.” Paramilitary figures such as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett “opened the West” and frontiersmen infiltrated the enemy, learning Indian tactics and launching “search and destroy” missions. Conventional military force was a key component but the interchange between militia, regular soldiers, volunteers and frontiersmen underscores the complexity of the conflict and the implementing of a “peace policy.” The campaign’s outcome rested as much on the civilian population’s economic imperatives as any military action. The success of this three-century war of attrition was unparalleled but ultimately saw the victors question the morality of their own actions.

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15 review copies available
280 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

Shots on the Bridge: Police Violence and Cover-up in the Wake of Katrina by Ronnie Greene (Beacon Press)

Description: Named one of the top books of 2015 by NewsOne Now, and named one of the best books of August 2015 by Apple

Winner of the 2015 Investigative Reporters and Editors Book Award

A harrowing story of blue on black violence, of black lives that seemingly did not matter.


On September 4, 2005, six days after Hurricane Katrina’s landfall in New Orleans, two groups of people intersected on the Danziger Bridge, a low-rising expanse over the Industrial Canal. One was the police who had stayed behind as Katrina roared near, desperate to maintain control as their city spun into chaos. The other was the residents forced to stay behind with them during the storm and, on that fateful Sunday, searching for the basics of survival: food, medicine, security. They collided that morning in a frenzy of gunfire.

When the shooting stopped, a gentle forty-year-old man with the mind of a child lay slumped on the ground, seven bullet wounds in his back, his white shirt turned red. A seventeen-year-old was riddled with gunfire from his heel to his head. A mother’s arm was blown off; her daughter’s stomach gouged by a bullet. Her husband’s head was pierced by shrapnel. Her nephew was shot in the neck, jaw, stomach, and hand. Like all the other victims, he was black—and unarmed.

Before the blood had dried on the pavement, the shooters, each a member of the New Orleans Police Department, and their supervisors hatched a cover-up. They planted a gun, invented witnesses, and charged two of their victims with attempted murder. At the NOPD, they were hailed as heroes.

Shots on the Bridge explores one of the most dramatic cases of police violence seen in our country in the last decade—the massacre of innocent people, carried out by members of the NOPD, in the brutal, disorderly days following Hurricane Katrina. It reveals the fear that gripped the police of a city slid into anarchy, the circumstances that drove desperate survivors to the bridge, and the horror that erupted when the police opened fire. It carefully unearths the cover-up that nearly buried the truth. And finally, it traces the legal maze that, a decade later, leaves the victims and their loved ones still searching for justice.

This is the story of how the people meant to protect and serve citizens can do violence, hide their tracks, and work the legal system as the nation awaits justice.

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386 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Spartacus in the Television Arena by Michael Cornelius (McFarland)

Description: Spartacus, the Thracian gladiator turned rebel leader, endures as a near-mythic hero who fought for the oppressed against a Roman oligarchy built on the backs of slave labor. The image of Spartacus as a noble if doomed avenger is familiar and his story has been retold through history as a cautionary tale about social injustice.
The television series Spartacus takes a different view, with a violent depiction of the man and his times and a focus on the archetype of the gladiator—powerful, courageous and righteous. This collection of new essays studies the series as an exploration of masculinity.
In the world of Spartacus, men jockey for social position, question the nature of their lives, examine their relationships with women and with each other, and explore their roles in society and the universe. The series also offers a compelling study of the composite nature of historical narrative in television and film, where key facts from original sources are interwoven with period embellishments, presenting audiences with a history and a fiction whose lines remain blurred by a distant yet all-too-familiar past.

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149 members requesting

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On sale Mar 25

Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU by Jenny Jaeckel (Raincloud Press)

Description: "When it was discovered that the author was suffering from a buildup of amniotic fluid, her doctors recommended inducing labor early. Shortly after the birth, physicians found that her daughter, Asa, suffered from tracheoesophageal fistula, a rare defect in the esophagus that needed to be corrected with surgery. So began a monthlong process to ensure that Asa could breathe and eat correctly and would be safe from the dangers of infection. It was touch and go, with Jaeckel and her husband, Cito, restricted in their access to Asa. Jaeckel was particularly affected by the stress of the situation. With this memoir, told in paneled illustrations like a graphic novel, the author chronicles her experiences with doctors and nurses (of various degrees of patience and gentleness), supportive friends, her intrusive mother, and the esoteric acronyms that categorize hospital life (“Her SATS are low,” reads one speech bubble. “She had T.P.N. and now she’s still N.P.O.”). The people in the memoir are represented in the illustrations as stylized animals, reminiscent of Art Spiegelman’s seminal graphic novel, Maus. Jaeckel and her family, too, are mice, while the supporting characters are a mix of dogs, cats, deer, frogs, and other endearingly drawn creatures. The illustrations greatly soften what, as simple prose, might read as an extremely serious and upsetting account of a sick infant. The depictions of Asa as a tiny mouse with wires and tubes taped to her body are simultaneously adorable and tragic. In the book’s strongest moments, Jaeckel discusses and draws her own fraught emotional state, which leads to very striking panels of symbolic representation: tiny animals separated by immense, inky blackness, and Asa tranquilly aloft among the stars or suspended at the middle of the tree of life. Though hospitals, and illness in general, can often rob patients of their individuality, Jaeckel has managed to represent such a world in a unique and highly personalized way.

A memorable and beautifully executed memoir of a newborn’s difficult first months." -Kirkus Reviews

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On sale Oct 07

Superforecasting by Phil Tetlock (Crown Publishing)

Description: In Superforecasting, Wharton professor Philip Tetlock and coauthor Dan Gardner offer a masterwork on prediction, drawing on decades of research and the results of a massive, government-funded forecasting tournament. The Good Judgment Project involves tens of thousands of ordinary people—including a Brooklyn filmmaker, a retired pipe installer, and a former ballroom dancer—who set out to forecast global events. Some of the volunteers have turned out to be astonishingly good. They've beaten other benchmarks, competitors, and prediction markets. They've even beaten the collective judgment of intelligence analysts with access to classified information. They are "superforecasters." In this groundbreaking and accessible book, Tetlock and Gardner show us how we can learn from this elite group. As reviewed in The Economist, "The techniques and habits of mind set out in this book are a gift to anyone who has to think about what the future might bring. In other words, to everyone."

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252 members requesting

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On sale Sep 13

The Beatles and the Historians by Erin Weber (McFarland)

Description: Hundreds of books have been written about The Beatles. Over the last half century, their story has been mythologized and de-mythologized and presented by biographers and journalists as history. Yet many of these works do not strictly qualify as history and the story of how the Beatles’ mythology continues to be told has been largely ignored.
This book examines the band’s historiography, exploring the four major narratives that have developed over time: The semi-whitewashed “Fab Four” account, the acrimonious breakup-era Lennon Remembers version, the biased “Shout!” narrative in the wake of John Lennon’s murder, and the current Mark Lewisohn orthodoxy. Drawing on the most influential primary and secondary sources, Beatles history is analyzed using historical methods.

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345 members requesting

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On sale Apr 01

The Beyoncé Effect by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek (McFarland)

Description: Since her late–1990s debut as a member of the R&B trio Destiny’s Child, Beyoncé Knowles has garnered both praise and criticism. While some consider her an icon of female empowerment, others see her as detrimental to feminism and representing a negative image of women of color. Her music has a decidedly pop aesthetic, yet her power-house vocals and lyrics focused on issues like feminine independence, healthy sexuality and post-partum depression give her songs dimension and substance beyond typical pop fare.
This collection of new essays presents a detailed study of the music and persona of Beyoncé—arguably the world’s biggest pop star. Topics include the body politics of respectability; feminism, empowerment and gender in Beyoncé’s lyrics; black female pleasure; and the changing face of celebrity motherhood.

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190 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

The Faerie Queene as Children’s Literature by Velma Richmond (McFarland)

Description: Edmund Spenser’s vast epic poem The Faerie Queene is the most challenging masterpiece in early modern literature and is praised as the work most representative of the Elizabethan age. In it he fused traditions of medieval romance and classical epic, his religious and political allegory creating a Protestant alternative to the Catholic romances rejected by humanists and Puritans. The poem was later made over as children’s literature, retold in lavish volumes and schoolbooks and appreciated in pedagogical studies and literary histories.
Distinguished writers for children simplified the stories and noted artists illustrated them. Children were less encouraged to consider the allegory than to be inspired to the moral virtues. This book studies The Faerie Queene’s many adaptations for a young audience in order to provide a richer understanding of both the original and adapted texts.

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338 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

The Mythology of the Superhero by Andrew Bahlmann (McFarland)

Description: Superheroes have been an integral part of popular society for decades and have given rise to a collective mythology familiar in popular culture worldwide. Though scholars and fans have recognized and commented on this mythology, its structure has gone largely unexplored. This book provides a model and lexicon for identifying the superhero mythos. The author examines the myth in several narratives—including Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Green Arrow and Beowulf—and discusses such diverse characters as Batman, Wolverine, Invincible and John Constantine.

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15 review copies available
451 members requesting

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On sale Apr 01

The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys' Club by Eileen Pollack (Beacon Press)

Description: Named one of the notable nonfiction books of 2015 by The Washington Post

A bracingly honest exploration of why there are still so few women in the hard sciences, mathematics, engineering, and computer science


In 2005, when Lawrence Summers, then president of Harvard, asked why so few women, even today, achieve tenured positions in the hard sciences, Eileen Pollack set out to find the answer. A successful fiction writer, Pollack had grown up in the 1960s and ’70s dreaming of a career as a theoretical astrophysicist. Denied the chance to take advanced courses in science and math, she nonetheless made her way to Yale. There, despite finding herself far behind the men in her classes, she went on to graduate summa cum laude, with honors, as one of the university’s first two women to earn a bachelor of science degree in physics. And yet, isolated, lacking in confidence, starved for encouragement, she abandoned her ambition to become a physicist.

Years later, spurred by the suggestion that innate differences in scientific and mathematical aptitude might account for the dearth of tenured female faculty at Summer’s institution, Pollack thought back on her own experiences and wondered what, if anything, had changed in the intervening decades.

Based on six years interviewing her former teachers and classmates, as well as dozens of other women who had dropped out before completing their degrees in science or found their careers less rewarding than they had hoped, The Only Woman in the Room is a bracingly honest, no-holds-barred examination of the social, interpersonal, and institutional barriers confronting women—and minorities—in the STEM fields. This frankly personal and informed book reflects on women’s experiences in a way that simple data can’t, documenting not only the more blatant bias of another era but all the subtle disincentives women in the sciences still face.

The Only Woman in the Room shows us the struggles women in the sciences have been hesitant to admit, and provides hope for changing attitudes and behaviors in ways that could bring far more women into fields in which even today they remain seriously underrepresented.

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15 review copies available
450 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

The Quick, the Dead and the Revived by Joseph Maddrey (McFarland)

Description: For well more than a century, Western films have embodied the United States’ most fundamental doctrine—expansionism—and depicted, in a uniquely American way, the archetypal battle between good and evil. Westerns also depict a country defined and re-defined by complex crises. World War II transformed the genre as well as the nation’s identity. Since then, Hollywood filmmakers have been fighting America’s ideological wars onscreen by translating modern-day politics into the timeless mythology of the Old West. This book surveys the most iconic and influential Westerns, examines Hollywood stars and their political stripes and reveals the familiar Westerns tropes—which became elements in popular action, science fiction and horror films. This then sets the stage for the Western revival of the 1990s and a period of reinvention in the 21st century.

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237 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation After the Genome by Alondra Nelson (Beacon Press)

Description: The unexpected story of how genetic testing is affecting race in America

We know DNA is a master key that unlocks medical and forensic secrets, but its genealogical life is both revelatory and endlessly fascinating. Tracing genealogy is now the second-most popular hobby amongst Americans, as well as the second-most visited online category. This billion-dollar industry has spawned popular television shows, websites, and Internet communities, and a booming heritage tourism circuit.

The tsunami of interest in genetic ancestry tracing from the African American community has been especially overwhelming. In The Social Life of DNA, Alondra Nelson takes us on an unprecedented journey into how the double helix has wound its way into the heart of the most urgent contemporary social issues around race.

For over a decade, Nelson has deeply studied this phenomenon. Artfully weaving together keenly observed interactions with root-seekers alongside illuminating historical details and revealing personal narrative, she shows that genetic genealogy is a new tool for addressing old and enduring issues. In The Social Life of DNA, she explains how these cutting-edge DNA-based techniques are being used in myriad ways, including grappling with the unfinished business of slavery: to foster reconciliation, to establish ties with African ancestral homelands, to rethink and sometimes alter citizenship, and to make legal claims for slavery reparations specifically based on ancestry.

Nelson incisively shows that DNA is a portal to the past that yields insight for the present and future, shining a light on social traumas and historical injustices that still resonate today. Science can be a crucial ally to activism to spur social change and transform twenty-first-century racial politics. But Nelson warns her readers to be discerning: for the social repair we seek can’t be found in even the most sophisticated science. Engrossing and highly original, The Social Life of DNA is a must-read for anyone interested in race, science, history and how our reckoning with the past may help us to chart a more just course for tomorrow.

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294 members requesting

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On sale Sep 20

The Supergirls (Revised and Updated) by Mike Madrid (Exterminating Angel Press)

Description: The classic alternative history of American comic book superheroines, in a new and revised edition."An essential read for pop-culture enthusiasts, feminists, comic-book readers, and social justice warriors."Kirkus Reviews,/i>“Madrid’s meticulous and passionate research provides a window into a seemingly lost herstory of patriotism, bravery, and progressive ways of thinking about female agency and adventure.” —JENNIFER K. STULLER,
author of Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology

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468 members requesting

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On sale Oct 14

The Trials of the King of Hampshire by Elizabeth Foyster (Oneworld Publications)

Description: Enter for a chance to win one of 15 copies of The Trials of the King of Hampshire - Madness, Secrecy and Betrayal in Georgian England

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317 members requesting

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On sale Sep 08

Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes (Crown Publishing)

Description: 20th Anniversary Edition: THE CLASSIC INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER, WITH A NEW RETROSPECTIVE AFTERWORD FROM FRANCES MAYES
Twenty years ago in Under the Tuscan Sun, Frances Mayes introduced readers to a wondrous new world when she bought and restored an abandoned villa in the spectacular Tuscan countryside. With her signature evocative language and vivid sensory descriptions, she described the beauty and simplicity of life in Italy, inspiring generations to embark on their own journeys—whether that be flying to a foreign country in search of themselves, tasting one of the book's dozens of delicious seasonal recipes, or simply engaging in the armchair travel for which Frances's writings are famous.
Now, with a new afterword from the Bard of Tuscany herself, a whole new crop of readers is poised to discover the tastes and passions of Italian living in our 20th anniversary edition.

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511 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06

Vikings and Goths by Gary Peterson (McFarland)

Description: The Vikings descended upon Europe at the close of the 8th century, invading the continent’s western seas and river systems, trading, raiding and spreading terror. In the north, they settled Iceland and Greenland and reached North America. In the east, Swedish Varangians established a river road to the Orient. With the collapse of the Viking commercial empire, Sweden and the other Scandinavian countries struggled to survive, their hardships exacerbated by internal strife, foreign domination and the Black Death.
This book details the development of Scandinavia—Sweden in particular—from the end of the Ice Age, through a series of prehistoric cultures, the Bronze and Iron ages, to the Viking period and late Middle Ages. Recent research suggests a Swedish origin of the Goths, who helped dismember the Roman Empire, and evidence of Swedish participation in the western Viking expeditions. Special attention is given to Eastern Europe, where Sweden dominated commerce through the conquest of trade towns and the river systems of Russia.

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426 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

What We're Fighting for Now Is Each Other: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Climate Justice by Wen Stephenson (Beacon Press)

Description: An urgent, on-the-ground look at some of the “new American radicals” who have laid everything on the line to build a stronger climate justice movement

The science is clear: catastrophic climate change, by any humane definition, is upon us. At the same time, the fossil-fuel industry has doubled down, economically and politically, on business as usual. We face an unprecedented situation—a radical situation. As an individual of conscience, how will you respond?

In 2010, journalist Wen Stephenson woke up to the true scale and urgency of the catastrophe bearing down on humanity, starting with the poorest and most vulnerable everywhere, and confronted what he calls “the spiritual crisis at the heart of the climate crisis.” Inspired by others who refused to retreat into various forms of denial and fatalism, he walked away from his career in mainstream media and became an activist, joining those working to build a transformative movement for climate justice in America.

In What We’re Fighting for Now Is Each Other, Stephenson tells his own story and offers an up-close, on-the-ground look at some of the remarkable and courageous people—those he calls “new American radicals”—who have laid everything on the line to build and inspire this fast-growing movement: old-school environmentalists and young climate-justice organizers, frontline community leaders and Texas tar-sands blockaders, Quakers and college students, evangelicals and Occupiers. Most important, Stephenson pushes beyond easy labels to understand who these people really are, what drives them, and what they’re ultimately fighting for. He argues that the movement is less like environmentalism as we know it and more like the great human-rights and social-justice struggles of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from abolitionism to civil rights. It’s a movement for human solidarity.

This is a fiercely urgent and profoundly spiritual journey into the climate-justice movement at a critical moment—in search of what climate justice, at this late hour, might yet mean.

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15 review copies available
223 members requesting

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On sale Oct 04

Why The Monkees Matter by Rosanne Welch (McFarland)

Description: A hit television show about a fictitious rock band, The Monkees (1966–1968) earned two Emmys—Outstanding Comedy Series and Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy.
Capitalizing on the show’s success, the actual band formed by the actors, at their peak, sold more albums than The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined, and set the stage for other musical TV characters from The Partridge Family to Hannah Montana. In the late 1980s, the Monkees began a series of reunion tours that continued into their 50th anniversary.
This book tells the story of The Monkees and how the show changed television, introducing a new generation to the fourth-wall-breaking slapstick created by Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers.
Its creators contributed to the innovative film and television of 1970s with projects like Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Laugh-In and Welcome Back, Kotter. Immense profits from the show, its music and its merchandising funded the producers’ move into films such as Head, Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces.

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15 review copies available
401 members requesting

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On sale Jun 01

Bayou, Whispers from the Past by Lauren Faulkenberry (Velvet Morning Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Thirty-one-year old Enza has finally found love with sexy fireman Jack, and through him, she has gained a family, years after her mother abandoned her. With her friend Kate in town, Enza’s looking forward to her first Christmas in Bayou Sabine, surrounded by those she cares about most.
But instead the holiday ends in turmoil. One guest puts someone Enza loves—and her relationship with Jack—in danger, and another guest brings news that makes Enza question the circumstances surrounding her mother’s departure.
Enza, fleeing Jack and the drama in Bayou Sabine, sets off with Kate on a road trip à la Thelma & Louise. But will she find answers about her mother’s disappearance and the strength to accept the truth? And will she return home in time to save everything that’s important to her?

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100 review copies available
174 members requesting

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On sale Oct 10
(all countries)

International Kittens of Mystery by Chris Dolley (BookViewCafe)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Format: Open, non-DRM file. Winners will be sent a coupon code and the URL of a webpage where they can download the eBook in ePub or Kindle format.

New edition with larger pictures


“Cat pictures! Silly jokes! Adventures! Exclamation points! This book constitutes the best-spent twenty minutes I've had in quite some time.” — What Book is That.

In an uncertain world there is one organization that stands head and small furry shoulders above the rest. Whenever the planet is in danger – be it from giant balls of wool or bands of renegade squirrels – only one group is guaranteed to answer the call.

The International Kittens of Mystery!

This is a journal of their stories. For the first time, cameras have been allowed into one of their top secret training camps – Training Camp Alpha. A camp where, under the supervision of pet humans, recruits are shown not only how to save the world but also how to manage their secret identities.

If you like a fun story with pictures of cute kittens saving the planet, this is the book for you.

It's a short read – about 30 minutes – and contains 75 large color pictures.

REVIEWS

“Hilarious! I can't wait to show this book to my sons. I know it will remain a source of fun for us for years to come.” — The True Book Addict

"Suspense! Intrigue! Silly jokes!! And cute kittens. INTERNATIONAL KITTENS OF MYSTERY has it all. The secrets of training kittens to become international superspies. The gadgetry, the secret knowledge (the power of cute) the combat practice, the mice. If you don't like cuteoverload.com or I can has Cheezburger/lolcats, this is not for you. If you know what those are I'm guessing you're ready for the INTERNATIONAL KITTENS OF MYSTERY." - Andi Schechter

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100 review copies available
248 members requesting

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On sale Aug 23
(all countries)

The Cairo Arrangement: A Novel by Bruce Colbert (Anaphora Literary Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: This frightening event occurred in present day Egypt. All the case computer files and people have since disappeared. It involved five countries and the world knows nothing about what really happened.

An ambitious Air Force commandant, oil-rich Saudis, fearful Israelis, CIA operatives and an Egyptian government, corrupt and avaricious from top to bottom, together fuel the rage and deceit that eventually became the Arab Spring.


“A first rate thriller. Colbert brilliantly draws you into the action. Get ready for a hell of a ride!” —Robert R. Maldonado, Lt Colonel (ret) US Air Force Special Operations, and author, Atlantis: Keepers of the Crystal Skull


Bruce Colbert is author of a short fiction collection, another novel and two poetry volumes. He lives on the Gulf Coast.

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100 review copies available
149 members requesting

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On sale Aug 23
(all countries)

The Princess Troll by Leah Cutter (BookViewCafe)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Format: Open, non-DRM file. Winners will be sent a coupon code and the URL of a webpage where they can download the eBook in ePub or Kindle format.

Seattle Troll Trilogy Book 2


Most trolls have no natural magical ability. However, Christine does. Enchanted powders swirl up when she walks by. Charms glow.

What happens when Christine tries to direct her magical powers?

Nothing. Nada. Zip.

Something blocks Christine from reaching her full magical potential.

But what?

"The Princess Troll"—the second novel in The Seattle Trolls trilogy and the delightful continuation "The Changeling Troll"—follows Christine on her journeys through a skewed Seattle and her encounters with outrageous and whimsical characters. A coming of age tale for all ages!

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100 review copies available
140 members requesting

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On sale Aug 16
(all countries)

Chef Q in Paris: The Fall Collection by Didier Quemener (Velvet Morning Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: A Parisian private chef shares his favorite fall recipes and anecdotes in this delicious collection with French flair!
As fall arrives, let’s change more than just our wardrobes—let’s reinvent our cooking with seasonal products! Too difficult or time-consuming? Not with these tips and quick and easy recipes from chef Didier Quémener. Didier’s cooking is all about seasonal ingredients (no strawberries on Didier’s table in November). He grew up in the French countryside, picking fresh fruit and vegetables in his grandmother’s garden and preparing flavorful meals at her side. Today, Didier brings that love for seasonal products to his guests and to you. As a result, your meals will be tastier, easier to make—and less expensive.
Is this a purely French cookbook? No! Didier, who’s traveled throughout the U.S., Europe and China, is greatly influenced by his voyages, and his cuisine is the perfect reflection of this. So if you like cookbooks with a seasonal and international touch, you’ll find this one especially delightful!

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100 review copies available
197 members requesting

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On sale Sep 06
(all countries)

The Encyclopedic Philosophy of Michel Serres: Writing The Modern World and Anticipating the Future by Keith Moser (Anaphora Literary Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: #1 New Release in Military Encyclopedias: Amazon

This monograph represents the first comprehensive study dedicated to the interdisciplinary French philosopher Michel Serres. As the title of this project unequivocally suggests, Serres’s prolific body of work paints a rending portrait of what it means for a sentient being to live in the modern world. This book reflects Serres’s profound conviction that “philosopher c’est anticiper”/ ‘to philosophize (about something) is to anticipate’ (“Philosophie Magazine”). According to Serres, a philosopher is someone who possesses an extremely broad base of knowledge coupled with the uncanny ability to envision what might transpire based upon his or her astute observations concerning phenomena that are already starting to unfold in a given society. Serres’s explanation of what engaging in philosophical inquiry entails encourages us to imagine all of the present and future ramifications of certain trajectories that are clearly visible all around us. From 1968 to the present, Serres has been generating forceful, “prophetic” visions in his works that mingle philosophy, religion, theology, contemporary science, and literature.

“In this comprehensive and insightful introduction, Keith Moser travels the highways and byways of Michel Serres’s thought to show how it both illuminates pressing contemporary issues and presages potential futures-to-come. This is a remarkable achievement and a genuine gift to readers both new and old to Serres’s work.” —Steven D. Brown, Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Leicester, United Kingdom

“At a time in which overspecialization hangs over all disciplines, thinkers who have a global, interdisciplinary base of knowledge are quite rare. Therefore, I would like to laud Keith Moser’s initiative to dedicate an exhaustive study to one of these thinkers, Michel Serres, who thanks to his ‘encyclopedic’ knowledge, has the ability to understand a rapidly changing world and to predict ‘the shape of things to come.’ In short, an essential book for becoming aware of the threat of a return of obscurantism—despite the development of new technologies—and of the necessity of a new century of Lumières.” —Issa Asgarally, Associate Professor, Mauritius Institute of Education, Linguist, author and co-founder, along with J.M.G. Le Clézio, of the Foundation for Interculturality and Peace

“A much needed English language introduction to the ideas of a major French eco-philosopher and pacifist whose prophetic work spans the period from the late 60’s to the present. Moser’s engaging prose makes this study a great read, and he demonstrates a formidable grasp on the connections within Serres’ work, as well as the links between Serres and other major twentieth century thinkers.” —Tom Trzyna, Professor Emeritus of English, Seattle Pacific University

“Professor Keith Moser’s treatment of Michel Serres’ philosophy in the context of contemporary 21st-century globalization is both timely and thorough. His provocative critique of societal malaise, from our relationship to the planet, to ourselves, to each other, and to technology, as well as the solutions envisioned through an erudite and thoughtful analysis of Serres’ entire philosophical corpus is a remarkable contribution to both the fields of Philosophy and French Studies.” —Isaac Joslin, The University of Denver

“Entertaining, gloomy, and sharp, Moser’s careful and exhaustive exploration of Michel Serres’ encyclopedic philosophy unveils the eccentricity of a rare thinker who has managed to shake the insularity of academic specialty. The range of topics tackled in this book – with the help of a diverse arsenal of disciplines – leaves the reader better able to think about a world in which the more technological and scientific advancements arise, the more unknowable it becomes. Moser believes that the world we’re coming into was not only foreshadowed by Serres, but necessitates his thinking to best wrestle with it.” —Zachary Siegel, Independent Researcher, Journalist, and Contributor to Critical-theory.com

“Keith Moser’s pioneering vision of the post-Marxist era, as reflected in the syncretism of philosophy, religion, theology, science and literature in Michel Serres’ body of work during the last half a century, transforms human consciousness beyond its illusory genophobia that has damaged the very semiotics of life. Moser’s monograph taps into a tremendous flow of energy that evokes a passionate desire in a dead humanity to re-live and re-think.” —Professor Ananta Ch. Sukla, Editor, Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics

Keith Moser is Associate Professor of French at Mississippi State University. He is the author of four other books including A Practical Guide to French Harki Literature, J.M.G. Le Clézio: A Concerned Citizen of the Global Village, J.M.G. Le Clézio dans la forêt des paradoxes (co-editor with Bruno Thibault), and ‘Privileged Moments’ in the Novels and Short Stories of J.M.G. Le Clézio: His Contemporary Development of a Traditional French Literary Device. Moser has also contributed approximately forty essays to peer-reviewed publications such as The French Review, The International Journal of Francophone Studies, Romance Notes, Dalhousie French Studies, Les Cahiers Le Clézio, Modern Language Review, French Cultural Studies, Forum for Modern Language Studies (Oxford UP), Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment (Oxford UP), and The Pennsylvania Literary Journal.

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100 review copies available
101 members requesting

Request by Aug 29
On sale Aug 15
(all countries)

Lies, Love and Redemption by Kelli A. Wilkins (Medallion Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: THE ADVANCE REVIEW COPY IS AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC .PDF FORMAT ONLY.

Shot and left for dead, Sam Hixton stumbles into a general store on the Nebraska prairie and collapses into the arms of Cassie Wilcox.

Cassie’s world is turned upside down when the handsome stranger drops into her life. Sam is another complication she doesn’t need: her business is dying and her trouble with the townspeople is escalating. Yet she’s determined to keep the store open — no matter what the cost.

As Sam recovers from his injuries, he hides the truth about his identity and convinces Cassie to let him work in the store. He’s attracted to her and admires her independent nature but quickly realizes Cassie’s in way over her head. They fight their growing attraction, and Cassie questions whether she can trust her fragile heart to a mysterious stranger. Will he accept her once he knows about her troubled past?

Cassie resists Sam’s advances and represses her feelings until one fateful night when they give in to their fiery passion. Together, they work out a plan to save the store but find their efforts are thwarted—and their lives endangered—by the locals.

Sam’s secret returns to haunt him and pulls him away just when Cassie needs him the most. Will he regain her trust when she learns the truth? Cassie has everything invested in the store—can she save it and find true love with Sam before it’s too late?

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30 review copies available
115 members requesting

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On sale Sep 19
(all countries)

I, Death by Mark Leslie (EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: A Novel

It’s not “boy meets girl, boy loses girl,” but rather “Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy’s friends begin dropping like flies.” — Peter O’Mallick isn’t just having a bad day; he’s having a bad life.

It’s bad enough when your girlfriend suddenly casts you a cold shoulder, your grades are slipping and those around you no longer understand what it’s like to walk in your shoes; but walking around with the innate power to end lives—something Peter begins to realize he has had since birth—takes the angst to a whole new level.

And Hamlet thought he had it bad.

Encouraged by his guidance counsellor, the suicidal seventeen year old begins to blog about his experiences in order to try to understand this power and himself. The self-directed therapy helps, and strangers who follow his online story virtually befriend him, as it appears that his curse is mostly limited to those he is in close contact with.

However, there is one stranger secretly following his story who isn’t there to understand, help or cheer him on; just as Peter begins to understand that being born as a harbinger for death might actually be a blessing rather than a curse, this stranger is intent on finding a way to use Peter’s power for nefarious purposes.

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25 review copies available
137 members requesting

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On sale Aug 01

Making the Rounds by Allan Weiss (EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: WHO CAN HELP...

...when a word decides to get up and leave your holy book?
...when you’re a mayor and your city is literally crumbling around you?
...when the evil Haman, villain of the Purim story, seems to have arisen from the dead to terrorize your town?

Eliezer ben-Avraham, wizard, Kabbalist, and kvetch, not only can but must help. Because he poked around in areas of forbidden knowledge, he is obliged to wander the world and use the powers he gained to perform good deeds—mitzvot—for anybody who asks, no matter how bizarre the task. Ably assisted by his trusty but cynical steed, Melech, Eliezer does what he can, although transforming into a bird and flying around is difficult when you have arthritis in your shoulder.

Humourous, philosophical, and very weird, Eliezer’s adventures as he makes his rounds demonstrate how important it is to be generous with your gifts, even to the craziest goyim.

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Murder in the Generative Kitchen by Meg Pontecorvo (World Weaver Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: This ebook novella is available in .mobi (for Kindle) or .epub (for most other ereaders).

With the Vacation Jury Duty system, jurors can lounge on a comfortable beach while watching the trial via virtual reality. Julio is loving the beach, as well as the views of a curvy fellow juror with a rainbow-lacquered skin modification who seems to be the exact opposite of his recent ex-girlfriend back in Chicago. Because of jury sequestration rules, they can’t talk to each other at all, or else they’ll have to pay full price for this Acapulco vacation. Still, Julio is desperate to catch her attention. But while he struts and tries to catch her eye, he also becomes fascinated by the trial at hand.

At first it seemed a foregone conclusion that the woman on trial used a high-tech generative kitchen to feed her husband a poisonous meal, but the more evidence mounts, the more Julio starts to suspect the kitchen may have made the decision on its own.

About the Author
A writer and artist dedicated to multiple genres, Meg Pontecorvo earned an MFA in Poetry Writing from Washington University in St. Louis and is a 2010 graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop. Meg has published a novelette, “Grounded,” in Asimov’s, and her artwork in collage and pen has been featured in experimental video performances in the Bay Area. A native of Philadelphia, she grew up in the Midwest and now shares a small apartment with her partner and cats in San Francisco, where she cooks in a tech-free kitchen.

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On sale Sep 27
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Playing with Fire by Tess Gerritsen (Ballantine Books)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: A gripping standalone thriller by the New York Times bestselling author of the Rizzoli & Isles series

INTERNATIONAL THRILLER WRITERS AWARD FINALIST • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY LOS ANGELES TIMES AND SUSPENSE MAGAZINE

In a shadowy antiques shop in Rome, violinist Julia Ansdell happens upon a curious piece of music—the Incendio waltz—and is immediately entranced by its unusual composition. Full of passion, torment, and chilling beauty, and seemingly unknown to the world, the waltz, its mournful minor key, its feverish arpeggios, appear to dance with a strange life of their own. Julia is determined to master the complex work and make its melody heard.

Back home in Boston, from the moment Julia’s bow moves across the strings, drawing the waltz’s fiery notes into the air, something strange is stirred—and Julia’s world comes under threat. The music has a terrifying and inexplicable effect on her young daughter, who seems violently transformed. Convinced that the hypnotic strains of Incendio are weaving a malevolent spell, Julia sets out to discover the man and the meaning behind the score.

Her quest beckons Julia to the ancient city of Venice, where she uncovers a dark, decades-old secret involving a dangerously powerful family that will stop at nothing to keep Julia from bringing the truth to light.

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On sale Aug 02

Speculative Story Bites by Sarena Ulibarri (World Weaver Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Fifteen bite-sized stories, offering a sampler platter of fantasy, science fiction, and paranormal horror. Within these pages, you’ll find flower fairies, alien brothels, were-bears, and sentient houses. Step inside a museum where all the displays are haunted, follow a siren into the underworld as she searches for Persephone, and discover the doors that lie, literally, behind the heart.



Featuring stories by Shannon Phillips, Adam Gaylord, Rebecca Roland, Dianne Williams, M.T. Reiten, Larry Hodges, Anya J. Davis, Jamie Lackey, Megan Neumann, Kristina Wojtaszek, Gregory Scheckler, Sandi Leibowitz, Nora Mulligan, Tom Howard, and A.E. Decker.

About the Anthologist:
Sarena Ulibarri (Editor-in-Chief, World Weaver Press) is a graduate of the Clarion Fantasy and Science Fiction Writers' Workshop at UCSD, and earned an MFA from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her fiction has appeared in Lightspeed, Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, and a variety of other magazines and anthologies. She lives in New Mexico, and has two corgis. Find her online at sarenaulibarri.com or @sarenaulibarri.

Ebook available in .mobi (for Kindle) and .epub (for most other ereaders).

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On sale Aug 09
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Stay Crazy by Erica L. Satifka (Apex Publications)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Available in PDF, ePub, and mobi formats.

After a breakdown at college landed Emmeline Kalberg in a mental hospital, she’s struggling to get her life on track. She’s back in her hometown and everyone knows she’s crazy, but the twelve pills she takes every day keep her anxiety and paranoia in check. So when a voice that calls itself Escodex begins talking to Em from a box of frozen chicken nuggets, she’s sure that it’s real and not another hallucination. Well … pretty sure.

An evil entity is taking over the employees of Savertown USA, sucking out their energy so it can break into Escodex’s dimension. When her coworkers start dying, Em realizes that she may be the only one who can stop things from getting worse. Now she must convince her therapist she’s not having a relapse and keep her boss from firing her. All while getting her coworker Roger to help enact the plans Escodex conveys to her though the RFID chips in the Savertown USA products. It’s enough to make anyone Stay Crazy.

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On sale Aug 16
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Cat's Pawn by Leslie Gadallah (Five Rivers Publishing)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Book 1 of The Empire of Kaz, Leslie Gadallah’s fascinating alien political intrigue.

The Kazi Empire is slowly, inexorably, expanding up the arm of the Galaxy. Only the Oriani see the danger, and only Ambassador Talan recognizes the need to include humans in the alliance to oppose the Kaz. Unfortunately, in the chess of interstellar diplomacy, humans make terrible pawns.

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On sale Nov 01
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Eocene Station by Dave Duncan (Five Rivers Publishing)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: K. N. ‘Cannon’ Ball and his superstar wife, Tempest, are running for their lives. Cannon has exposed a fraud so huge even heads of government are implicated and determined to keep Cannon from ever testifying. Nowhere is safe, so they step out of time to a research station fifty million years in the past. The dinosaurs died out eons ago and there aren’t any people around, so they ought to be safe then, right? Wrong, very wrong!

A new Dave Duncan novel is always a reason to celebrate, and his trademark blend of high adventure, hard science, and wry humour makes Eocene Station a must read.

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On sale Oct 01
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The Great Sky by D.G. Laderoute (Five Rivers Publishing)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: From a rising star in Canadian fantasy, a fascinating and rocketing read.

The first time Piper Preach died he was ten years old. But the Anishnaabe spirits thought otherwise.

Now, six year later, Piper struggles with the hard realities of life in a big city. The ancient ways of his people are a distant memory. But the spirits aren’t done with him.

Pulled into their bizarre world, the place the Anishnaabe call The Great Sky, he’s plunged into the middle of a brutal war raging just a step away from reality. And this time there may be no escaping death – or even worse.

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On sale Oct 01
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The Rogue's Surrender by Katherine Bone (EsKape Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: **PDF***

Marked for death! Lady Mercedes Vasquez Claremont has been betrayed by a member of Nelson’s Tea. Now her life is in the hands of the man she couldn’t save, a beast forged by Spanish hatred.
Lord Garrick Seaton, aka Captain Blade, is the only one who has a chance of pulling off a lifesaving mission. To do so, he must go to Spain and face memories of captivity and torture. But the fiery Spanish lady he seeks to rescue proves to be the greater threat. Can he protect his heart, or will she demand his complete surrender?

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On sale Jul 12
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Pierre Elliott Trudeau, 15th Prime Minister of Canada by Paula Johanson (Five Rivers Publishing)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: To know our Prime Ministers is to take some pride in the eclectic collection of individuals and stories that make up our history. Whatever our politics, whatever one may think of individual PMs and their decisions, one recognizes that they are a mirror to their times, a reflection of who we were and where we come from. Those who do not know our history are doomed to believe it boring; those who do know, gain the bragging rights that come from having great and colourful ancestors. - Dr. Robert Runté

Before he was elected to office, he hitch-hiked across North Africa, swam the Bosporus Strait on a whim, and ran with the bulls in Pamplona – twice. Pierre Elliot Trudeau, Canada’s 15th Prime Minister, could be called the most colourful of them all.

Trudeau was confident that his informed opinions were good for all Canadians. Not everyone agreed. Suspending civil liberties with the War Measures Act wasn't even his most controversial decision, at least, not to those who are still stuttering mad about his National Energy Program or White Paper on Indian Affairs. From his youth as a backwoods canoeist and political activist, to his retirement from politics and the law, Pierre Trudeau lived a life that was, as he put it, “one long curve, full of turning points.”

That long curve is traced in this new biography, with turning points from Pierre Trudeau's home life, his political machinations, and the lifelong love he had for wilderness places. Details come together here in a narrative that shows how he became a citizen of the world.

Volume 15 of The Prime Ministers of Canada Series.

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On sale Dec 01
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Best Worst American by Juan Martinez (Small Beer Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: This is a drm-free PDF ebook. No other formats are available at this time.

Imaginary countries. Real countries. The best and worst of both in short, cutting, refreshing stories.

These are the best of Americans, the worst of Americans. In these stories (these cities, these people) there are labyrinths, rivers, wildernesses. Voices sound slightly different than expected. There’s humor, but it’s going to hurt.

In “On Paradise,” a petshop manager flies with his cat to Las Vegas to meet his long-lost mother and grandmother, only to find that the women look exactly like they did forty years before. In “The Spooky Japanese Girl is There For You,” the spooky Japanese girl (a ghost) is there for you, then she is not.

These refreshing and invigorating stories of displacement, exile, and identity, of men who find themselves confused by the presence or absence of extraordinary women, jump up, demand to be read, and send the reader back to the earth changed: reminded from these short stories how big the world is.

Praise for Juan Martinez's stories:

"I feel sure that some smart and appreciative person will praise Juan Martinez for his ‘skewed vision,’ but Martinez’s view of the world is startlingly clear. It’s just that the rest of us haven’t caught up yet. Deep and comic and deeply comic, his is a collection of wonders for any human to enjoy."
—Jack Pendarvis

"Juan Martinez's Best Worst American is filled with droll, cunning, funny, and formally innovative stories that fall somewhere between stand-up comedy and literary fiction. These excellent works mark him as a writer both to read and watch."
— Tom Bissell

“A little out of the ordinary.... He takes this very unnatural environment and changes it into a landscape.”
— Hannah Tinti

“I loved it.”
— Etgar Keret

Table of Contents

Roadblock
Strangers on Vacation: Snapshots
Machulín In L.A.
On Paradise
Domokun in Fremont
The Women Who Talk To Themselves
Customer Service at the Karaoke Don Quixote
Your Significant Other’s Kitten Poster
Well Tended
Souvenirs from Ganymede
The Coca-Cola Executive in the Zapatoca Outhouse
Correspondences between the Lower World and Old Men in Pinstripe Suits
The Lead Singer Is Distracting Me
Errands
Liner Notes for Renegade, the Opening Sequence
Hobbledehoydom
My Sister’s Knees
The Spooky Japanese Girl Is There For You
Big Wheel, Boiling Hot
After the End of the World: A Capsule Review
Debtor
Forsaken, the Crew Awaited News from the People Below
Northern
Best Worst American

About the Author

Juan Martinez was born in Bucaramanga, Colombia, and has since lived in Orlando, Florida, and Las Vegas, Nevada. He now lives in Chicago with his wife, the writer Sarah Kokernot, and their son and two cats. He’s an assistant professor at Northwestern University. His work and has appeared in various literary journals and anthologies, including Glimmer Train, McSweeney's, Ecotone, Huizache, TriQuarterly, Conjunctions, the Cossack Review, the Santa Monica Review, National Public Radio's Selected Shorts, Norton's Sudden Fiction Latino, and elsewhere. Visit and say hi at fulmerford.com.

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On sale Feb 07

Omega Rising by Anna Kyle (World Weaver Press)

This book is an eBook, not a physical book.

Description: Cass Nolan has been forced to avoid the burn of human touch for her whole life, drawing comfort instead from her dreams of a silver wolf—her protector, her friend. When her stalking nightmares return, her imaginary dead sister’s ghost tells her to run, Cass knows she should listen, but the sinfully hot stranger she just hired to work on her ranch has her mind buzzing with possibilities. Not only does her skin accept Nathan’s touch, it demands it. Cass must make a decision—run again and hope she saves the people who have become her family, or stand and fight. Question is, will it be with Nathan or against him?

Nathan Rivers’ life is consumed by his quest to find the Omega wolf responsible for killing his brother, but when the trail leads him to Cass and her merry band of shapeshifters, his wolf wants only to claim her for himself. When evidence begins piling up that Cass is the Omega he’s been seeking, things become complicated—especially since someone else wants her dead. Saving her life might mean sacrificing his own, but it may be worth it to save the woman he can’t keep from reaching for.

About the Author:
Anna Kyle wrote her first story at age 12 on an old manual typewriter, and though the technology has changed, she hasn’t stopped since. She lives in the Midwest surrounded by family and friends and dogs and horses. They’ve forgiven her (mostly) when they appear in her stories. She reads everything she can get her hands on, but romances, especially paranormals, are her favorite. Vampires, humans, Fae, shapeshifters, or demons, it doesn’t matter—Anna’s heart goes pitter-pat for the Happily Ever After. Hot heroes + strong, funny heroines = awesome. Find her at AnnaKyle.com

Ebook available in .mobi (for Kindle) and .epub (for most other ereaders).

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On sale Jun 07
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Big Wish by Brandon Robshaw (Recorded Books)

This is an audiobook.

Description: Narrated by : Brandon Robshaw
Eleven-year-old Sam has a problem. Well, quite a few problems.
So when he sees a shooting star, he naturally wishes on it—for a million wishes. Of course, he doesn’t expect the wish to come true, but somehow it does. Soon Sam is changing his life, but big changes have consequences, and not always in the way he had hoped.

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On sale Jul 21

The Peculiar Miracles of Antoinette Martin by Stephanie Knipper (HighBridge Audio)

This is an audiobook.

Description: Sisters Rose and Lily Martin were inseparable when they were kids. As adults, they've been estranged for years, until circumstances force them to come together to protect Rose's daughter. Ten-year-old Antoinette has a severe form of autism that requires constant care and attention. She has never spoken a word, but she has a powerful gift that others would give anything to harness: she can heal things with her touch. She brings wilted flowers back to life, makes a neighbor's tremors disappear, and changes the normal course of nature on the Kentucky flower farm where she and her mother live.

Antoinette's gift, though, puts her own life in danger, as each healing comes with an increasingly deadly price. As Rose—the center of her daughter's life—struggles with her own failing health, and Lily confronts her anguished past, they, and the men who love them, come to realize the sacrifices that must be made to keep this very special child safe.

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248 members requesting

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On sale Aug 02

War Dogs by Guy Lawson (Recorded Books)

This is an audiobook.

Description: In January of 2007, three young stoners from Miami Beach were put in charge of a $300 million Department of Defense contract to supply ammunition to the Afghanistan military. Instead of fulfilling the order with high-quality arms, Efraim Diveroli, David Packouz, and Alex Podrizki (the dudes) bought cheap Communist-style surplus ammunition from Balkan gunrunners. The trio then secretly repackaged millions of rounds of shoddy Chinese ammunition and shipped it to Kabul—until they were caught by Pentagon investigators and the scandal turned up on the front page of The New York Times.

That’s the “official” story. The truth is far more explosive. For the first time, journalist Guy Lawson tells the thrilling true tale. It’s a trip that goes from a dive apartment in Miami Beach to mountain caves in Albania, the corridors of power in Washington, and the frontlines of Iraq and Afghanistan. Lawson’s account includes a shady Swiss gunrunner, Russian arms dealers, Albanian thugs, and a Pentagon investigation that caused ammunition shortages for the Afghanistan military. Lawson exposes the mysterious and murky world of global arms dealing, showing how the American military came to use private contractors like Diveroli, Packouz, and Podrizki as middlemen to secure weapons from illegal arms dealers—the same men who sell guns to dictators, warlords, and drug traffickers.

This is a story you were never meant to read.

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On sale Aug 02

The Last Punisher: A SEAL Team THREE Sniper's True Account of the Battle of Ramadi by Kevin Lacz (Tantor Media)

This is an audiobook.

Description: The Last Punisher is a bold, no-holds-barred first-person account of the Iraq War. With wry humor and moving testimony, Kevin Lacz tells the story of his tour in Iraq with SEAL Team Three, the warrior elite of the Navy. This legendary unit, known as "The Punishers," included Chris Kyle (American Sniper), Mike Monsoor, Ryan Job, and Marc Lee. These brave men were instrumental in securing the key locations in the pivotal 2006 Battle of Ramadi, told with stunning detail in this book.

Minute by minute, Lacz relays the edge-of-your-seat details of his team's missions in Ramadi, offering a firsthand glimpse into the heated combat, extreme conditions, and harrowing experiences they faced every day. Through it all, Lacz and his teammates formed unbreakable bonds and never lost sight of the cause: protecting America with their fight.

The Last Punisher brings the listener into the life and mind of a SEAL, demonstrating the tough realities of war. At the same time, Lacz shares how these experiences made him a better man and how proud he is of his contributions to one of this country's most difficult military campaigns.

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176 members requesting

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On sale Aug 16
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