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A Field Guide to Hawks of North America (Peterson Field Guides) (1987)

by William S. Clark

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334261,191 (4.04)2
Publisher's description: This guide includes all 39 species of North American hawks and other diurnal raptors, including eagles, falcons, and vultures. Color paintings and photographs show each species in various color morphs and plumages, which are also described in detail.
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This is one of those that separates the maps from the text from the pictures, which I have always found extremely annoying. But it is detailed enough and thorough enough that I have often been able to make an ID with it that I never would have otherwise. Don't leave home without it. ( )
  DocWood | Feb 13, 2011 |
Peterson Field Guides are among the most-respected in the genre of field identification guides, and with good reason: pocket-sized, with wipable covers and smooth pages, rulers along the margins of the book's covers for measuring specimens, and thousands of illustrations of birds of prey, descriptions of their calls, their habitat, their habits, and their varied phases (from juvenile to adult), make these guides invaluable for the serious bird-watcher. They are also a good barometer of how quickly we are losing some species, sadly. An older edition I have, shows some species not shown in this 2001 edition. They've gone extinct. For instance the Snail Kite maybe extinct. They are so specialized, and their habitat so unique, that they cannot survive the development of the Everglades much longer. ( )
  J_Starling | Jan 28, 2009 |
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The purpose of this field guide is to present the latest tried and proven field marks for accurate field identification of the 35 regularly occurring and 12 vagrant diurnal raptor species in North America.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Publisher's description: This guide includes all 39 species of North American hawks and other diurnal raptors, including eagles, falcons, and vultures. Color paintings and photographs show each species in various color morphs and plumages, which are also described in detail.

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