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Atlas of the Heart: Mapping Meaningful Connection and the Language of Human Experience

by Brene Brown

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1,369914,036 (4.25)11
Business. Psychology. Nonfiction. Self Help. HTML:#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In her latest book, Brené Brown writes, “If we want to find the way back to ourselves and one another, we need language and the grounded confidence to both tell our stories and be stewards of the stories that we hear. This is the framework for meaningful connection.”
In Atlas of the Heart, Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.
 
Over the past two decades, Brown’s extensive research into the experiences that make us who we are has shaped the cultural conversation and helped define what it means to be courageous with our lives. Atlas of the Heart draws on this research, as well as on Brown’s singular skills as a storyteller, to show us how accurately naming an experience doesn’t give the experience more power, it gives us the power of understanding, meaning, and choice.
 
Brown shares, “I want this book to be an atlas for all of us, because I believe that, with an adventurous heart and the right maps, we can travel anywhere and never fear losing ourselves.”
*Includes a downloadable PDF of illustrations from the book.
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» See also 11 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Atlas of the Heart by Brene Brown was an introduction to emotions, a full range that gets beyond the "happy, sad, mad" that most people mention when asked to describe their various emotions. There are some 90 or so, grouped together in families of 5 to 10. Brown uses her extensive data sets to tease out the similarities but, more importantly, the differences between emotions like jealousy and envy or happiness and joy. Her final grouping is the most jarring as it traces how hatred can be turned into disgust which, when focused on other groups of people, leads to dehumanization. The book takes an upbeat approach with comic strips, hand illustrated charts and full page pull quotes.

I have only read one other Brown book--The Gifts of Imperfection--and I enjoyed her irreverent style of presenting her research. She is a qualitative researcher who love to tell the stories she encounters. But, she is also able to take all the data and organize it in a way that supports the bigger picture.

I have a couple other Brown books on the shelf and may move them closer to the top of the TBR.
  witchyrichy | Jan 28, 2024 |
I liked the clear definitions and applications of each emotion. I also liked the ending and how she focuses more on one’s connection to and recognition of one’s own emotions and how that impacts us. It wasn’t quite what I was looking for, hence three stars ( )
  sophia.magyk | Jan 3, 2024 |
In this book, the author takes us on a journey through 87 of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances -- a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moment with one another in a way that builds connection.
  PendleHillLibrary | Aug 21, 2023 |
I enjoyed this book. I am an emotional person and find joy in talking about our feelings. The book discusses so many different emotions. Having a wide range of vocab to describe your feelings can help you understand why you feel the way you do. It can help others understand as well. The book give you tools. Brene Brown sets us up with a framework to help and guide us to create meaningful connections and being our authentic self. ( )
  Moonchild80 | Jul 5, 2023 |
As someone who likes words that “indicate precisely what you mean to say” (to borrow a line from the Beatles song “When I’m 64”), I really liked this book. It digs into 87 different emotions and explains why it’s important to have a rich vocabulary to describe your feelings. The more tools you have at your disposal to describe how you’re feeling, the easier it is to figure out why you’re feeling the way you are and channel or resolve the emotions as necessary. The book contains short comics by Gavin Aung Than that tell stories to emphasize the points being made. I liked this enough to want my own copy to flip through. ( )
  rabbitprincess | Feb 10, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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Heart is a sea, language is shore. Whatever sea includes, will hit the shore. -Rumi
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I am not a sentimental keeper of things.
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Business. Psychology. Nonfiction. Self Help. HTML:#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In her latest book, Brené Brown writes, “If we want to find the way back to ourselves and one another, we need language and the grounded confidence to both tell our stories and be stewards of the stories that we hear. This is the framework for meaningful connection.”
In Atlas of the Heart, Brown takes us on a journey through eighty-seven of the emotions and experiences that define what it means to be human. As she maps the necessary skills and an actionable framework for meaningful connection, she gives us the language and tools to access a universe of new choices and second chances—a universe where we can share and steward the stories of our bravest and most heartbreaking moments with one another in a way that builds connection.
 
Over the past two decades, Brown’s extensive research into the experiences that make us who we are has shaped the cultural conversation and helped define what it means to be courageous with our lives. Atlas of the Heart draws on this research, as well as on Brown’s singular skills as a storyteller, to show us how accurately naming an experience doesn’t give the experience more power, it gives us the power of understanding, meaning, and choice.
 
Brown shares, “I want this book to be an atlas for all of us, because I believe that, with an adventurous heart and the right maps, we can travel anywhere and never fear losing ourselves.”
*Includes a downloadable PDF of illustrations from the book.

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