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The Little Lady Agency

by Hester Browne

Series: Little Lady Agency (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0052820,928 (3.68)21
Fiction. Literature. Romance. HTML:Hilarious and warmhearted, this "deliciously addictive" (Cosmopolitan) debut romantic comedy stars a woman who goes from doormat to diva when she sets up shop as the ultimate freelance girlfriend.
Melissa Romney-Jones can bake a perfect sponge cake, type her little heart out, and plan a party blindfolded. But none of that has helped her get far in life or in love. When she gets fired ?? again ?? she decides to market her impeccable social skills to single men. To avoid embarrassing her father, a Member of Parliament, Melissa dons a blond wig and becomes Honey, a no-nonsense bombshell who helps clueless bachelors shop, entertain, and navigate social minefields. She even attends parties if a client needs a "date." But when a dashing American starts to request Honey's services on a regular basis, it's only a matter of time before Honey's and Melissa's worlds colli… (more)
  1. 10
    Size 12 Is Not Fat by Meg Cabot (kathleen.morrow)
    kathleen.morrow: Similar writing style and sense of humor. Both are well-written, engaging, easy to read
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» See also 21 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
Sweet book easy read with some issues. Romance early 2000 with limited social media and set in England ( )
  shazjhb | Feb 14, 2024 |
Fluff. Marshmallow. Won’t continue the series, but it was a pleasant diversion. ( )
  PattyLee | Dec 14, 2021 |
Funny tongue-in-cheek story of a woman who decides to use her "womanly skills" (no, not a hooker) to help men understand women ( )
  WonderlandGrrl | Jan 29, 2016 |
I wonder if art colleges offer courses in chick-lit book-cover design? The cover of Hester Browne's [b:The Little Lady Agency|137098|The Little Lady Agency|Hester Browne|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172087867s/137098.jpg|982677] screams CHICK-LIT and that's exactly what's sandwiched between the covers. And a marvelous example of the genre it is, too.

Melissa Romney-Jones is the daughter of a slimy and successful British politician. After losing her job with an up-market estate agency, she decides to sign up with a respectable escort service run by one of her former school teachers. One appointment with a client convinces her that the agency is less than respectable, so she decides to go into business herself, hiding her identity behind the flashy blonde persona of 'Honey'. She accomplishes the metamorphosis with ease, thanks to her innate managerial skills, her social connections, a blonde wig, a top-heavy hourglass figure, and the help of an awesome arsenal of military-grade girdles and corsets.

Business blossoms and she nets a perfect client: Jonathan, the new American boss of her former estate agency. Hot, handsome and rich.

I would have enjoyed this book immensely even if Ms Browne had limited the arc to Melissa/Honey, her ever-fascinating business assignments, and her growing relationship with super-client Jonathan.

It's a pity the author didn't ease off on some of the side stories: Mel's BFF relationship with her too-perfect male flatmate, her utterly dysfunctional family (Granny excepted), and the plot manipulation that leaves Mel wondering whether she should go for flatmate Nelson or client Jonathan.

Chick-lit is funny and frivolous by definition, but that doesn't absolve the author from taking as much care with the narrative and characterisation as she would for a straight romance or a suspense mystery.

Characters who didn't ring true because of a lack of information, or an over-abundance of false leads, were Mel's MP father, flatmate Nelson, sister Emma, and old friend Gabi.

I wasn't able to read the book in one sitting and had to put it aside overnight. The next morning, instead of returning to the book, I found myself exploring the latest batch of new publication emails from various publishers, and popping three or four ebooks into my shopping cart. I was tempted to start reading some these new acquisitions but pushed myself to resume [b:The Little Lady Agency|137098|The Little Lady Agency|Hester Browne|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172087867s/137098.jpg|982677] and read it to the end. I'm glad I did, but the temporary loss of interest underlines some of the weaknesses in an otherwise thoroughly enjoyable and very witty story with a memorable heroine. ( )
  skirret | Jan 2, 2015 |
I seem to find myself reading a lot of chick lit lately. But I think I'm starting to tire of it again.

This book was silly and girly and I contemplated dropping it about 30 pages in, but then there were a couple things that were interesting so I stuck around and finished it.

I didn't particularly like the narrator,Melissa. She was strangely bossy and meek at the same time. Like she had a split personality or something. I didn't like any of the scenes with her family. It just seemed like unnecessary chaos and randomness in the plot. Especially the plot lines like the baby or the evil nanny. Quite odd. I always wanted to skip those family scenes and go straight to the other plots.

Honestly the only reason I read this book was because I wanted to see how the scenes would play out with Melissa dealing with Nicky and Nelson. There was enough tension there that it was interesting. And even though Melissa was a little too oblivious to innuendoes (c'mon, you're helping men with romance and you don't get those jokes?!), I liked the progression.

She's just too oblivious. Especially to her own feelings.

This is just a typical chick lit with fluff and obvious romance. Nothing crazy, nothing horrible. Read it to satisfy those girly chick lit cravings.
Two stars. It was okay. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
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For PAR, a good lass, a wise woman, and a true lady.
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My name is Melissa Romney-Jones, but you can call me Honey.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Fiction. Literature. Romance. HTML:Hilarious and warmhearted, this "deliciously addictive" (Cosmopolitan) debut romantic comedy stars a woman who goes from doormat to diva when she sets up shop as the ultimate freelance girlfriend.
Melissa Romney-Jones can bake a perfect sponge cake, type her little heart out, and plan a party blindfolded. But none of that has helped her get far in life or in love. When she gets fired ?? again ?? she decides to market her impeccable social skills to single men. To avoid embarrassing her father, a Member of Parliament, Melissa dons a blond wig and becomes Honey, a no-nonsense bombshell who helps clueless bachelors shop, entertain, and navigate social minefields. She even attends parties if a client needs a "date." But when a dashing American starts to request Honey's services on a regular basis, it's only a matter of time before Honey's and Melissa's worlds colli

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