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The Divine Invasion by Philip K. Dick
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The Divine Invasion

by Philip K. Dick

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: VALIS Trilogy (2)

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English (10)  French (2)  Italian (1)  All languages (13)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
During the run of Lost, some fans and reviewers listed books that somehow related to Lost, either directly or tangentially. This classic book was one of them. This book was merely an example of how bad science fiction could actually be. This book was similar to stories by Vonnegut - some of the worst stories in sci-fi history. Praised for their satire and humor, they merely relied on shock value, crude scatological language, and sexual references. One word - trash. ( )
  kewaynco | Apr 10, 2016 |
After a fatal car accident on Earth, Herb Asher is placed into cryonic suspension as he waits for a spleen replacement. Clinically dead, Herb experiences lucid dreams while in suspended animation and relives the last six years of his life.

In the past, Herb lived as a recluse in an isolated dome on a remote planet in the binary star system, CY30-CY30B. Yah, a local divinity of the planet in exile from Earth, appears to Herb in a vision as a burning flame, and forces him to contact his sick female neighbor, Rybys Rommey, who happens to be terminally ill with multiple sclerosis and pregnant with Yah's child.

With the help of the immortal soul of Elijah, who takes the form of a wild beggar named Elias Tate, Herb agrees to become Rybys's legal husband and father of the unborn "savior". Together they plan to smuggle the six-month pregnant Rybys back to Earth, under the pretext of seeking help for Rybys' medical condition at a medical research facility. After being born in human form, Yah plans to confront the fallen angel Belial, who has ruled the Earth for 2000 years since the fall of Masada in the first century CE. Yah's powers, however, are limited by Belial's dominion on Earth, and the four of them must take extra precautions to avoid being detected by the forces of darkness.

Things do not go as planned. "Big Noodle", Earth's A.I. system, warns the ecclesiastical authorities in the Christian-Islamic church and Scientific Legate about the divine "invasion" and countermeasures are prepared. A number of failed attempts are made to destroy the unborn child, all of them thwarted by Elijah and Yah. After successfully making the interstellar journey back to Earth and narrowly avoiding a forced abortion, Rybys and Herb escape in the nick of time, only to be involved in a fatal taxi crash, probably due to the machinations of Belial. Rybys dies from her injuries sustained in the crash, and her unborn son Emmanuel (Yah in human form) suffers brain damage from the trauma but survives. Herb is critically injured and put into cryonic suspension until a spleen replacement can be found. Baby Emmanuel is placed into a synthetic womb, but Elias Tate manages to sneak Emmanuel out of the hospital before the church is able to kill him.

Six years pass. In a school for special children, Emmanuel meets Zina, a girl who also seems to have similar skills and talents, but acts as a surrogate teacher to Emmanuel. For four years, Zina helps Emmanuel regain his memory (the brain damage caused amnesia) and discover his true identity as Yah, creator of the universe.

When he's ready, Zina shows Emmanuel her own parallel universe. In this peaceful world, organized religion has little influence, Rybys Rommey is still alive and married to Herb Asher, and Belial is only a kid goat living in a petting zoo.

In an act of kindness, Zina and Emmanuel liberate the goat-creature from his cage, momentarily forgetting that the animal is Belial. The goat-creature finds Herb Asher and attempts to retain control of the world by possessing him and convincing him that Yahweh's creation is an ugly thing that should be shown for what it really is. Eventually Herb is saved by Linda Fox, a young singer whom he loves and who is his own personal Savior; she and the goat-creature meet and she kills it, defeating Belial. He finally discovers that this meeting happens over again for everyone in the world, and whether they choose Belial or their Savior decides if they find salvation.

( )
  bostonwendym | Mar 3, 2016 |
I listened to the Audio Version of this book. Valis One was incredibly rich, full of literary nuggets. The Divine Invasion, the sequel, is an interesting adventure.I like this book more than VALIS... but both works are needed to understand the full vision and exegesis of Philip K. Dick. His exegesis of the Church is quit funny. for example the main narrator says "I am God's legal father." I can see where Douglas Adams may have got his ideas for the great computer and the ultimate answer of Life The Universe and Everything: 42.
This type of book requires one to let the book evolve, and not attempt to confine it within an A-B=C plot line. The reader starts out in a simple pulpy reality of melodramatic science fiction. The melodramatic scene begins to unravel, as one ascends. The roller coaster takes you to a realm full of chaotic characters and scenes as imagined in Disney's Haunted House. We turn in the dark, and descend on a roller coaster built incredibly tall. So the descent takes us into a totally paranoid alternate
reality. By the book’s end, there is nothing trustworthy left in the world.’ said Australian critic Bruce Gillespie.
So, if you like your plot lines straight, and easy than Philip K. Dick may upset your settled reality. If however you understand that Phillip K. Dick will throw you for a loop, one can deal with confusion and being in the dark at times.The book was a tremendous journey into the lines between reality and make believe.
( )
  Gregorio_Roth | Dec 5, 2014 |
I listened to the Audio Version of this book. Valis One was incredibly rich, full of literary nuggets. The Divine Invasion, the sequel, is an interesting adventure.I like this book more than VALIS... but both works are needed to understand the full vision and exegesis of Philip K. Dick. His exegesis of the Church is quit funny. for example the main narrator says "I am God's legal father." I can see where Douglas Adams may have got his ideas for the great computer and the ultimate answer of Life The Universe and Everything: 42.
This type of book requires one to let the book evolve, and not attempt to confine it within an A-B=C plot line. The reader starts out in a simple pulpy reality of melodramatic science fiction. The melodramatic scene begins to unravel, as one ascends. The roller coaster takes you to a realm full of chaotic characters and scenes as imagined in Disney's Haunted House. We turn in the dark, and descend on a roller coaster built incredibly tall. So the descent takes us into a totally paranoid alternate
reality. By the book’s end, there is nothing trustworthy left in the world.’ said Australian critic Bruce Gillespie.
So, if you like your plot lines straight, and easy than Philip K. Dick may upset your settled reality. If however you understand that Phillip K. Dick will throw you for a loop, one can deal with confusion and being in the dark at times.The book was a tremendous journey into the lines between reality and make believe.
( )
  Gregorio_Roth | Dec 5, 2014 |
Dick uses teachings of mystical Judaism and Christianity in an attempt to explain his unsettling sense of another reality breaking through this one and proving it to be illusory. Interesting ideas but the book seems a bit more like notes for a book rather than the book itself. ( )
  robinamelia | Jan 9, 2012 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Philip K. Dickprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Morrill, RowenaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679734457, Paperback)

n The Divine Invasion, Philip K. Dick asks: What if God--or a being called Yah--were alive and in exile on a distant planet? How could a second coming succeed against the high technology and finely tuned rationalized evil of the modern police state? The Divine Invasion "blends Judaism, Kabalah, Zoroastrianism, and Christianity into a fascinating fable of human existence" (West Coast Revew of Books).

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:45 -0400)

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What if God--or a being called Yah--were alive and in exile on a distant planet? How could a second coming succeed against the high technology and finely tuned rationalized evil of the modern police state? --P. [4] of cover.

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