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Laches

by Plato

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952256,098 (3.55)None
This edition of Platos' short Dialogue, Laches, provides a detailed commentary on one of the most approachable and lively philosophical works in Greek. The concept of courage is the subject under discussion, in which Socrates questions and leads some prominent Athenian citizens to develop their ideas and recognise short comings. Two features of the work area particularly interesting: the argument and its setting draw upon and exploit the tensions in a wide range of 5th- and 4th-century BC cultural and social values submitting them to criticism: secondly, Plato's ideas and linguistic expression interrelated to provide a work which is ironically questioning rather than purely didactic. This miniature masterpiece can only be fully appreciated through a reading of the original Greek text. The simplicity of language (accessible to students with just one or two year's Greek) belies the richness of texture, subtlety of characterisation and liveliness of style. Laches provides an introduction to Greek philosophy and culture through the work of one its greatest thinkers and artists.… (more)
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A coragem não se dá apenas no campo de batalha, e como Sócrates bravamente lutou em Delium, mostrando extrema coragem, o general Laches permite que ele conduza a investigação entre este e outro militar de alta patente, Nicias, afim de aconselhar dois anciões sobre a educação de seus filhos. Devem eles treinar desde já no manejo de armaduras pesadas? Sim ou não? Mas deixar a investigação nas mãos de Sócrates é, e creio que Nicias o avisa, deixar-se levar a ter sua vida revelada, especialmente sua ignorância. Mesmo Sócrates tendo recomendado um bom professor de flauta e estando afinado no modo dório com a coragem, vale a pena incursar pela ética ao invés de escolher um dos lados?

Sobre a coragem deve se consultar um general, que afinal deve ter coragem. Mas ter não é saber. Certamente coragem não é segurar sua posição e não bater em retirada, e nem uma perseverança da alma (que afinal pode ser tola). A coragem envolve conhecimento do que causa terror ou confiança na guerra, como na vida, o conhecimento de bens e mazelas futuras. Mas esse conhecimento não se detém no futuro e assim se confunde com o conhecimento da virtude, do bem. ( )
  henrique_iwao | Aug 30, 2022 |
Yet another good dialogue. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Dec 17, 2018 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Platoprimary authorall editionscalculated
Schleiermacher, FriedrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This edition of Platos' short Dialogue, Laches, provides a detailed commentary on one of the most approachable and lively philosophical works in Greek. The concept of courage is the subject under discussion, in which Socrates questions and leads some prominent Athenian citizens to develop their ideas and recognise short comings. Two features of the work area particularly interesting: the argument and its setting draw upon and exploit the tensions in a wide range of 5th- and 4th-century BC cultural and social values submitting them to criticism: secondly, Plato's ideas and linguistic expression interrelated to provide a work which is ironically questioning rather than purely didactic. This miniature masterpiece can only be fully appreciated through a reading of the original Greek text. The simplicity of language (accessible to students with just one or two year's Greek) belies the richness of texture, subtlety of characterisation and liveliness of style. Laches provides an introduction to Greek philosophy and culture through the work of one its greatest thinkers and artists.

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