HomeGroupsTalkExplore
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

On Crimes and Punishments (1764)

by Cesare Beccaria

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5631437,381 (3.64)6
Beccarria's influential Treatise On Crimes and Punishments is considered a foundation work in the modern field of criminology. As Newman and Marongiu note in their introduction to the work, three master themes of the Enlightenment run through the Treatise: the idea of the social contract, the idea of science, and the belief in progress. The idea of the social contact forms the moral and political basis of the work's reformist zeal. Th e idea of science supports a dispassionate and reasoned appeal for reforms. The belief in progress is inextricably bound to the idea of science. All three provide the necessary foundation for accepting Beccaria's proposals. It is virtually impossible to ascertain which of several versions of the Treatise that appeared during his lifetime best reflected Becccaria's own thought. His use of many ideas of Enlightenment thinkers also makes it diffi cult to interpret what he has written. While Enlightenment thinkers wanted to break the chains of religion and advocated free men and free minds, there was considerable disagreement as to how this might be achieved, except in the most general terms. The editors have based this translation on the Francioni (1984) text, by far the most exhaustive critical Italian edition of Dei delitti e delle pene. This edition is undoubtedly the last that Beccaria personally oversaw and revised. This new translation, which includes an outstanding opening essay by the editors, is a welcome introduction to Beccaria and to the modern beginnings of criminology.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

8479690097
  archivomorero | Jun 22, 2022 |
8479690097
  archivomorero | Jun 22, 2022 |
On Crimes and Punishment, Cesare Beccaria argues for different punishments.
He starts with a famous quote,

"Every punishment which does not arise from absolute necessity is tyrannical." -- Montesquieu

Laws are conditions under which Men are united.
Punishments are necessities to defend public liberty.

Beccaria writes on all types of crimes, including Adultery, Suicide and Sodomy.
How do you convict Suicide? After all, the person has died.

It seemed that he has a strong case to argue for most of crimes and punishment.
One quote which I loved was, "The Laws is greater than of those by whom they are violated, the risk of torturing an innocent person is greater."

I imagine for death penalty, torture, the risk of inflicting pain on innocent people is greater. As I was learning about death penalty in the United States, they abolished it around 1850's - 1890's due to a lot of pressure from Social Justice groups. A few states still have death penalty.

During the late 1800s, Some people find it entertaining when someone was hanged in public. They would drink in public while watching execution. Now these are not in the book.

Overall a great introduction to Crimes and Punishment.

Deus Vult
--Gottfried--
( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Apr 5, 2018 |
On Crimes and Punishment, Cesare Beccaria argues for different punishments.
He starts with a famous quote,

"Every punishment which does not arise from absolute necessity is tyrannical." -- Montesquieu

Laws are conditions under which Men are united.
Punishments are necessities to defend public liberty.

Beccaria writes on all types of crimes, including Adultery, Suicide and Sodomy.
How do you convict Suicide? After all, the person has died.

It seemed that he has a strong case to argue for most of crimes and punishment.
One quote which I loved was, "The Laws is greater than of those by whom they are violated, the risk of torturing an innocent person is greater."

I imagine for death penalty, torture, the risk of inflicting pain on innocent people is greater. As I was learning about death penalty in the United States, they abolished it around 1850's - 1890's due to a lot of pressure from Social Justice groups. A few states still have death penalty.

During the late 1800s, Some people find it entertaining when someone was hanged in public. They would drink in public while watching execution. Now these are not in the book.

Overall a great introduction to Crimes and Punishment.

Deus Vult
--Gottfried--
( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Apr 5, 2018 |
préface de casamayor
  lsuj | Feb 24, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (27 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Beccaria, Cesareprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Casas, Juan Antonio de lasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Delval, Juan AntonioIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morellet, A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paolucci, HenryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Beccarria's influential Treatise On Crimes and Punishments is considered a foundation work in the modern field of criminology. As Newman and Marongiu note in their introduction to the work, three master themes of the Enlightenment run through the Treatise: the idea of the social contract, the idea of science, and the belief in progress. The idea of the social contact forms the moral and political basis of the work's reformist zeal. Th e idea of science supports a dispassionate and reasoned appeal for reforms. The belief in progress is inextricably bound to the idea of science. All three provide the necessary foundation for accepting Beccaria's proposals. It is virtually impossible to ascertain which of several versions of the Treatise that appeared during his lifetime best reflected Becccaria's own thought. His use of many ideas of Enlightenment thinkers also makes it diffi cult to interpret what he has written. While Enlightenment thinkers wanted to break the chains of religion and advocated free men and free minds, there was considerable disagreement as to how this might be achieved, except in the most general terms. The editors have based this translation on the Francioni (1984) text, by far the most exhaustive critical Italian edition of Dei delitti e delle pene. This edition is undoubtedly the last that Beccaria personally oversaw and revised. This new translation, which includes an outstanding opening essay by the editors, is a welcome introduction to Beccaria and to the modern beginnings of criminology.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.64)
0.5 1
1
1.5 2
2 4
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 4
4 16
4.5 1
5 11

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 182,756,305 books! | Top bar: Always visible