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Empire (2000)

by Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,232912,260 (3.61)5
Imperialism as we knew it may be no more, but Empire is alive and well. It is, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri demonstrate in this bold work, the new political order of globalization. It is easy to recognize the contemporary economic, cultural, and legal transformations taking place across the globe but difficult to understand them. Hardt and Negri contend that they should be seen in line with our historical understanding of Empire as a universal order that accepts no boundaries or limits. Their book shows how this emerging Empire is fundamentally different from the imperialism of European dominance and capitalist expansion in previous eras. Rather, today's Empire draws on elements of U.S. constitutionalism, with its tradition of hybrid identities and expanding frontiers.Empire identifies a radical shift in concepts that form the philosophical basis of modern politics, concepts such as sovereignty, nation, and people. Hardt and Negri link this philosophical transformation to cultural and economic changes in postmodern society--to new forms of racism, new conceptions of identity and difference, new networks of communication and control, and new paths of migration. They also show how the power of transnational corporations and the increasing predominance of postindustrial forms of labor and production help to define the new imperial global order.More than analysis, Empire is also an unabashedly utopian work of political philosophy, a new Communist Manifesto. Looking beyond the regimes of exploitation and control that characterize today's world order, it seeks an alternative political paradigm--the basis for a truly democratic global society.… (more)
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» See also 5 mentions

English (6)  Spanish (2)  Finnish (1)  All languages (9)
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
On Hardt and Negri

EMPIRE and MULTITUDE, by Hardt and Negri, are frustrating and irritating books. But most critics miss their one great innovation. They have replaced capital and commodity as the key concepts of Marxism and postmarxism. Instead, what is most important for studying social change is the production and reproduction of society itself. The technical term they have invented to try to explain this is bioproduction.

But they do not know what to do with this one great innovation. Class analysis may be less useful now than it was for classical Marxism, but we could start by imitating Marx. How would we define classes by their relation to the means of production of society? An elementary beginning would be: the state; non-state persons who control the big institutions; workers who have enough resources so that they can start their own businesses, or join worker coops, if they do not like their bosses; lesser workers; and everyone else.

Something missing? Yes. Women as a class, mothers and other child rearers, but also women as the primary transmitters of the local system of morality. More than all the others, they create society. They are the least appreciated source of future social change.

(I have also posted this at my Academia.edu website. See my LT profile.) ( )
  johnclaydon | Apr 5, 2020 |
I ( )
  uptownbookwormnyc | Apr 3, 2013 |
Empire, Michael Hardt & Antonio Negri, and A Theory of Post-Colonial Literature, Alfredo J. Lopez. Canadian Literature, 178 (autumn 2003), pp. 134-37
  Xerxesxerxes | Jun 10, 2009 |
It's great ( )
  Hugsted | Oct 31, 2008 |
If there is a work that can be called a 'Communist Manifesto' for our times, this is undoubtedly it. ( )
  Fledgist | Jan 21, 2006 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hardt, MichaelAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Negri, AntonioAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Atzert, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Didero, DanieleTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meyhoff, Karsten WindTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pandolfi, AlessandroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wirthensohn, AndreasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Qualsiasi arnese diventa un'arma se lo si maneggia bene.
ANI DIFRANCO

Gli uomini lottano e perdono la loro battaglia; ciò per cui avevano combattuto si realizza comunque, malgrado la loro sconfitta, ma poi si rivela altro da ciò che essi credevano, e allora altri uomini devono continuare a lottare per ciò che i primi chiamavano con un altro nome.
WILLIAM MORRIS
Dedication
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L'impero di sta materializzando proprio sotto i nostri occhi.
Quotations
C'è un'antica leggenda che potrebbe illuminare l vita futura della militanza comunista: la leggenda di san Francesco d'Assisi. Vediamo quale fu la sua impresa. Per denunciare la povertà della moltitudine, ne adotto la condizione comune e vi scoprì la potenza ontologica di una nuova società. Il militante comunista fa lo stesso nel momento in cui identifica nella condizione comune della moltitudine la sua enorme ricchezza. In opposizione al capitalismo nascente, Francesco rifiutava qualsiasi disciplina strumentale, e alla mortificazione della carne (nella povertà e nell'ordine istituito) ehi contrapponeva una vita gioiosa che comprendeva tutte le creature e tutta la natura: gli animali, sorella luna, fratello sole, gli uccelli dei campi, gli uomini sfruttati e i poveri, tutti insieme contro la volontà di potere e la corruzione. Nella postmoderni, ci troviamo ancora nella situazione di Francesco, a contrapporre la gioia di essere alla miseria del potere. Si tratta di una rivoluzione che sfuggirà al controllo, poiché il biopotere e il comunismo, la cooperazione e la rivoluzione restano insieme semplicemente nell'amore, e con innocenza. Queste sono la chiarezza e la gioia incontenibile di essere comunisti.
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Wikipedia in English (5)

Imperialism as we knew it may be no more, but Empire is alive and well. It is, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri demonstrate in this bold work, the new political order of globalization. It is easy to recognize the contemporary economic, cultural, and legal transformations taking place across the globe but difficult to understand them. Hardt and Negri contend that they should be seen in line with our historical understanding of Empire as a universal order that accepts no boundaries or limits. Their book shows how this emerging Empire is fundamentally different from the imperialism of European dominance and capitalist expansion in previous eras. Rather, today's Empire draws on elements of U.S. constitutionalism, with its tradition of hybrid identities and expanding frontiers.Empire identifies a radical shift in concepts that form the philosophical basis of modern politics, concepts such as sovereignty, nation, and people. Hardt and Negri link this philosophical transformation to cultural and economic changes in postmodern society--to new forms of racism, new conceptions of identity and difference, new networks of communication and control, and new paths of migration. They also show how the power of transnational corporations and the increasing predominance of postindustrial forms of labor and production help to define the new imperial global order.More than analysis, Empire is also an unabashedly utopian work of political philosophy, a new Communist Manifesto. Looking beyond the regimes of exploitation and control that characterize today's world order, it seeks an alternative political paradigm--the basis for a truly democratic global society.

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