HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Gray Lensman (1951)

by Edward E. Smith

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Lensman: Publication order (2), Lensman: Chronological order (4)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,3221414,691 (3.55)1 / 44
Fiction. Science Fiction & Fantasy. HTML:

Lensman Kimball Kinnison has attained the goal which every Lensman seeks, and so few attain, that of Unattached Lensman, a Lensman who is accountable to no one anywhere, completely independent, completely free. Further, he is learning how to fully use his lens. This knowledge is crucial, because as he works his way up through the ranks of the enemy the problems are growing more and more complex and dangerous. Coming face-to-face, and mind-to-mind, with the multi-tentacled scaley creature in his corpse-littered domain, Kimball Kinnison must use everything he has learned to defeat the beast or die trying.

.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 44 mentions

English (13)  French (1)  All languages (14)
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
Sometimes, I'm a fool. I thought, perhaps, that the "so called" golden age of sci-fi before Heinlein would be as painful to read as the old Jules Verne. I even tried to read the first ten pages of the first book of the Lensman of E. E. Smith PHD and cringed down to my soul. I was thinking that nothing would be worth the pain of reading this trash. And yet, all of my favorite past couple of generations of sci-fi authors swore by the old doc, and there are still generations of readers that are surprised and delighted by the stories. Heck, the fourth book is considered by some to be the 98th best sci-fi book of all time. I buckled down, gritted my teeth, and picked up the fourth without so much as reading eleven pages of the first three.

I WAS DUMBFOUNDED. I was awestruck. I was plainly amazed and giddy in the reading of these little serialized bubblegum stories of sci-fi heroes. I'm too young to have watched Flash Gordon, but I understand the draw. I'm certainly old enough to have sat amazed through all the Star Wars at the inception. I've watched all of the original Star Treks, (not to mention every iteration after). I was forced to re-evaluate my entire internal consistency engine of sci-fi idea sources and lineage, and all of a sudden, the mitochondrial eve of sci-fi tropes (at least the best surviving eve) is FOUND. Now I understand. The light shines upon my mind. The great cosmic egg lights up like a big bulb.

So I asked in a small voice... "So the Lensman series is what encouraged the Green Lantern Comics into being? It also encouraged the biggest space operas? It took over as the sci-fi successor to all westerns and greek hero myths?" And E. E. Smith replied, "Yes, you dumbshit."

AAaaahhhh... ok... I feel like a moron now, but at least I didn't proliferate that weird-ass idea about galaxies colliding... whew... I'm back on my moral high ground again. :)

I might just have to read them in order again and ignore, dutifully, the Really Bad Physics in favor of the Great Fun.

Update:
I can't get this out of my head: The proper term for the collision of two planets is "Squishingly". I can't unread what I have read, so I pay it forward. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
The fourth volume in the six-part Lensman series. It continues the development of the Galactic Patrol and the extension of their fight against Boskone into the second galaxy. ( )
  Tatoosh | Jul 15, 2017 |
Action-packed pulp that's classic sci-fi, but a bit short on character and development. Otherwise the plot moves well and Smith certainly has imagination. However, he's definitely old school so he likes his men to be men and his women to stand by supporting their men - so definitely *not* in the feminist category. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
Embarrassingly badly written. He spends time telling us in detail things we don't care about and glosses over what would be interesting. He just can't seem to be bothered to do it properly. Poor show. ( )
  Lukerik | Nov 17, 2015 |
The story continues as the Lensmen continue to make progress against the 'pirates' while slowly coming closer to finding out who's really behind all of the problems in the Galaxy! See my other reviews for comments on this series, but these really are great examples of the space opera genre. ( )
  Karlstar | Jul 4, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Smith, Edward E.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
McColm, ReedNarratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Binkley, RicCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Donnell, A. J.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Foss, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaughan, JackCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lawson, Neil StuartCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palmer, WarrenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schlück, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Fiction. Science Fiction & Fantasy. HTML:

Lensman Kimball Kinnison has attained the goal which every Lensman seeks, and so few attain, that of Unattached Lensman, a Lensman who is accountable to no one anywhere, completely independent, completely free. Further, he is learning how to fully use his lens. This knowledge is crucial, because as he works his way up through the ranks of the enemy the problems are growing more and more complex and dangerous. Coming face-to-face, and mind-to-mind, with the multi-tentacled scaley creature in his corpse-littered domain, Kimball Kinnison must use everything he has learned to defeat the beast or die trying.

.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.55)
0.5
1 5
1.5 1
2 17
2.5 4
3 52
3.5 15
4 60
4.5 5
5 30

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 208,471,672 books! | Top bar: Always visible