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Inch by Inch (1960)

by Leo Lionni

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3,1951303,628 (3.98)9
To keep from being eaten, an inchworm measures a robin's tail, a flamingo's neck, a toucan's beak, a heron's legs, and a nightingale's song.
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» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 130 (next | show all)
Measuring, Ingenuity
  TikkunOlam | Aug 22, 2022 |
This is such a cute book! I highly recommend it! It is about an inchworm that tries not be eaten. On its way, it meets a Robin who has intentions on eating him for dinner. When the inchworm discovers this, he comes up with a plan. He tries to talk up the Robin and tries to make himself look useful. He tells the Robin that without him, it would be hard to measure things. Throughout the book, the inchworm continuously shows the Robin how well he can measure. It is a great book for any educational math teacher! One could definitely use this book to explain measurements. ( )
  cmb7421 | Apr 26, 2021 |
Inch by Inch is a story about an inchworm with a goal to not be eaten. The inchworm meets a Robin, who plans to eat him, but the inchworm comes up with an idea that could save him. He tells the Raven that he is useful, and begins to measure things for the Raven using his body. This story tells the story of the strange companionship between the worm and the raven. This is definitely a good book to incorporate into a math classroom. It provides a fun story and teaches the introduces the idea of measurements and measurement units. It also teaches about the importance of being able to measure, as it ends up saving the inchworm's life! ( )
  kaylc05 | Nov 20, 2020 |
00001345
  lcslibrarian | Aug 13, 2020 |
A small green inchworm is proud that he can measure anything—a robin’s tail, a flamingo’s neck, a toucan’s beak. One day a bird threatens to eat him if he cannot measure his song. The clever inchworm uses his measurement skills to move inch by inch away from danger. I liked this story a lot, especially how it discussed a math topic in a non-traditional way. Its illustrations also proved to be deserving of the Caldecott honor. ( )
  SophiaLCastillo | Apr 27, 2020 |
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One day a hungry robin saw an inchworm, green as an emerald, sitting on a twig.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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To keep from being eaten, an inchworm measures a robin's tail, a flamingo's neck, a toucan's beak, a heron's legs, and a nightingale's song.

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